1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    14

    Default Pickup truck utility beds

    I am looking for information from people utilizing a utility bed on a pickup cab/chassis. I am interested in any pros/cons or lessons learned. Thanks.

  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber
    ff7134's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,093

    Default

    We have a Stahl utility body on our Grass Truck. It works good and it is cheaper than a custom body. So far we have not had any problems, it all in the size of the body and what you are going to use it for.
    AKA: Mr. Whoo-Whoo

    IAFF Local 3900

    IACOJ-The Crusty Glow Worm

    ENGINE 302 - The Fire Rats

    F.A.N.T.A.M FOOLS FTM-PTB

  3. #3
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Oct 1999
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    60

    Default

    A company I was in in the past had a utility body unit as a light rescue. It worked pretty well and was cost effective. No bells and whistles but very workable. There are many arrangments available (including custom) for compartment layouts so you can get about anything you want. Be sure to get a HD (1 Ton atleast) Chassis because weight runs up fast.

  4. #4
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    86

    Default Usage?

    Dudley,

    What are you trying to utilize the standard truck for? Brush, rescue ??????

    Stay Sfae and Good Fishing!

    Fish

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    14

    Default Usage follow-up

    It will be used to carry a 4 bottle cascade, SCBA, and ALS gear for EMS first response. We're planning on mounting it on a crew cab 1 ton which will make it quite a long truck.

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    Fyrtrks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    Binghamton,N.Y.
    Posts
    265

    Default Utility Body

    Yes I do represent a manufacturer of apparatus bodies.

    You have several different options with utility bodies.

    1 Commercial metal body (Reading, Sthal, Morrison Omaha, etc......)
    These units they are usually but not always steel sometimes aluminum. Steel will rust and aluminum will corrode. They have a limited compartment arrangement and are not very flexible.

    2 Commercial fiberglass body (Astoria and Brand Fx) These units are will not rust or corrode but will crack and delaminate. These units can be hand built, but usually are made with some type of molded (limited) arrangement.

    3 "Custom" fiberglass body (Attack One and Swab) These units are supplied by a apparatus manufacturer therefore you can get a complete unit delivered lettered and striped. Again the drawback is the limited compartment dimensions.

    4 Custom Fire Apparatus body (Any apparatus manufacturer) These units will be built by your manufacturer of choice but it has to fit into their schedule and you will pay a premium. They will be Aluminum or Stainless which may corrode or dent.

    5 Poly Type body(Any manufacturer including your own Fire Dept) These units will give you all of the advantages of the above-mentioned bodies with out the disadvantages of Steel, Stainless, Aluminum, or Fiberglass. Yes Poly bodies are more expensive than a conventional steel utility body but it will come with a lifetime corrosion warranty and the option for roll up doors. They are just as flexible as a custom body with out the dent or corrosion worries. They are just as rust/corrosion resistant as a fiberglass body without the limitations of a mold and without the cracking or delaminating. Poly Bodies like any newer technology have advanced. The days of ill fitting doors and pulling fasteners have gone. The painting is equal or greater than that of a metal body. You can have an integral tank built into your unit lowering it's center of gravity and making a stronger truck body.

    Each department has it's own needs and it's own budget, you alone know what will fit into your budget and needs.
    Fyrtrks

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber
    npfd801's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Somewhere in Illinois
    Posts
    2,220

    Default

    We run a light rescue with a Ford F-350 diesel four door chassis, and for the money, it isn't a bad unit. I think out the door equipped, it ran right at $60,000. Unit was built by Monroe Trucks with a Stahl box. It has a slide-out full length tray from the center compartment that runs the full length of the box, which lets us maximize space usage. We currently carry four SCBA, EMS equipment, some water rescue equipment, a generator, sump pump, extinguishers, oil dry, and 20 or so spare bottles in this unit, plus whatever else I forgot. The slide-out tray will probably be yanked in the near future, and a four-bottle high pressure cascade with fill enclosure will be fitted, if all goes well.

    Monroe Trucks

    We run it as a manpower rig for those that didn't make the engine, as well as an EMS response vehicle for medical calls. The thought at the time of purchase was to beat up a cheap vehicle instead of something pricier. An older unit, on a 1991 Ford F-350, served until last year as just such a unit, with a walk-in style Stahl body, and held up fairly well. The box is starting to rust, but this unit took a bit more abuse than is typical for our department, including a couple of accidents. It still responds as a reserve unit and a third-out manpower unit at another station until we replace it in the next year.

    The department philosphy has changed somewhat, and our latest light rescues are built on F-550 4wd 4-doors with a custom built apparatus body. These were close to $100K more than the Stahl bodied unit. I suppose the box will last longer, and can be fitted with a new chassis, so long-term the cost difference may not be so drastic. We have two of these unts, one serves as a rescue unit with a more serious complement of extrication equipment than that carried on our outlying engines, and the other serves as a ladder tender type unit with typical truck company and salvage equipment. Both are also EMS response units instead of rolling an engine.

    Rescue 843

    I'll also say that the newer Ford Powerstroke and 5-speed auto tranny are a vast improvement of the older combo. Our latest F-550 has the new combo, and it's fantastic.

    Long winded post, I'm sorry. If you'd like some detailed pictures of our Stahl bodied unit, let me know. I'd be happy to e-mail some to you.

    --Joel
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by npfd801; 03-26-2004 at 12:35 AM.

  8. #8
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    25

    Default Custom - high craftsmanship

    We had ours built by EJ Metals. These guys are innovators in design building a structure that can fit anything you wish. Our truck, responding to a call drove over a large rock/boulder with the rear axle, lifting the truck and slamming the truck back down (on top of the rock 3' tall) on the rear corner of the box (a rear compartment). With 325 gallons of water on board you would think the rear of the box would be smashed, sprung and severly damaged. Well guess again. The box wa intact, only had to replace the pan in the rear compartment and reskin the door. That is it! These guys have extensive knowledge - coming from a prominent apparatus manufacturer. Our unit is on the homepage - check them out http://www.ejmetals.com/ . Look at the rescue pages may give you idea on what you maybe looking for.
    Last edited by chiefwaterloofd; 03-26-2004 at 07:46 AM.

  9. #9
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    207

    Default

    Dudley, Where you located in Ohio? Anyway, we hAve been looking at the same idea for sometime and have considered the basic utility box as compared to the custom box to put onto a crew cab chassis. First thing to remeMber is to calculate the weight of the rig plus the weight of the equipment you plan on puting on the vehicle now and in the future, and the weight of the people. Just make sure that the GVW will be big enough to haul all the essentials you can think of, and that of what others think of because most times it will be one big tool box going down the road.

    Also figure in the factor of cost involvement. If you can only spend about 50k then the utility body makes for a great unit. It has adjustable shelves and compartment lighting and works out real well for most applications. If you want to double that price you can get custom bodies applied for the exact features you may want.

    The pro's of the utility obviuosly are the cost. They also stand up pretty well considered. With the adjustable shelving and lights they are pretty decent to work with. 2 for 1! The con's are that they are not customized on the interior although you can customize the outside, you are limited in box size and compartments.

    The pro's for the other side are the custom features, but you pay for that also. Many applications can be met and the fir and finish are a lot better. You limit the box only by your imagination.

    Now, us folks being volunteers we decided the utility box would work for what we wanted. That was carry RIT gear and people, EMS supplies and people, Wildland equipment and people, and small rescue equipment and people. It is going to be used for those features, and sending people out for mutual-aid calls instead of an engine, EMS crews out when our squad is out, Gives us 4-wheel drive capabilities in the winter, school-training vehicle, and the like. We figured we could use the extra 50k to make a portable cascade system that this vehicle can tow that is current with all standards for fill stations, and stil get a TIC.

    But then again, that is just our plans. Others do it the same or similar, and those of us that have th money can get some really nice rigs made up through their imagination.

    It all comes down to what is best for you all!

    STILL STANDING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  10. #10
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rural Iowa
    Posts
    3,106

    Default Re: Utility Body

    Fyrtrks Give a price index on these for same config. If Option 1 (steel) costs 1000 beaverpelts, what would other options run?

    Originally posted by Fyrtrks
    Yes I do represent a manufacturer of apparatus bodies.

    You have several different options with utility bodies.

    1 Commercial metal body (Reading, Sthal, Morrison Omaha, etc......)
    These units they are usually but not always steel sometimes aluminum. Steel will rust and aluminum will corrode. They have a limited compartment arrangement and are not very flexible.

    2 Commercial fiberglass body (Astoria and Brand Fx) These units are will not rust or corrode but will crack and delaminate. These units can be hand built, but usually are made with some type of molded (limited) arrangement.

    3 "Custom" fiberglass body (Attack One and Swab) These units are supplied by a apparatus manufacturer therefore you can get a complete unit delivered lettered and striped. Again the drawback is the limited compartment dimensions.

    4 Custom Fire Apparatus body (Any apparatus manufacturer) These units will be built by your manufacturer of choice but it has to fit into their schedule and you will pay a premium. They will be Aluminum or Stainless which may corrode or dent.

    5 Poly Type body(Any manufacturer including your own Fire Dept) These units will give you all of the advantages of the above-mentioned bodies with out the disadvantages of Steel, Stainless, Aluminum, or Fiberglass. Yes Poly bodies are more expensive than a conventional steel utility body but it will come with a lifetime corrosion warranty and the option for roll up doors. They are just as flexible as a custom body with out the dent or corrosion worries. They are just as rust/corrosion resistant as a fiberglass body without the limitations of a mold and without the cracking or delaminating. Poly Bodies like any newer technology have advanced. The days of ill fitting doors and pulling fasteners have gone. The painting is equal or greater than that of a metal body. You can have an integral tank built into your unit lowering it's center of gravity and making a stronger truck body.

    Each department has it's own needs and it's own budget, you alone know what will fit into your budget and needs.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register