1. #1
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    Question Piston Intake Valve

    Can anyone help me with rational for moving the intake vakve to the curb side of the engine? Is there anything in NFPA about the valve being on the opposite side from the pump panel?

    I need your input.

    Thanks,
    Larry

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    Default intake valve

    there is nothing in 1901 or 1911 that says the valve will be on the curb side. I would think that would be a dept option when building a truck. I have seen intakes on all sides and front and rear. Is your dept doing this? Jeff

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    Firetruckfixer,

    Yeah, I moved the "jaffery" valve to the curb side. I had read on this forum a year or so ago about departments moving the valve. Some of the reasons given were to clear the pump panel, get the 5 in away from the operator, etc. Many stated a safety factor. It made sence to me, and we moved it. Now a couple people want to move it back. I'm just trying to get some additional info. Someone told me NFPA said something about the valve being away from the operator.

    Thanks

    LMF

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    I like the idea of keeping the panel side of the pump ready to draft, I feel its very helpfull to be able to feel your suction line when drafting. I also like not being next to a charged line I have no control over. When the intake relief valve on the Jaffry opens its not filling my boots with water if its on the other side too. However, I usually keep a knee into the LDH to feel pressure drops before I can see them on the guage, if its on the other side of the pump I can't do that (for the same reason I dislike cross mounts).
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    THE NFPA REVISIONS COMING INTO EFFECT FOR 2004 RECOMMEND NO LINES LARGER THAN 2 1/2 BE CONNECTED AT THE PUMP PANEL. FROM THE ARTICAL I READ IN FIRE RESCUE MAGIZINE SOME ON THE COMMITTEE WANTED ALL CONNECTIONS TAKEN OFF THE PUMP PANEL. THEY SITED THE SAFETY FACTOR OF TRIPPING, LINES BURSTING ETC. I PERSONALLY WANT TO DRAFT ON THE PANEL SIDE SO I CAN VISUALLY MONITOR THE WATER LEVEL WHICH I AM DRAFTING FROM. THIS ALSO MAKES PULLING A PRIME EASIER BECAUSE YOU CAN SEE AND FEEL THE WATER IN THE LIGHT WEIGHT SUCTION WE USE. ON THE OTHER HAND I DON'T WANT A 5" LINE BESIDE OF ME FOR THE SAME REASONS THE NFPA REVISON COMMITTTEE STATED. I GUESS IT IS UP TO YOUR DEPT. TO DECIDE WHICH IS BEST FOR YOU. YOU CAN ALWAYS USE A KEYSTONE TO DRAFT WITH ON THE PANEL SIDE AND A PISTON ON THE OFFICER'S SIDE.(KEYSTONES ARE USAULLY MUCH CHEAPER TO PURCHASE) GOOD LUCK, STAY SAFE AND GOD BLESS.

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    Default

    Had a 3 inch line bust on me a few years ago. Knocked me across the street, knocked the wind out of me and bruised my stomach. Needless to say I always make sure I stand to the inside of the discharge lines now except when operating a top mount.

    Mark

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