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  1. #1
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    Question Piston Intake valve

    Anyone out there run the piston intake valve on the curb side of the engine? Anyone know of an NFPA parts that pertain to placing the intake valve on the opposite side of the engine from the pump panel?

    Thanks,

    LMF


  2. #2
    Forum Member SCOOBY14B's Avatar
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    Default

    We run them on both sides on some. New ladders have the Hale electric valve on curb side. No NFPA saying which side.

  3. #3
    Forum Member Weruj1's Avatar
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    none that I know of.................
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
    Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
    ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
    RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
    LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

  4. #4
    Forum Member CaptOldTimer's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    We use piston intakes valves as well as keystone (butterfly) valves. The piston intakes are on all newer apparatus and the keystone valves are on all the older pumpers. The older pumpers does have a large diameter intake, either on the right side or the rear.
    We only use the piston intake on the right side of our apparatus, so we only take water in on the right side. This is for safety reason, as we don't want the large diameter hose (LDH) to strike the operator should it burst or come off the intake.

    We have always use the right side of the apparatus for the LDH intake, since putting it in service in 1985. If the apparatus doesn't have a right side of the pump such as brush units or quick response vehicles, then the suction is on the left, operators side. We stress that safety is very important when the suction is on the left side. We stress safety any way, reguardless where the water comes in and leaves the apparatus. I have seen too many hose lines come apart at the coulpings and beat the heck out the operator before they could get out of the way.

    I always hated to have the soft sleeve used on the left side. You either got wet from a bad gasket or loose fitting coupling or the darn thing was always in your way. I was glad to see the front suctions come in on the pumpers years ago. I have seen the lkarge suction nipple come out of the hydrant. This is scary! They are just leaded in anyway.

    I, when I was a pump operator, tried to have all the discharges used on the right side of the apparatus, before I placed a line on the operators side.

    When the cross lays came to be, I made sure that the hose was pulled to the right and not to the left so I wouldn't be working around a charges hose line over my head. By the way, rear discharges worked very well too! This goes for booster lines too.


    Stay Safe & Well out there....

  5. #5
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    Cap

    Like me you probably remember when charged lines were tied off.

  6. #6
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    We have them on both sides of one pumper and on the driver side of the other. In 22 years, I have not seen anyone use the passenger side intake. Our supply line almost always comes in with a smooth bend at the pump panel, if you stand inside the bend, a burst hose will go away from you. We used to learn to pump by putting a leg against the supply line and using that as your gauge on your incoming water supply. If the hose was hard, you could give more. If the hose was getting soft, you were getting close to your max.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  7. #7
    Forum Member CaptOldTimer's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Bones42
    We have them on both sides of one pumper and on the driver side of the other. In 22 years, I have not seen anyone use the passenger side intake. Our supply line almost always comes in with a smooth bend at the pump panel, if you stand inside the bend, a burst hose will go away from you. We used to learn to pump by putting a leg against the supply line and using that as your gauge on your incoming water supply. If the hose was hard, you could give more. If the hose was getting soft, you were getting close to your max.


    We use to do the same too, with the line coming to the operators side. I have gotten wet many of times too. I was pointing out the safety aspect to have the suction and discharges all on the right side or away from the operator. Most of the soft sleeve connections that came in on the operators side was always in the way. You were never on the correct side of the sleeve should you need to do something around the pumper. If the hose is hard you can ALWAYS give more!!!!

    Yes we use to tie the discharge line to the pump. We used brass couplings too until the late 1960's.

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