View Poll Results: Do you pull electric meters?

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  • Yes, any time crews go in.

    21 14.89%
  • No, never.

    86 60.99%
  • Only under certain conditions.

    34 24.11%
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  1. #126
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    Im kind of amazed by the guys that you would think say "never say never" saying never.To repeat an often used phrase "its just another tool in the tool box"
    ?

  2. #127
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    My nephew is a field supervisor for National Grid. We had a discussion on pulling meters and he sated that any firefighter who thinks that he/she can pull a meter safely without the proper training and the proper equipment has a death wish.
    Last edited by DeputyChiefGonzo; 03-31-2011 at 04:35 PM.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
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  3. #128
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    Have had three incidents in the last five years where storm damage caused the neutral to be charged. "Pulling the meter", which we don't do, would not have made a difference.

  4. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by tree68 View Post
    Works if you can get to the breaker. Mines in a back corner of the basement.
    Is the meter there as well? Maybe this is a design feature unique to my former jurisdiction. The meter was in the same place as the main breaker. Our in-service from our utility advised there could be serious injury and possibly death by electrocution if one pulled the meter.
    Politics is like driving. To go forward select "D", to go backward select "R."

  5. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by slackjawedyokel View Post
    Im kind of amazed by the guys that you would think say "never say never" saying never.To repeat an often used phrase "its just another tool in the tool box"
    In this case I'll gladly ignore the old "never say never" axiom.

    It may be "another tool in the tool box", but it's also a good way to end up in a pine box.

  6. #131
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    SC fire - in my area we have a lot of houses that have underground service running to the meter (no drip loop to cut) the meter box has a large gauge wire (wires) running to a breaker box central location - the main disconnect is there and the wiring radiates out from there. So you may have 30 or 40 feet of heavy wire running through the attic with no "good" way to kill it. An outside disconnect would be best but we have lax fire codes. And I have goggled NIOSH and OSHA looking for meter pulling injuries - struck out, can some one give me some links. I dont want to end up in a pine box.
    ?

  7. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfd1992 View Post
    In this case I'll gladly ignore the old "never say never" axiom.

    It may be "another tool in the tool box", but it's also a good way to end up in a pine box.
    THAT it is. Also a good way to get TIME OFF here. T.C.

  8. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by scfire86 View Post
    Is the meter there as well? Maybe this is a design feature unique to my former jurisdiction. The meter was in the same place as the main breaker. Our in-service from our utility advised there could be serious injury and possibly death by electrocution if one pulled the meter.
    This is an old house (ca 1840, wiring obviously later). The meter is on the outside, on a front corner of the house. The line then drops inside, to the basement. To reach it you either have to come inside the house and go down the stairs (about 15 feet from the nearest door) or come in through the outside access to the basement (at the very rear of the house) and travel the full length of the basement (about 45-45').

    It's not a unique set up in this area. We still have houses with knob and tube...

    The 1959 built house I lived in in MI also had the breaker panel in the basement.

    As often as not when National Grid shows up they just cut the power on the pole.
    Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

    Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

  9. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by tree68 View Post
    As often as not when National Grid shows up they just cut the power on the pole.
    That was the routine when we had a commercial structure.
    Politics is like driving. To go forward select "D", to go backward select "R."

  10. #135
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    In my area, more often than not, if the breaker panel is not immediately inside the meter, there is an external disconnect. That is on construction as of 2009.

    Of course, that represents about .05% of my buildings.

    I know of a reasonable number of homes where the meter is not located close to the breaker panel. I know of many homes where the breaker panel is a decent distance from the main entrance. My house is one of those. Enter front door, 35 feet to cellar steps, then 15 feet from cellar steps.

    We do not pull meters. Power company, when told there is a fire, has a truck on scene within 10 minutes from all the times that I can recall. We don't normally wait for them to arrive before beginning our attack.

    We did have a guy get a minor shock once when siding on a house became charged.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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