1. #26
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    One material I would NOT consider is Galvaneal.Nothing but trouble looking for a place to happen.If you're trading out every 5-10 years it might be OK but if you plan on keeping the rig for awhile avoid it like the plague. T.C.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rescue101
    One material I would NOT consider is Galvaneal.Nothing but trouble looking for a place to happen.If you're trading out every 5-10 years it might be OK but if you plan on keeping the rig for awhile avoid it like the plague. T.C.
    Keep going Tim.......why?
    In Arduis Fidelis
    Faithful in Adversity

  3. #28
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    Well,Galvaneal in it's pure form was a step in the right direction.However anytime you bend it,form it,shear it,bolt it or weld it you defeat the purpose unless you "redip"it afterwards.Now since you will find bodybuilders using one of the above practices you open an avenue for corrosion to start.And it just snowballs from there.In the short term it's OK but since our replacement schedule seems to get stretched to twenty plus years we go with aluminum and poly tanks.I think our last galvaneal truck went to Wisc. somewhere. T.C.

  4. #29
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    Talking hmmmm

    Quote Originally Posted by Fire304

    Trivia, anyone besides Rescue 101 tell me what brand of heavy truck experimented with aluminum frame rails? (It was a dismal failure)
    Kenneworth - 1968 - K100
    Kenneworth - 1972 - W9
    Freightliner - FLC 120, and FLA Cabover - Early - Mid 80s

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    I think Mack built a few at Hayward, Calif. An "L" in the second position of the old style VINs on Hayward trucks usually indicated an aluminum frame. Examples of F model VINs

    F786 was an F700 with a 300 Maxidyne built in Allentown
    FS786 was the same thing from Hayward with a steel frame
    FL786 was the same thing from Hayward with an aluminum frame.

    I owned FS786LT 22315. It was a '74 F model single drive tractor with a 300 Maxidyne engine, built in Hayward. It had a lightweight package (aluminum doors, roof and other components) but a steel frame.

    Later on I owned F712ST ????. It was an Allentown truck with the 315 engine and tandem drive axles. I don't think Allentown ever built aluminum frames. Most (certainly not all) Allentown trucks were purebreds. Most Hayward trucks were mutts. Mine had Mack power but Rockwell axles.

    If Harvey Eckart reads this, he'll surely come in and correct me.

    Stay safe out there, everyone goes home.

  6. #31
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    shame on you for not remembering the serial number of the "purebred".

    Some of the best times of my life were spent in the right hand seats of those two tractors!
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

  7. #32
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    Default Stainless Steel

    Quote Originally Posted by firepiper1
    Poly - Weight wise it's pretty heavy, looks horrible as a body sheet (even painted) if it is damaged it takes a pro to repair it.

    I have to disagree with you on this one. I have seen a few Darley/PolyBilt trucks and you cant tell the difference as far as appearance goes. They use the same paint on poly that they do on metal bodies. The weight is about the same as aluminum with the strength of stainless. The bodies come with a LIFETIME warranty against corrosion or structural defects. If they are damaged, any body shop that works on Saturn vehicles can repair them. I think that poly has alot of potential.
    I hear Seagrave is using a new grade of Stainless. Not 304, better to work with if repairs are needed, also less dollars?

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