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  1. #1
    Forum Member FGFD43's Avatar
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    Question Laying your hose

    Got your attention? Here's something I haven't seen discussed in a while. What kind of hose lays (supply & preconnect) do you or your department prefer and why? To start off: I prefer the "triple lay" on preconnect lines since mamnpower is always a issue at my volunteer dept. and you don't need that extra guy to untangle the spagetti beside the engine. My dept. uses "flat lays" exclusively for supply lines.
    Kevin Sink
    Fair Grove Fire Dept.
    Thomasville, NC USA
    kevinsink@northstate.net


  2. #2
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    My Engine has everything flat.

    -All Engines on the dept have their hose bed loaded Left to Right.

    -Nothing is Preconnected(except the trash line in the bumper.)

    -The Primary Bed has 6 lenghts of 1 3/4 finished off with 12 lengths of 2 1/2. The top two 1 3/4 sections are made into a horseshoe load so the nozzleman and Backup man can easily remove each of thier lengths.

    -The Secondary bed is similar just with less 2 1/2.

    -The bed is always unloaded Right to Left.

    -Without Horseshoe loads, each man would take 3 folds R to L. This would be equal to one length. Each man takes 1 length...the nozzle man to the fire floor, backup man the floor below and if equiped a door man to the floor below that or at the entrance. Usually anyhow.

    The 2 1/2 bed is also flat loaded as is the 3 1/2 hose for supply.

    Why do we do this? Because we take only the hose we need. No more and no less. We do not stretch a second line untill we have the first stretched and in operation.

    I've worked in depts that used preconnects...sometimes we would end up with to much hose in the front yard or street. With just two overly long stretches there can be quite a mess of spagetti and more chances of having kinks and burst lengths. And we also had what would be considered to be worse...short stretches. Guys would just yank the preconnect regardless if it would reach or not.

    Something to think about the Triple-layer-load...I worked in a dept that used it frequently. Although there has been some discussion I understand of getting away from it. It usually left bad kinks and tangles around trees and other obstacles. While it might not leave spagetti in front of the rig...after it is charged....there should be a control man assigned to follow it from the Engine to the nozzle team...removing all kinks as he goes. Otherwise you might end up with the situation they had in Ohio were a fireman was killed when the hose stretch wasn't performed properly with a control man.

    The other problem with the 3-layer is once the nozzle man has pulled the entire load out he only has the nozzle in his hand. He would have to then gather hose up for his advance and then carry it up the stairs or to wherever the operation was to begin from. Usually very sloppilly as well. The nozzle man should have at least one working length for advancement into the fire area. This almost ensures enough hose and will prevent a short stretch.

    Regardless of the load...you should ALWAYS have a guy there to remove kinks and ensure a proper and effective stretch.

    FTM-PTB
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    Last edited by FFFRED; 04-20-2004 at 04:50 PM.

  3. #3
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    Here are the two Horseshoe loads.

    FTM-PTB
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  4. #4
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    At my career FD our 200' 1 3/4" preconnects are loaded flat with the top 100 feet bundled. the nozzleperson takes the bundle and heads to the fire, the second person empties the bed and lays out the line on the way in. Additional hose includes 2-500" beds of 2 1/2 loaded accordian. One is hooked to a gated wye and has a 150' 1 3/4" bundle hooked to it. The other has 100' of 2 1/2" bundled and connected tothe 500'. We also have 600-800' of 5 inch, depending on the rig, loaded flat.

    My volly FD has two 200' 2" crosslays loaded flat with ears, one 300' 2" rear preconnect loaded flat with ears, a 100' 1 3/4" rear preconnect (trashline) loaded flat, a deadload of 400' of 3" with a gated wye and 100' of 2", 200' of 3" preconnected with an Elkhart Stinger attached. We also have 1000' of 5" hose flat loaded for supply.

    Personally I like the Minute Man load. A flat load with ears is a close second. The one problem I have with the triple fold is this, it works best if you can pull it straight out of the bed, particularly if you have to advance it by yourself.

    Hose loads are like so much else in this business, you have to try them and use the one that works best for your situation.`

    FyredUp

  5. #5
    Forum Member firenresq77's Avatar
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    We use the Minuteman for crosslays, flat for the LDH, and the 2.5/3" depends on the vehicle and whether or not it is pre-connect or dead lay

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    We use the triple pack for crosslays (two 1-3/4 per engine and one 2-1/2). It's nice to pull, especially if we are undermanned, but still needs to be checked for kinks by the backup man. Everybody in our department hates to re-rack the load though, and it's almost impossible to do on scene since it takes so much room to set it up.

    Our supply line is flat loaded.

  7. #7
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    We use the Minuteman for the crosslays (preconnected), flat load for supply line (LDH), and a modified Minuteman for the 2.5" (also preconnected). The trash line is sort of an odd hodgepodge of Minuteman & a donut roll, but I have to admit it works fairly well.

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber arhaney's Avatar
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    Triple lay on our 1.75 crosslays, 100'of 1.5 on the side for the trash line.
    Chief
    Wren Volunteer Fire Department
    IACOJ
    Southern Division

    http://www.wrenfiredepartment.4t.com/

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    1946-2005
    "Rest in peace James, you now have the ultimate set of wings on you."

    Thanks, LeuitEFDems

  9. #9
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    Default

    All our preconnects are triple packed. The bomb line and supply line are flat packed.

  10. #10
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    On our engine we use the triple pack on the 200' 1.75" crosslays, 150' 1.75" and 300' 2.5" accordianed preconnected in the front bumper, 250' 2.5" w/ blitzfire and 600' 2.5" preconnected off the rear both flat packed with loops every 100-150', 2000' 3" flat packed dead, 2000' 5" flat packed in twin 1000' beds set up to be laid as duals or in a single string. The rescue pumper is the same with only 1 2.5" line and it only packs 1500' of 5" with no 3". On our brush unit we had to pack the 1200' of 3" in an accordian due to the short hosebed length (just over 5') it kept wanting to walk out the back of the bed in a flat pack, the 1200' of 1" is flat packed in a bin with a cover to keep it from leaving unexpectantly, 200' 1.75" flat packed with 2 loops.

  11. #11
    **THIS SPACE FOR RENT** Doo600's Avatar
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    Talking

    Triple layered 250' which is a fantastic load. It does have to be checked for kinks but much better than untangling spaghetti. Load is different to reload until you get the hang of it. Now I can load it anywhere in just as fast as a flat load.

  12. #12
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    We utilize flat loads with ears relatively every 100'for preconnected crosslays. There has been some trial with triple folds on our trucks but there were issues so we reverted back to the flat load. The supply loads are all flat loads.

    An additional point not yet mentioned about the triple fold... in addition to the space consideration for deployement and kink issues, is that the triple fold line needs to be fully deployed to use any of it. Whereas a flat load, despite being preconnected, can be pulled to the desired length, uncoupled and hooked into a free discharge - avoiding unneeded spaghetti messes.

  13. #13
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    We have 7 attack lines on our apparatus.

    3- 1 3/4" 200' attack lines in a Tripple load.
    2- Rear 1 3/4" 200' attack line in a Tripple load wyed off to 3"
    1- Front bumper 1 3/4" 100' trash line, Flat loaded
    1- Rear 3" 200' blitz line, with additional hose if needed (800')
    Ane we carry 1000' of 5" supply line, Flat loaded with couplings loaded to the front.

  14. #14
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    We have three preconnects on our engines two 150' 1 3/4 , and one 100' 1 1/2 trash line. All loaded triple layer, and 1500' 3 in supply line loaded flat. The 150' length works for 90% of our fires so we improvise for the other 10%.
    "Bravery is the capacity to perform properly even when scared half to death."

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  15. #15
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    My engine company has a pre-connected line on the front bumper we use for Auto accidents thats a 1" 3/4 accordion style, two(200 and 250 ft long) 1" 3/4 lines on the back going left to right with a top donut for each. We also got about two/three lines of 2" and a nice long supply line in the rear. Not sure of the length on the 2" and supply line.

  16. #16
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    Default Our Loads

    Our front bumper has 200 feet of 1 3/4. The first 150 feet are flaked in the "box," the last 50 feet is a donut roll. This is a modification of a load I saw in Fire Engineering a year or so back (the Kentland Rack). The nozzleman grabs the donut roll and runs, the driver flakes out the rest. Works well for our situation. The other 2 1 3/4 preconnects are triple-loaded. The 2 1/2" lines are flat loaded.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Our Loads

    Originally posted by phyrngn
    Our front bumper has 200 feet of 1 3/4. The first 150 feet are flaked in the "box," the last 50 feet is a donut roll. This is a modification of a load I saw in Fire Engineering a year or so back (the Kentland Rack). The nozzleman grabs the donut roll and runs, the driver flakes out the rest. Works well for our situation.
    Tried to use the Kentland rack at my department but was told no because "even though it's faster to deploy, it would be too hard to put away"

    Anyways, maybe I will attempt it again with this load. Thanks phyrngn.
    FTM-PTB-DTRT

  18. #18
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    Cool WTFD

    WTFD...it took some getting used to for some of our guys, too...they didn't mind, though, when we told them it was easier than the triple-load!!! HEE HEE

  19. #19
    Forum Member VinnieB's Avatar
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    We use a similar layout as FFFRED...Left to right...400' of 2.5", (50' lengths), 300' 1.75" over 600" of 2.5", 1000' of 4"(10 lengths), and another bed of 300 over 600 combination...we have no preconnects except for the bumper..50' of 1.75" w/ 50' of add'l 1.75 rolled under it. We only have 2 engines and both are layed out the same...we are also volunteer but we trained everyone to stretch the same way as FFFRED stated earlier....and it works well for us....We got ride of preconnects in about 1999-2000...stretching short is a serious problem because we have ALOT of apartment buildings and we adjusted our operations to address this problem. Our new apparatus was spec'd out without any preconnects except for the bumper.

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