1. #1
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    Default Machine Entrapment

    Checking if anybody would have any kind of info on a "man in machine kit". We just had a large commercial laundry plant open in our area and are looking to prepare ourselves. I found one under FDNY rescue 2 that lists a few tools they use. We have the sawzalls, porta spreaders, hand tools and other items. Just looking for some elaboration on functions. If this needs to be under another topic or if there are threads on this let me know. Searched high and low and couldn't find much on this type of rescue.

    Thanks in advance!!

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    You may want to look into some airbags and their uses with machinery also.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    We don't carry any specific kit for this purpose, but based on a passed experience with a guy caught in a conveyor belt, the first thing I asked my guys to bring in was the tool box. With some crescent wrenches and box wrenches we were able to dis-assemble a section and adjust the tension of the rollers in another section and free the victim.

    My advice for your situation.... since the place is new in town, pre-plan the heck out of it. Get in the place and see the equipment first hand and picture what you would do based on what you see. Try some wrench sizes out, see if they will fit. If possible get a service tech. from the equipment manufacturer out to give you some tips and hints. If the place is really that new and the equipment is as well, perhaps the service guys are in and out often make some start-up adjustments to the equipment and you could setup a meeting with them.

    Hope this helps a bit!

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    As above when dealing with machinery accidents have two well stocked toolboxes.One between your ears(preplan,product familiarity,factory staff/maintenance people)and the other with a sufficent supply of hand tools,ratchets,sockets,screwdrivers,prybars etc.Along with all the other stuff we use for every other rescue.T.C.

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    Make sure you determine whether it is standard sizes or metric sizes when getting wrenchs. Also, a set of punches are usually very helpful, alot of equipment have things that are pinned and you need to knock the pins out.
    Work Hard
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    EFFD131

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    And your own tagout/lockout kit or someone you can *trust* (i.e. not the 18 year old probie you don't have another use for) to standby at the controls.
    IACOJ Canine Officer
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    I agree with all of the replies so far. Tools kits are the biggest thing you should have on hand. There is also one other thing that may help in a big way someday, and we carry it all the time. And that is a ring cutter, to cut rings off of someone's hand.

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    I took a farm extrication course and some tools to think about:

    air regulator for scba bottles
    3/8 drive air ratchet
    1/2 heavy duty inpact gun
    3 or 4 diffent size bottle jacks
    small oxy/acetlene cutting set
    lots of cribing


    this is some of things that we used in the course. the air wrenches made quick work of taking apart any machine.

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    Also include things like:

    Limbs in drains/plugs, etc-
    * x-ray film to slide down around wedged limbs
    * vegetable oil to lube the limbs in the x-ray film
    * shoe horn or similar to introduce a bit of air under the limb to assist with sliding the limb out

    Also think about the sort of tools required to work in tight confined areas such as-
    * telescopic adjustable mirrors for those hard to see things
    * telescopic magnets (nothing worse than dropping a tool out of reach
    * small hacksaws (ie: the ones that hold the blade in a handle with no arch for those tight areas)
    * Consider a Dremmel also
    Luke

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    If you're going to use a air impact for anything outside of a couple of nuts,you probably better carry a "gang"manifold for your air bottles.By nature air tools require quite a lot of air and a single scba bottle won't power them very long with any power.They need volume as well as pressure.VERY handy but a little thinking up front will help ensure your long term success.Farm medic is a nice bit of instruction,helps you think outside of the box.Another handy tool is the Jackmate,Tim over to Rescue 42 sells them and they're handier than pockets in a shirt.T.C.

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    Another thing to consider is: don't be afraid to make use of the plant personnel, particularly maintenance folks. May not be many in the laundry you mention, but big industrial plants often have several people you can call on. They usually know the machinery inside and out and have any special tools that are needed to work on it.

    They may also have special emergency training. Back when I worked as the Safety Engineer for a local newspaper, most of our maintenance staff were on the company Emergency Response Team. They all had at least basic FA/CPR training, and several had First Responder. Also HazMat FRO and incipient firefighting training.

    If you have the time to pre-plan, definitely make sure some of those folks are involved. Find out what the likely incidents are and game it out with them.
    Chris Gaylord
    Emergency Planner / Fire Captain, UC Santa Cruz FD

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