1. #1
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    Jesika's Avatar
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    Question Electric Vehicles

    My department is getting ready to do a vehicle extrication class on electric vehicles. I was wondering if any of you have been on accidents involving this type of vehicle and if you have any pointers or information that I could pass on to my fellow firefighters. Any information would be of help and greatly appreciated. You can reply on here or you can send it to me at jesika@firehousemail.com. Thanks for the help.

    Jesika Leigh
    Wheatland Twp. Fire and Rescue
    Remus Michigan
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting that vote." -Benjamin franklin

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    Cool

    Nope, Most of the vehicles around these parts run off of gas or desiel oil. There are some that uses lp but haven't seen any them electric ones yet. I guess you would have to have a long electric cord hook to the car.

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    Go to Toyota's website and look for their Emergency Response Guide. Has all the information you will want.

    I guess you would have to have a long electric cord hook to the car.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Hmmmm, let me see...

    Trains are diesel/electric, but I have not come across any info on special fire service techniqes. And we have not had an engine catch fire completely, just some small parts of them, little stuff.

    The Toyota and Honda hybrids DO store some pretty high voltage from what I gather. There is a lot of potential for realy big sparking/fire and I dont know how the airbags are run, off the BIG battery or what.

    I dont know how you diconnect those big frigging batteries?

    Let us know!
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    Shutting off and removing the key is "supposed" to de-energize the high voltage system. That is the only way. There are supposed to be many other internal safety checks for the power to be on, but once a car is involved in accident/fire, all guarantees are off.

    Airbags run off the 12volt system same as most other cars. Disconnecting that battery will de-energize the airbags.


    Avoid the big orange cable in the engine compartment, that's the high voltage line.
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    Bones- I looked for the Emergency Response Guide on Toyota's website and could not find it. Do you know what section it's in?

    When I was in high school, we had a electric/hybrid vehicle that we ran in the Tour De Sol (an alternative energy vehicle race run each year in the Northeast) There were 20 12V batteries that powered the engine and a propane powered engine that recharged the batteries. For safety we had to put a manual disconnect that physically disconnected the high voltage from the engine. It was in the engine compt and not back by the batteries (we converted an 86 S-10 and the batteries were in the bed) If I remember correctly...the rules stated it had to be in the engine compt. We also had to install an Ansul type system for the propane engine. Granted these vehicles were "home builts" and not mass produced with all the safety features of the hybrids today...with the exception of Toyota's electric Rav4 which was 2 years old when I graduated. I am very interested to see the safety features on the mass produced hybrids. Hopefully they are alot safer than the ones we raced.
    The comments made by me are my opinions only, not of the Fire and EMS services I am affiliated with.

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    Thank you all for all the help so far. More is surely welcomed and greatly appreciated. I read and article a couple of days ago, it stated that if something goes wrong that all power in the vehicle is suppose to shut off, including the high voltage cable. But it is not guranteed to do so.

    I will try to locate that article so that you guys can check it out if you want to. It was part of an interview from a gentleman who works for Toyota.

    Thanks again
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting that vote." -Benjamin franklin

    "There is nothing wrong with America that can not be cured with what is right with America" -Henry Clay

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    Hopefully they are alot safer than the ones we raced.
    Nope. No manual cut off other than the key. No access to the high voltage batteries at all.

    I also went looking for the ERG today and also on the Honda site. Can't seem to find them out there anymore. You can also go to most dealers and ask about the guides. We got some a ways back from our local Honda dealer.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Just wanted to thank everyone who contrubuted information. If any body else has any you are more than welcome to send it to me.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting that vote." -Benjamin franklin

    "There is nothing wrong with America that can not be cured with what is right with America" -Henry Clay

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    Default Toyota Website

    Go to http://techinfo.toyota.com/ and then click the emergency responder information link. The web address is goofy and may or may not work on the first try but has good info. Honda has a brochure for their Hybrid vehicles but they are currently out of stock. Call Honda's customer rep. at (800) 999-1009 to order a brochure when they get some more printed. Hope this helps.

    -Karl

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    I found some of what I was looking for on that web site and I recommend it to others. If anybody else has some web sites or personal experience to sure it is appreciated.

    Thank you again
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting that vote." -Benjamin franklin

    "There is nothing wrong with America that can not be cured with what is right with America" -Henry Clay

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    Jesika go to the archives in the university of extrication july 2001, aug 2001, and sept 2001....hope this helps you. I found these very informative.

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    Default Links!

    Much of our fire district is freeways and interchanges, so we've done some detective work on the hybrid/Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) stuff. Here are the links to the emergency responder guides for the 1st and 2nd Generation Toyota Prius and Honda Insight. The Toyota ones also touch on airbag locations, airbag sensor locations, and time the airbags remain armed after power is cut.

    (You gotta have Adobe Acrobat Reader on your computer for these to work)

    Toyota Prius Hybrid (1st Generation: 2001-2003 Model Years)
    http://techinfo.toyota.com/public/main/1stprius.pdf

    Toyota Prius Hybrid (2nd Generation: 2004 Model Year)
    http://techinfo.toyota.com/public/main/2ndprius.pdf

    Honda Insight Hybrid
    http://www.insightcentral.net/_files/_pdf/erg.pdf



    Also, here are some other Alternative Fuel Vehicle Emergency Responder Guides:

    Toyota Rav4 EV (Electric Vehicle)
    http://techinfo.toyota.com/public/main/rav4ev.pdf

    Toyota Camry CNG (Compressed Natural Gas)
    http://techinfo.toyota.com/public/main/cng.pdf

    Toyota FCHV (Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle)
    http://techinfo.toyota.com/public/main/fchverg.pdf

    I'm still looking for Domestic AFV Emergency Response Guides (Ford CNG Vehicles, etc.) and if I come across any in the near future, I'll post them. Ford is supposed to release a Hybrid version of the Escape SUV soon, and maybe they'll put out an ERG for it. Till then, Hazmat training may help, especially for CNG and Fuel Cell vehicle incidents.

    Hope this helps! Stay Safe!

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