Thread: Fires IN BC...

  1. #1
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    Exclamation Fires IN BC...

    This is the page for the BC GovernmentWildfire Protect . I think that you will find it rather interesting on the amount of the fires that have been around here so far!
    Firefighters are beneficial to every community with the wealth of information they have!

    They don't get enough praise, for the information and skills they know! It could save your life one day!!!!!

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    We would find preventions interesting, yes.

    But the ones that get away cost the taxpayer the
    most money and get all the attention and any wildfire,
    killed with any aircraft, pays for that aircraft for
    an entire summer.

    BC has wildfires going now that are getting media attention:

    CTV: British Columbia's wildfire season heats up

    and from CBC: B.C. fire threatens homes


    This is hearsay. For what it's worth:

    Trusted aviation sources in Kelowna, British Columbia
    said two things about last season's BC wildfire debacle:

    (a) they said BC Forest Service personnel
    bad-mouthed the IL-76 waterbomber when asked about it;

    (b) they said, knowing

    (1) STOL flight characteristics of the IL-76 waterbomber and

    (2) locations of the most destructive BC fires,

    fighting the biggest fires in Kelowna last summer would have been a piece of cake for the IL-76.

    Here's a NATO photo of the aircraft: http://www.nato.int/pictures/2002/020925b/b020925g.jpg

    Here's an aircraft photographer's site with his collection
    from an Austrian airshow. In his words, the demo by the IL-76
    was by far the most spectacular at that airshow:
    http://www.checksix.de/html/body_solodemos.html
    Last edited by budthespud; 06-20-2004 at 10:33 AM.

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    Post Speaking of B.C. Fires....

    Evacuation alerts issued as Canadian forest fire grows

    (Vancouver, British Columbia-AP) -- A forest fire in the
    Lillooet area north of Vancouver, British Columbia, doubled in size
    to 741 acres today from yesterday.
    Canadian authorities have put 200 people in the area on an
    evacuation alert.
    A fire information officer says the alert covers 89 houses, most
    of which are on the Bridge River Indian Reserve, 186 miles north of
    Vancouver.
    The blaze is about 220 yards from some houses. But the steep
    terrain in which the blaze is growing means the fire cannot move
    directly toward the residences.
    About 120 personnel are fighting the fire.

    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

    APTV 06-20-04 2314EDT
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    Evacuation alerts issued as Canadian forest fire grows
    cpdgb1
    VANCOUVER, British Columbia (AP) - Two hundred people in the
    Lillooet area north of Vancouver, British Columbia, were under an
    evacuation alert Sunday as the Dickie Creek blaze continued to
    grow.
    The fire was sparked by lightning on Friday and doubled in size
    to 741 acres since Saturday.
    "It's a very challenging fire and is exhibiting aggressive
    behavior," said Nancy Argyle, a spokeswoman for the B.C. Ministry
    of Forests.
    Fire information officer Kevin Matuga said the alert covers 89
    houses, most of which are on the Bridge River Indian Reserve, 186
    miles north of Vancouver.
    The blaze was about 220 yards from some houses but the steep
    terrain in which the blaze is growing means the fire cannot move
    directly toward the residences, said Argyle.
    About 120 personnel are fighting the fire, one of three in the
    region, Matuga said.
    People could be told to leave their homes with as little as an
    hour's notice.
    "We tell people to get their belongings together and maybe have
    some items in the car and be ready to go," Argyle said, adding
    that further alerts may be issued.
    Much of the province continued to experience a heat wave Sunday
    and lightning continues to spark fires in the Kamloops and
    Tweedsmuir Park areas.
    "The weather forecast does not look favorable for the next
    week," she said. "They're getting ignitions from just about every
    lightning strike.
    "It could be a very, very busy week for us. It just depends
    what the weather does."
    Harold James of Lillooet watched planes circle the Dickie Creek
    fire as he waited for the evacuation order on Sunday.
    "It's heating up," he said. "There's a lot of smoke here. The
    adrenalin's there."
    By Sunday afternoon, 54 fires had started during the weekend in
    B.C. compared to 26 in 2003. To date, there have been 426 fires,
    compared to 400 for the same period last year.
    The fires may foreshadow a hot summer ahead for B.C. residents
    who still have fresh memories of the massive wildfires that burned
    out of control in the B.C. southern interior last year.
    More than 300 homes were destroyed and about 30,000 residents
    were evacuated when wildfires lit up the skies around Kamloops and
    Kelowna.

    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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    Post June 21st

    Canadian town on alert as forest fire rages
    VANCOUVER, British Columbia (Reuters) - About
    1,500 residents in Lillooet, British Columbia, were on alert
    for possible evacuation Monday as crews struggled to contain
    a wildfire fueled by years of dry weather.
    The blaze about 200 km (130 miles) northeast of Vancouver
    is the first to prompt a major evacuation alert this season,
    and it comes amid warnings that the western Canadian province
    faces a repeat of last year's devastating wildfires.
    The fire was started last week by a lightning strike and
    was one of two burning in the rugged mountains near Lillooet,
    which is in the Fraser Canyon. It has not caused any injuries
    or destroyed homes yet, forestry officials said.
    Fire crews said they need rain to put the fire out, but
    none was in the immediate forecast. "This fire is not going to
    put itself out," B.C. Forest Service spokesman Kevin Matuga
    told a radio interviewer
    REUTERS
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    Default #49 of 50 reasons why Russia still matters

    The Ilyushin-76:

    These giant forest-fire-fighting planes can hold 11,000 gallons... that's over 4 times more water than any other firefighting aircraft. That's enough to put out a four-acre blaze in one run. Or enough to cover an entire stadium full of Promise Keepers with dog semen. Whatever. The point is, they're sure to come in handy when global warming turns even the once lush Pacific Northwest into a tinderbox. http://www.exile.ru/189/feature_story.html

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    But wait!

    Ontario is coming to save the day with
    four (count 'em) FOUR (4) scoopers.

    Six (6) more and they can equal the load
    from a single IL-76!

    Trouble is, they can't lay down line in
    perfect sequence as they would need to
    do to equal the drop from a single Ilyushin.

    The BC Forest Service would like to thank the
    US Forest Service for providing it with a full
    set of excuses, up until September '03* rattled
    off with some frequency on why not to use the
    Il-76.

    The BC Forest Service will now want to toe
    the line on conversions of two North American
    passenger aircraft to the asymmetrical bombing
    role being proposed to the Service.

    * http://www.fire.uni-freiburg.de/medi...0030905_us.htm
    Last edited by budthespud; 06-22-2004 at 10:48 AM.

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    Question

    Okay. I've listened to your cheerleading for the IL-76 in numerous posts. With all due respect, what drives your desire and fascination to have Canada and/or the United States bring these foreign built waterbombers into service in North America?

    You seems to be exhibiting a "passion" of some kind, for this aircraft. Frankly, I don't care if they outfit 747s, 757s, 777s, 767s, A340s L10-11s, C-130s, DC10s or MD80s......just as long as they get the ball rolling on newer, safer aircraft for our firefighting efforts.

    Maybe I've missed it somewhere...but you sound as if you've piloted the big birds? Have you had some experience with them?

    NJ
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    Question

    Budthespud

    Please assure me that your location is just pure coincidence...with the location of the IL-76 Rep in Calgary. You almost sound like a salesperson for the product. Eh?

    Total Corporate Aviation Services Ltd.
    Tom Edmison, President
    700, 933 17th Ave. SW
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2T 5R6
    phone: 1-403-244-9300
    fax: 1-403-245-6227
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    Thanks for listening.

    Only one firefighting aircraft North America's not using now
    can be ordered up like a pizza - the IL-76.

    FEMA ordered a pair of IL-76 waterbombers in 2000 with the
    consent and approval of the White House (and others). Then,
    they were stood down by the Forest Service when the Forest
    Service pulled rank.

    When this story comes out fully, you'll understand.

    Once people see the IL-76, no other firefighting aircraft
    will do. And that's a damn shame. Any fire, killed with any
    aircraft pays for it for an entire season and all of them
    can be useful in the right role, as with any tool.

    Have you watched the IL-76 video here?

    http://www.mchs.gov.ru/mvideo.php?fi...57240970270863

    It's at #27.

    Oh, and here's a NATO photo: http://www.nato.int/pictures/2002/020925b/b020925g.jpg

    Thanks again for your interest in firefighting aviation.
    I'm grateful to you for keeping us lined up with wildland
    fire news you're posting here. I get mine from GoogleNews
    but it's good to have somebody edit them for you as there
    are so many fire stories and we all know this will be a wicked
    fire season in the west, especially with 33 large air tankers
    out of service for safety reasons.

    Cheers;
    bud,
    the spud

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    NB: An official Forest Service report from
    1995 says the IL-76 should be taken in as an
    Emergency Supplemental Air Tanker.

    This was shared with Canada. There is no excuse in
    Canada.

    The military in Canada was right behind Il-76
    but for jurisdictional reasons, they cannot
    help. The Canadian military will get on the end
    of a Pulaski when the groundpounders get tired,
    but you will never, ever, find a military man
    fuelling up a firefighting airplane.

    Dumb eh?

    Even the US has MAFFS.

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    Post June 23rd

    LILLOOET, B.C. (CP) - School's out, exams are off, graduation
    ceremonies are on hold and there's no tap water in local
    restaurants, but that's OK because Lillooet didn't burn to the
    ground.
    The village let up on its panic button Wednesday as airborne and
    ground firefighters announced they were successfully corralling a
    massive forest fire that threatened the desert-like Interior B.C.
    community for almost a week.
    But a one-hour evacuation alert issued to the area's 2,700
    residents stays in effect, said Ministry of Forests officials.
    And, as drought conditions fuel an earlier-than-expected fire
    season, it appears Lillooet is just the first of what could be many
    British Columbia communities threatened by wildfires this year as
    drought conditions fuel an earlier-than-expected forest fire
    season.
    "We're really getting a hold on it and with no unexpected
    weather or anything coming in I think we're going to make great
    progress in the next couple of days," said Karen Henderson, a
    Forests Ministry fire information officer.
    But as fire crews continued to win their battle against the big
    fire on the community's north side, smoke started billowing west of
    town, signalling a new fire.
    Forestry officials said afternoon breezes whipped up a fire at
    nearby Seton Lake, about seven kilometres west of Lillooet.
    The small fire does not threaten homes or area recreational
    properties, but it's located in steep terrain and difficult to
    fight, said Steve Newton, the Forests Ministry's Lillooet fire zone
    manager.
    "It's kicking up a lot of smoke and taking a run for the top of
    the hill," he said. "We were working it as best we can, and
    observing and it just kicked up this afternoon during the daytime
    heating."
    The lightning storm that started the other Lillooet fires last
    week is also responsible for the Seton Lake fire, Newton said.
    Despite the ever-present smoke cloud over Lillooet and the
    flying ash, a sense of relief started to build on the community's
    Main Street where people routinely stop their pickups in traffic to
    hold conversations with passing motorists.
    Vivian Birch-Jones, a disc jockey at CHLS Radio Lillooet, the
    community's volunteer and student-run radio station, said fear was
    in the air earlier in the week.
    She said she was on a night shift Saturday trying to provide
    fire information to listeners when the blaze crested the mountain
    ridge above town and the flames shot skyward.
    "I'm working the radio and taking phone calls and trying to
    provide up-to-date information and one guy phoned and he went, `Get
    out!"' Birch-Jones said.
    "I had to say `Thank you' and hang up and keep kind of calmly
    broadcasting. But it was a bad moment."
    Most residents say they've taken the evacuation warning
    seriously and packed their valuables and made arrangements for
    saving pets and livestock.
    "My truck's sitting at home, parked packed, and if they give us
    an hour we're gone," said Andrew Thue.
    At the Reynolds Hotel, a local watering hole and restaurant,
    Lillooet residents displayed a sense of humour as dry as the local
    mountains.
    "The guys with the (marijuana) grow-ops, they're actually
    working now fighting the fire," said one customer. "They have to
    protect their crops."
    Another customer described the efforts of the ground
    firefighters who have been fighting the fire with fire by burning
    the fuel path slightly ahead of the flames, forcing the flames to
    burn into a prepared guard.
    It's almost war-like, he said.
    "It's like Vietnam out there with their flame throwers," he
    said.
    Waitress Tammy Cook said the sudden influx of firefighters
    cleaned out the restaurant's menu.
    Before ordering, she warns: "There's no pork chops, Salisbury
    steak, liver and onions or stir fry and I can only sell you bottled
    water because there's a boil water advisory due to all the stuff
    they're throwing on the fire."
    High school teacher Tom Willey said the fire put several
    important school dates on hold, but plans are in the works to
    extend the school year to finish exams and hold a graduation
    ceremony.
    The Lillooet secondary school class of 2004 was set to graduate
    Friday.
    "If we get word from the Forests Ministry that we can go back
    to our regular lives here then we'll move the graduation ceremonies
    a little farther down the line," Willey said.
    "It's a big event here in Lillooet, the graduation of the LSS
    graduating class," he said.
    "Everybody wants to see them walk."
    Newton said the Forests Ministry is planning a townhall meeting
    Thursday to explain the fire situation to Lillooet residents.

    "The more they know the better informed they are, the more
    rational they are, less emotional," he said. "I've learned that
    from lots of experience from lots of communities that have been
    threatened."
    Henderson said fire crews have the Lillooet fire 45 per cent
    contained and every hour of low winds and lightning-free skies is
    making their job easier.
    Helicopters carrying large buckets can be seen scooping water
    from the nearby Fraser River and flying behind the mountain toward
    the fire.
    Firefighters on the ground are building guard walls to contain
    the blaze, Henderson said.
    "We're digging in deeper and deeper into the fire."
    Almost 225 people are fighting the fire along with 14
    helicopters and 27 pieces of heavy equipment, Henderson said.
    Fire officials in Lillooet and across British Columbia are
    pulling out all the stops - enforcing provincewide open fire bans
    and outlawing campfires in the driest areas.
    The fires that devastated British Columbia's Interior region
    last summer, destroying neighbourhoods in Kelowna and the entire
    community of Louis Creek, didn't hit until August.
    Crews and air support from Ontario, Saskatchewan, Manitoba,
    Alberta and Montana have been requested to help with the 260 fires
    burning in British Columbia, more than double the amount at the
    same time last year.
    In northwest B.C., 375 people remained on evacuation alert as a
    fire near Terrace grew five times its original size to
    one-half-square-kilometre in one night.
    Near Vanderhoof, a 30-square-kilometre wildfire has forced the
    evacuation of a logging camp and one home.


    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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    Last year, although it didn't become a true crisis until August, B.C. registered the worst fire season in its history. Some towns were heavily damaged by blazes, with one town losing its sawmill, a major employer. Some subdivisions in Kelowna were also consumed.

    In total, more than 334 homes were destroyed, 45,000 people evacuated and about 2,605 square kilometres destroyed by fire. The total cost was $700 million.

    http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNew...hub=TopStories

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    LILLOOET, B.C. (CP) - Police are prepared to arrest residents
    here who disobey the potential order to evacuate this Interior B.C.
    village currently threatened by forest fires, a town hall meeting
    was told Thursday.
    Local RCMP and tribal officers said once an evacuation order is
    given for Lillooet they won't tolerate people trying to stay behind
    to protect their property.
    The blunt message was greeted with a round of applause by the
    more than 200 people who attended a fire information meeting at the
    local ice arena.
    Lillooet and its 2,700 residents have been under a one-hour
    evacuation alert since Sunday, and even though the major fire
    burning above the community is 45 per cent contained the Forests
    Ministry says it's still too risky to lift the alert.
    "We can't allow one person to jeopardize the whole town," RCMP
    Cpl. Bill Melanson said.
    "I don't want to see anybody die who felt they could save their
    house. Leave that to the firefighters, that's their job." Arrests
    are heavy-handed, he said, but "if someone's impeding the
    firefighters from doing their work we have no other choice." Tom
    Karanfilis, Stl'atl'imx Tribal Police chief, said his force and the
    RCMP have worked out two sets of evacuation plans, one that allows
    for a timed evacuation and another in case a quick escape is
    required.
    Karanfilis, a 26-year veteran of the Toronto police, said the
    evacuation includes every area resident and will be as orderly and
    panic free as it can be.
    Police officers from across B.C. will be in Lillooet to seal off
    the community and protect property from looters, he said.
    "But we're not going to feed your fish," said Karanfilis.
    Lillooet residents were told the forest fires burning north,
    south and west of their communities are currently rated as the
    top-priority fires in the province.
    "It's my job to control this fire and prevent it from taking
    out this community," said Larry Osachoff, the chief commander of
    the Forests Ministry's fire brigade.
    Lillooet resident Iona Napoleon, who lives on a Lillooet
    aboriginal reserve located just below a major branch of the fire,
    said the detailed evacuation plans left her feeling confident she
    and her three children could safely escape the blaze.
    "That wind up there is just so fast and it comes down right
    into Lillooet and I just needed to know that they can get us out,"
    she said.
    Earlier, Randy Frank, a B.C. Forests Ministry forest fire
    expert, said the pecking order for fighting forest fires is
    simple.
    Life and property come first, everything else waits and depends
    on available resources, said Frank as he stood on a rock bluff
    north of here and watched trees burst into flames.
    Protection of the village of Lillooet - surrounded by mountains,
    pine forests and desert-like sagebrush and grass - from fires
    burning to the north, south and east of the Interior B.C. community
    is the top priority of the more than 200 firefighters stationed
    here, he said.
    "The resources are placed in priorities and No. 1 is life and
    property," Frank said.
    Helicopters carrying buckets of water and fire retardant
    constantly hover over mountains near the community and pickup
    trucks carrying firefighters pass through Lillooet 24 hours a day
    as crews change shifts.
    A fierce lightning storm last weekend sparked 13 forest fires in
    the area and flames were seen shooting from the mountain tops above
    the community.
    Schools have been closed since Monday. Provincial exams
    scheduled for this week are on hold and the community's 70 Grade
    12s will have to wait an extra week before they can graduate from
    high school.
    Lillooet is under a boil water advisory, because helicopters are
    dropping buckets of fire retardant on hot spots near the
    community's watershed.
    Most residents say they've packed their belongings and taken
    care of their pets and livestock just in case they are told to
    flee.
    The Lillooet fire is among 300 wildfires currently burning
    across British Columbia. At this time last year, 101 forest fires
    were reported, leading Ministry of Forests officials to speculate
    the province is heading for another disastrous summer fire season.
    Frank surveyed the northern flank of the Lillooet fire and
    despite seeing trees in flames, he proclaimed the area relatively
    safe. The white-coloured smoke that's been blanketing the community
    and carrying ash is an indication of slow moving fire, he said.
    "At this time this fire's in a really safe mode," Frank said.
    "It's backing down against the wind. It's working its way down
    through the vegetation that's mixed through in the shale here."

    Threats to Lillooet by forest fires are nothing new to the
    community, said Steve Newton, Lillooet's Forests Ministry fire zone
    officer.
    "It's part of our life here," he said. "What we're looking at
    here in the southern Interior, the dry belt, is that a lot of the
    tree species and plant species around here need fire to start their
    life.
    "Fire generates heat that allows the pine cones from the pine
    trees to germinate and create new forests.
    "Anywhere from seven to 15 years a fire has gone through here
    quite regularly."
    In 1971, a fire ravaged much of Lillooet, destroying homes on an
    aboriginal reserve and in the community and forcing the evacuation
    of the local hospital.
    Aggie Malm said the flames in 1971 were like a volcano coming
    down the mountainside. She said she only had enough time to put her
    children and a neighbour's children in a vehicle before fleeing for
    her life.
    All that was left of the family home was its frame when she
    returned the next day, she said.
    Signs praising the efforts of the firefighters - Firefighters
    Kick Ash and Heartfelt Thanks - started going up throughout town
    Thursday.
    Yellow ribbons acknowledging the efforts of the firefighters are
    being worn by people and tied to trees and signposts.


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    I've read through this, and here's my take: Call it pride, or whatever. There is an overwhelming majority of us, (I include myself) who are opposed to bringing foreign Aircraft to North America. I am also very dubious of the claims made for the 747 conversion. BIG aircraft have BIG limitations.
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    PORT ALBERNI, B.C. (CP) - British Columbia's Mars water bombers
    have logged twice as many operational hours so far this year
    compared to the same period for 2003.
    But recent rainfall on most of the province has damped down the
    overall fire hazard for the moment, said Flying Tankers manager
    Terry Dixon.
    After dousing a forestry cutblock fire near Vancouver Island's
    Port Renfrew Wednesday, the big birds were back at the base on
    Sproat Lake Friday.
    But, said Dixon, Vancouver Island remains a potential hot spot.
    "The province has been getting lots of rain, except from about
    Campbell River to Victoria. We've also been getting a record number
    of lightning strikes, but the rain has been preventing too many
    fire starts," he said.
    As of Sunday afternoon, there were 401 fires burning in the
    province with crews gaining headway against the larger blazes.
    The 1,500-hectare Botanie fire near Lytton was 50 per cent
    contained with 119 firefighters working on containment lines.
    Evacuation alerts were lifted late Sunday afternoon for
    residents around Seton Lake 200 kilometres northeast of Vancouver
    after 85 firefighters and six helicopters contained 25 per cent of
    the 967-hectare blaze.
    "The Office of the Fire Commissioner in consultation with the
    Ministry of Forests has determined that the imminent risk of danger
    to life and properties from the Seton Lake and Town Creek fires has
    diminished at this time," a government release said.
    The Coal River fire, which closed the Alaska Highway on the
    B.C.-Yukon border last week, has burned about 26,000 hectares.
    Evacuated residents have been allowed to return home but remain on
    voluntary evacuation alert.
    The cost of fighting fires so far this year is estimated at
    $48.7 million.
    After the near-apocalyptic fire season of 2003, in which the
    Mars water-bombers logged more hours than in any previous season,
    the B.C. Forest Service has taken steps to put equipment closer to
    where serious fires are anticipated.
    "They sent us out to Vernon for a day, because they were
    expecting heavy winds. But that didn't materialize," Dixon said.
    Dixon said last year's fire season, in which the Mars put in
    nearly 250 operational hours between them, didn't really get
    rolling until well into July.
    "Last year at this time, we were about 15 hours. This year,
    we're just north of 40," Dixon said.
    TimberWest, which owns the Port Renfrew cutblock where last
    week's fire broke out, is the single corporate partner in the
    Flying Tankers program. The company depends on contract work from
    various provincial and state agencies to keep the giant Second
    World War flying boats in the air.
    At 27,000 litres per drop, the Mars has four times the carrying
    capacity of its nearest competitor.
    (Alberni Valley Times)


    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  17. #17
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    Post July 26th

    VANCOUVER (CP) - Wildfires in B.C's Interior have destroyed an
    historical ranch and forced about 50 residents to flee.
    An evacuation order was issued Monday for roughly 30 homes at
    Charlotte Lake, about 90 kilometres east of Bella Coola.
    A growing, 3,700-hectare blaze known as the Lonesome Lake/Turner
    Lake fire prompted the evacuation.
    At Crazy Bear Lake Lodge, seven U.S. tourists and four staff
    were picked up by helicopter and float plane and whisked to Anahim
    Lake airport.
    "Everybody's been evacuated," said lodge booking agent Janice
    Mattheis. "If the fire hits there, it's the lifetime dream and
    (owner Frank Naumann's) lifetime work wiped out."
    The lodge, like much in the remote area, is accessible only by
    float plane.
    "The fire is moving toward the community," said fire
    information officer Nancy Argyle. "It's a very volatile fire and
    exhibited some extreme fire behaviour."
    Mountainous terrain inaccessible to fire fighters is compounding
    the problem. The forest service is attacking with helicopters and
    water bombers.
    On Sunday, the fire also consumed an old symbol of pioneer days,
    the Edwards Homestead.
    Ralph Edwards hand-built the barn and lodge on Lonesome Lake in
    the 1920s, which was made famous through the 1957 book, Crusoe of
    Lonesome Lake, by Leland Stowe.
    John Edwards, Ralph's 77-year-old son, stayed to protect the
    family home even in the face of the fire, but was evacuated on
    Friday.
    "We could feel the heat a quarter mile away," he told BCTV
    News on Global.
    A 23-person Swedish fire fighting team was dropped into the area
    to protect the ranch, but was evacuated less than a day later.
    Phyllis Irwin, owner of the Dean on Nimpo resort on Nimpo Lake
    just east of Charlotte Lake, said she saw large plumes of white
    smoke about 50 kilometres away.
    "Everyone is just watching and paying attention," she said.
    Meanwhile, an evacuation alert remains in effect for the
    Klinaklini Valley, 25 kilometres southwest of Clearwater Lake,
    after a fire there grew to 2,500 hectares and spread every
    direction but west.
    It's burning as close as two kilometres from cabins.
    There were 372 fires burning in B.C. Monday, compared to 156
    last year. About 454 firefighters, 62 helicopters and a fleet of
    air tankers are spread throughout B.C. and 62 more firefighters are
    expected to arrive soon from Ontario.
    B.C. has spent $73.4 million to date to fight fires, compared to
    $27 million this time last year.
    Environment Canada said there's little chance of rain and
    conditions will remain 5 C hotter than normal across the province.
    (Vancouver Province)


    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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