1. #1
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    Default Training Experiences

    Does anyone out there have any good or funny experiences during training? They can be funny, serious, I don't care, just curious for stories.
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    On one of our drill nights in 2003, we decided to go over procedure for response and operation on a working dwelling fire. One portion of the drill was for a 2+ Alarm fire. The drill lasted about 2 1/2 hours. About 4 In the morning (which was about 7 hours after the drill ended) we were banged out for a 2nd alarm response in our mutual aid area. we found that one to be a weird coincidence.
    Firefighter, Volunteering since Oct 2001

    CCFA 05-04, best overall class for 2005
    "GOOD GAME!"

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    My department has a small training building behind one of our stations. It basically is a obstacle course to go through with a blackout mask on when breathing air. It has everything from Low Profile, Emergency Escape, Stairs, Ramps, Toys laying around, Wires Hanging(Self Escape), and has some holes, and fun things that cause problems.
    Now for the story part. One of our guys who is a cadet was ging through and ended up falling down a set of about 5 steps/stairs.
    Another thing we did was we have a 150-200 Lb dummy inside to use as a customer. Well our advisor decided to throw in some extra things, me and my partner went through and he stopped us halfway in and said for one of us to lay down under the bunkbed thats in their and me to go into a corner between the bunkbed and the wall. So now their is two real men (Simulated fallen firefighters) and a dummy. The next crew came through finally got to the room. Now this room was about 5 or 6 ft in both directions. This crew decided to come down the ramp which led to the door and slid right into it forcing it to fly open, right into my partner. He screamed out "Ouch!" and the other crew didnt know what was going on and continued, they came into the room and the first two(Our First Lt. whos 17 and another guy who i believe is 13 or 14) of them found the dummy. They dragged out the dummy. The next two girls in the crew now came in. The first girl is 16 years old and the other was about 14. They came in and started looking around with their hand and the older one smacked my partner and didnt know what it was. She continued to swing her hand around trying to figure it out. By this time her hand is now swinging and repeatedly hitting my boot which was laying right by my partners head whos in front of the bed. She finally gets back to my partner and they finally realize its someone and drag him out. They dragged him up the ramp, and down 12 steps to the exit. I waited in my corner laying down in the same position for 5 more minutes and my advisor purposely went back outside to see what they were doing. He told me to come out in a minute if noone came. So a minute later I got up and walked out on my own. When I came out of the building and the three girls and the guy saw me, they all looked and said, "OOPS!". I turned to the girl that kept hitting my boot and said to her, "Remember that odd object?" and her reply was, "That was you?". We had a laugh out of that and we all never forgot it.

    Lesson Learned- COMPLETE THE SEARCH OF THE BUILDING AND ROOM! FIND A ODD OBJECT OR FEELING? CHECK IT!!!

    Hows that for a story?
    Mike
    Levittown, NY
    Cadet Corps Member
    1st Lieutenant

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    I don't have any really funny ones, but ones that were a good laugh at the time they happened.

    We have a 3-4 story training tower next to one of our firehouses and we were doing search and rescue practice in it for the first time. One of the advisor's kids volunteered to be the victim, he was maybe 7 or 8 years old. My partner and myself get up to the second floor and find him on the mattress. I led the way out but since the kid had clean clothes on he just kind of walked/stumbled alongside of us. Well, when we got to the stairwell, I guess I had unconciously decided to let go of him since he could walk alongside of us by himself. One of the advisors who was up there watching nicely mentioned "Where's your victim at?" as we were about to start going down. DOH! So we went back got him and made it down fine.
    The lesson here being, just as with your search partner, you should always have contact with the victim, even though they usually won't be able to walk out.

    Recently, we were practicing a combat challenge kind of thing, just for fun and practice hooking things up etc. We had all done a timed singles run and now we were doing it with partners. Well, after I had hooked up the gated wye and the hose to it, I started to get a little ahead of myself and started getting the hydrant wrench ready to turn, well, thanks to an advisor again, he said to check my partner, luckily I looked over and he was just about to connect the sections of hose. Fortunately for me (and him) I didn't turn on the hydrant when I was about to.
    Lesson here, always KNOW EXACTLY what your partner is doing, don't assume anything just because you thought you saw him or her doing something a second before. It's always better to wait an extra second instead of maybe injuring yourself or someone else.

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    I got another story. Happened to my advisor on a call.

    Hydrants have three connections right?
    2 1 3/4 side connections and a 5 inch connection facin the street.

    Well my advisor hooked up the 5 inch supply line to the engine and saw the 1 3/4 cap slowly unraveling. So he took the wrench and stepped in front to tighten it. Well he stepped in front at the wrong moment because..............

    POP!!!! BANG!! CRACK!!!

    The cap came flying off and since it had no chain went flying directly into his pelvic area at full force. He hit the ground like a brick building and was rushed to the ER with a Trauma team waiting for him. He could not speak for that whole day and was crying in pain. He had the literal meaning of "Elephant Balls" for 4 days.

    Lesson Learned- NEVER Step In Front Of The Caps Of A Running Hydrant!!! Tighten It From The Side!!!!
    Mike
    Levittown, NY
    Cadet Corps Member
    1st Lieutenant

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    My dad was once working a house fire on new years eve and was sent up to ventilate the roof. There was about 3-4 feet of snow on the ground and it was cold. They got on the roof and started to cut holes,and my dad was the officer and one of the guys called him over, but another guy on the roof didnt see my dad behind him and in trying to dodge the axe, my dad fell two stories to the snow below. He luckily walked away. If it wasnt for that snow he would have been seriously hurt.
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    One time durring an explorer training I stupidly put the water on too early and dumped the thermal column, couldnt see worth crap. Also did a entry into a second floor window, had my haligan with me but forgot to sound the floor, I managed to fit through the window, and heard the instructor "yelling you are now a piece of toast" some fun times.
    FF I
    FF II
    Hazmat Operations
    EMT-B
    ---------------------------------------------------

    The light at the end of the tunnel has been temporarly shut off due to the current work load. The Mangement

    When all else fails USE DUCT-TAPE!!!

    My views posted in this fourm are my personal views only and do not reflect on any agencies that I am afiliated with.

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    One evening we were out doing hose evolutions and practicing hitting hydrants with our mutual aid dept. one of there older jr's and i were helping and the younger guys were responsible for everything they had to pull the line, wrap the hydrant, signal the driver to pull away and lay 100' of LDH, connect it to the truck and then pull a crosslay and go through the types of streams they had learned. At one point they decided they were going to be funny and turn there hose on the two of us, we had been pretty hard on them throught the day but they knew it was in fun so we then waited for them to pull the hose again and be spraying and we turned the deck gun on them (just a side note deluge makes one heck of a water gun) then came at use again with the attack line but openned it to find they were out of water, the other jr and closed there line on the pump panel and proceed to charge his own short section and was ready for them when they came around the side to see what the problem was. So in the end we went home dry, they went home a little smarter and alot wetter.

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    Pump class has been taking the cake for humerous training incidents as of late. A bit of background:

    Our department has been doing a pump class for 3 hours every Thursday night instead of regular drill nights to try to provide all firefighters with at least a working knowledge of the pumps and their operations(including the junior brigade, ie. ME). So, we have a good friend of the department who's been fighting fires for 40 years and teaching for 30 of those in to help.

    Well, at pump class, we enjoy poking fun at him. For example, one time he ordered to pull in in our engine, hit the hydrant, and drop two 1.75inch lines and flow water to simulate coming on scene of a house fire and initiating an attack. Our senior guy on the crew took the nozzle and, as we came in, planned that we were only go to pack one hose for our evolution. SO I grabbed a portable and we stopped and I hopped out, reporting us on scene of a working fire and advising that we were initiating an interior operation. I went to the area we'd flow water and they stretched in one line. We started flowing water while the rest of our crew took their merry old time even preparing to lay the other line off the truck. I then quickly reported that the fire was under control and that we were returning to the truck. Suffice to say, the instructor slightly...flustered.

    We've also taken the time to include some of the infamous size ups(from some of the infamous fires in the region, and others from regular fires, all of which seem to really push his buttons) such as "Looks like a worker!" at what was the biggest fire in PA history for a couple of years. So, every time we pull in on a simulated fire, what's the first thing we report?

    Looks like a worker to me!

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    Can't say I've had very many humerous training incidents, although, they were funny to the others who seen them happen to me.

    I was training on our Tanker, had the deck gun up w/ a smoothbore tip. Not really paying attention to where the very end of the stream was going. I'd say we had a good 400 yard stream at full throttle. Turn the stream into the parking lot of an auto body shop across the lake, pond water went right in the sun roof of a tractor & trailer. oops.

    Not training, but close. Filling a swimming pool when I was a junior about 7 years ago, had a 2 1/2" line laid out, two of us holding it. Pump operator thought funny to turn the pressure up, he did. We had it for a while, began with holding it with our hands. Operator walked away, hose went straight up in the air, to avoid being hit with the coupling, I wrapped my arms around it. Literally picked us up off the ground before the hose ripped out of our arms, flopped under the deck and got stuck spraying me w/ enough pressure to rip the ground apart around me before they shut it off... Soaked, covered with mud... But I still say it didn't get the best of me, b/c only one person saw it and I can object one persons word!

    On actual pump training, junior pulled a 6" suction hose off the hose bed; fell in goose poop, splattered all over another fireman. Pulled the other one off, swung it to avoid the crap, smacked me on the back of the leg causing a 2" laceration. He laughed, I didn't.. So I didn't feel too bad when he "slipped" on a rock and fell partially into the pond, and partially into the goose crap.

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    Well im not the biggest Jr on our Department at 5'6 145lbs
    so one night at training i decided i was gonna practice with the 1.75 In Hose so i threw my PPE on and an SCBA and all the guys there joked that the gear weighed more than me but i didnt let that deter me cuz i love a Challenge they bet i couldnt last for 10 Min dragging a Charged Hoseline and spraying it at the same time little to there bets i lasted for an hour and a half stopping only to change air cylinder i went till i collapsed all the guys at the station have a lot of respect for me now

    so dont let your Size hinder you
    dont let anyone tell you your to small
    Rest In Peace
    Anndee Huber-A tragedy which could have been prevented!
    Ban Alcohol in the Firehouse!

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    Probably the worst training I ever experienced.. We had to gear up SCBA and all, do 20 jumping jacks, 20 pushups, then lift an old 30lb appliance above your head and run about 500ft there and back, then go through the 'maze' which was nothing more than a bunch of 3x3 confined space tunnels, which right after that we had to crawl into the burn building and do a hose maze with about 500ft of hose. All with a mask and no air, so all you got was that nasty hot air.

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    I was in the middle of the maze once, no smoke, just a blacked out mask, I WAS TOLD I HAD A FULL AIR TANK, about 3/4ths the way through I felt my mask vibrate and the bells goin off. I was very angry. Took off the regulator and finished. SOMEONE PLACED A 1/2 FULL TANK IN MY FRAME. Well atleast it was training.
    FF I
    FF II
    Hazmat Operations
    EMT-B
    ---------------------------------------------------

    The light at the end of the tunnel has been temporarly shut off due to the current work load. The Mangement

    When all else fails USE DUCT-TAPE!!!

    My views posted in this fourm are my personal views only and do not reflect on any agencies that I am afiliated with.

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    Default teehee

    We were just doing donning and doffing and i was kinda in a hurry and i forgot my mask and regulator in the trailer where we keep our SCBA's and our good gear(yes we have good gear and dirty gear kinda spoiled!) and so after everyone had already started donning i was like CRAP i forgot my mask and regulator. This was RIGHT after i had started explorers!! Also it was pouring down rain thats the only reason we were doing donning and doffing!!! oops...
    Kat

    Champaign Explorer Post 207

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    I forgot to turn off my pass once I turned off my tank, we are doing a post drill de-breifing and the pass starts going off, in the training tower, and it took me 5min(felt like forever) to find it and shut it off.

    The only think I hate about training is when we get a nozzle without a pistol grip on it, it takes a lot to hold that thing down(3" attack line)
    FF I
    FF II
    Hazmat Operations
    EMT-B
    ---------------------------------------------------

    The light at the end of the tunnel has been temporarly shut off due to the current work load. The Mangement

    When all else fails USE DUCT-TAPE!!!

    My views posted in this fourm are my personal views only and do not reflect on any agencies that I am afiliated with.

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    This past weekend, my post and two or three others had the opportunity to work with the Highland Twp. FD on School Bus Extrication. We(the firefighters mainly) used k-12's, hydraulic cutters and spreaders, hand tools and various other tools to tear apart this bus. We learned many valuable lessons should an incident like this occur. We cut holes in the bus the length of four seat rows. It was really fun and the rest of the weekend we had a waterball tournament and other competitions.
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    These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
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