Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber ftfdverbenec770's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Right between city and country
    Posts
    347

    Default fire photography

    this is for anyone with photography skills.

    i was thinking about becomming the dept photographer, and i was wondering what settings are best for capturing the moment. now i know that each picture is going to be different, but what is going to be my best aptures and shutter speeds? should i use a higher speed film?
    thanks.


  2. #2
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    6,520

    Default 2 cents...

    Here ya go. There is a guy out of Southern California named
    Troy Case and he has to be one of the best fire photographers
    in the USA. You can call him direct and check out his work
    at- http://www.troycase.com/php-cgi/gallery/index.php

  3. #3
    Forum Member FWDbuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Pee-Ayy!
    Posts
    7,354

    Default Fire Photography is NOT something you are just going to pick up overnight....

    First of all, your equipment can make you or break you. Having good quality, tip-top shape cameras and accessories will assist you in taking those split-second shots so common on the fireground. I use Nikon, for first and foremost, their glass. Nikon lenses are unbeaten in quality and durability, especially when you consider all the hostile environments you encounter on the fireground. I have two bodies, an N-6000 and an N2, both motordriven. My primary lenses are a standard 40-90mm adjustable, and a 7-210 Telephoto. I find that this lens works best for 90% of all fireground shots.

    Every fire photographer I know does his or her own thing, and works differently than the other guy. I personally set my camera on full manual mode- especially for night time fires- The lighting dynamics change SO much at night fires, an automatic focusing/aparture selecting camera would blow it's microchips trying to keep up. Auto focus cameras want to focus on the brightest object 90% of the time- You may be trying to take a picture of the flames in the window, but it will focus on the quartz lights on the pumper.....Try to get a camera with a built-in light meter, one you can see through the view finder.

    For film, I use Kodak 800 or 1000 for night shots. Along with the night film, I also use a Nikon 800 Flash unit, powered by an auxilary "hip pack" battery pack. This allows more power to be delivered to the flash faster, allowing for an instant recovery time for the strobe power unit. Day shots I use 100 or 200. For apparatus shots, I use Kodachrome 64 Slide Film.
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

  4. #4
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    57

    Default

    If you go to www.thewatchdesk.com/forum, you will find under their General Fire Department Discussion forums a section for fire photography. There is a quite extensive thread on photo info which should interest you. You may also want to contribute to that thread.

  5. #5
    Forum Member Fire304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    At the Helm
    Posts
    1,174

    Default

    In a previous thread we discused digital photography on the fire ground, lots of relavent stuff there.

    http://cms.firehouse.com/forums2/sho...ht=photography

    I have to say, digital is the way to go. You can instantly review your results and adjust the camera to get the perfect shots without burning a week's salary worth of film.

    Personally I'm shooting for a Canon EOS-1D
    ______________________________ __________________
    If you are new to posting please CLICK HERE for an essential lesson
    ______________________________ __________________
    A bad day in the boat is better than a good day in the office. And in my case the office is a boat!

    IACOJ Fire Boat 1

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Jefferson, Oregon
    Posts
    178

    Default

    I've basically tossed my film SLR, and am using an Olympus C-750 ZLR 4.0 MP w/ a 10x optical zoom. This gives me the full range of manual options, with a dang good zoom lens. It has a hot shoe, and the lens has a fairly low f-stop. When I can afford it, I'll go get the new Pentax IST-D dig SLR. In the meantime though, this $500 ZLR works well on the fire scene. I'm pretty rough on my equipment, so this compact lil' camera is kinda' nice!

    I generally use an ambient light setting, and hold the exp. settings. Flash is usually for fill only. Oh, and when I used film, it was Fuji 200 Superia.....all the time.

    Now if only I could figure out how to shoot pics while I'm on the nob.....

    Edit: BTW, one of the great things about dig is you have a much greater exposure latitude w/ dark shots. You can bring out alot of detail in the dig darkroom that you cant' w/ traditional film.
    Last edited by mcleoud151; 07-07-2004 at 01:38 PM.
    "The more we sweat in training, the less we bleed in battle."

  7. #7
    Forum Member Fire304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    At the Helm
    Posts
    1,174

    Default

    Originally posted by mcleoud151
    Now if only I could figure out how to shoot pics while I'm on the nob.....
    Duct tape, zip-lock bag, and IR remote!
    ______________________________ __________________
    If you are new to posting please CLICK HERE for an essential lesson
    ______________________________ __________________
    A bad day in the boat is better than a good day in the office. And in my case the office is a boat!

    IACOJ Fire Boat 1

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Jefferson, Oregon
    Posts
    178

    Default

    I knew that remote came w/ the cam for a reason!!!!! ROFL!!
    "The more we sweat in training, the less we bleed in battle."

  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    4

    Default troy

    small world,
    troy is my skydiving buddy.

    tobey

    p.s. he is really good, i was taking forensics photography and he was very helpful. check him out.

  10. #10
    Forum Member DualReverse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    149

    Default

    You might also try joining a professional organization, like the International Fire Photographers Association (www.ifpaonline.com) or the International Organization of Fire Photographers (www.firephoto.org)...But I'll definitely agree with the others in saying that it takes lots of practice, and you have to find what works for you...
    Remember KQJ943

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts