1. #26
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    Default Re: And again...

    Originally posted by CALFFBOU
    The Dept. of Homeland Security has adapted a standard for
    the nation.
    Who Cares? When the D.H.S. becomes the FAST Team, or searches the floor above the fire, or vents the roof, or pushes the line in with me, I'll pay attention. Until then, I couldn't give a rat's *** what they have to say. Just another bunch of beaurocraps.

    Seriously, Bro, don't you think your Anti-Everything-East-Coast act is getting a little old?

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    Post From FireEngineering.com

    MAYDAY AND URGENT MESSAGES

    BY JOHN MILES AND JOHN TOBIN

    Because of the normal volume of traffic on fire department radios during firefighting operations, a department must have a procedure that gives priority to an individual who needs to notify the incident commander (IC) of a life-threatening situation that has happened or is about to happen. In the fire service, we classify these emergency transmissions as "Mayday" or "Urgent" transmissions. Below are some situations where you would use this type of emergency radio message.

    MAYDAY VS. URGENT
    A Mayday transmission is needed if


    *imminent collapse is feared,
    *structural collapse has occurred,
    *a member is unconscious or has suffered a life-threatening injury,
    *an officer discovers that a member under his supervision is missing (if the missing member is an officer, any team member can transmit the message), or
    *a member is trapped or lost.


    An Urgent message is transmitted if


    *a member suffers an injury that requires medical attention but is not life-threatening,
    *the firefighting strategy will switch from interior to exterior attack,
    *a structural condition is discovered that could endanger working firefighters,
    *fire is entering an exposure,
    *a loss of water occurs that will endanger members, or
    Command needs to gain control of the radio channel.


    A Mayday transmission is used only in situations that are life threatening to firefighters. The Urgent message is used for other types of fireground emergencies.

    TRANSMISSION PROCEDURES

    To send a Mayday or an Urgent message, key the mike on your radio and transmit:

    "Mayday, Mayday! [Firefighter's ID and position] with a Mayday!" or "Urgent, Urgent! [Firefighter's ID and position] with an Urgent!"

    This format must be the same for Mayday and Urgent transmissions. The transmissions differ only in the specific type of Mayday or Urgent message transmitted.

    Listen for a response. If none is heard, repeat the message until you are acknowledged.

    Note: If the IC does not respond to the Mayday or Urgent transmission, anyone who hears the message is responsible to relay it to an officer or to the IC directly. Preferably, the message should be delivered face to face, if possible, to keep the radio channel open. If this is not possible, then the person responding to the Mayday transmission should transmit an "Urgent" message to gain control of the radio channel. Do not use "Mayday" to avoid confusion when answering the second transmission.

    IC's RESPONSIBILITY
    On receipt of a Mayday or an Urgent transmission, all radio traffic should stop. The IC should answer the emergency transmission as follows, preferably using a car radio:

    "All units at the scene, stand by for a Mayday/Urgent transmission. Unit with the Mayday/Urgent, go ahead with your message."

    When your Mayday or Urgent has been acknowledged, you must be prepared to transmit the following required vital information to the IC:


    *designated name of the member transmitting the message,
    *member's unit,
    *member's fireground assignment,
    *member's location, and
    *reason for the Mayday or Urgent transmission.


    If the transmission is for a missing or trapped member, provide the member's name, unit, assignment, last known location, and whether the missing member is radio equipped.

    Note: A radio-equipped member can also activate the "Emergency" alarm button on his handheld radio, if available.

    SAMPLE TRANSMISSION
    "Mayday, Mayday! Ladder 1 officer with a Mayday."

    After transmission is received and acknowledged: "Ladder 1 officer is on the floor above the fire, and I have a member missing. The missing member is Firefighter Smith. He was last seen searching apartments on the fourth floor above the fire. He does not have a radio."

    The IC should acknowledge receipt of the message and repeat it back for confirmation.

    When a Mayday is transmitted, it is paramount that the IC take decisive action to control the rescue while continuing to maintain the balance of the fireground operations. He must assign the FAST (RIT) units or rescue units and fill in with additional companies for those units redirected to help with the rescue operations. As is the case with any significant fireground operations, it is important to assign a chief officer to the operation.

    If your department does not have a Mayday or Urgent procedure, use these suggestions to get started. Keep the types of Mayday transmissions to about five. Any more will diminish the importance of the message. Standardize your Mayday and Urgent procedures with the other departments on your radio frequency. If each department has its own procedure, it will lead to confusion during an emergency.

    Set up a committee within your mutual- aid district to address and formulate emergency radio procedures. Keep them simple, and then train your members in their use.

    JOHN MILES is a lieutenant with the Fire Department of New York, assigned to Ladder 35. Previously, he served with Ladder 34 and Engine 82 and as a volunteer firefighter with the River Vale (NJ) Fire Department and the Spring Valley (NY) Fire Department.

    JOHN TOBIN, a 30-year fire service veteran, is assistant chief and training officer with the River Vale (NJ) Fire Department, where he previously served as chief. He has a master's degree in public administration and is a member of the Bergen County (NJ) Fire Academy Advisory Board.

    Fire Engineering April, 2004
    Author(s) : John Miles John Tobin
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    Default Re: Re: Re: O, last post...

    Originally posted by CALFFBOU
    After 9/11- Were all of us supposted to change everything
    to match the terms used that day?
    Explain to me...why YOU think it can only be used in the air and on the sea? What proof can you provide that, as an international distress signal...it should not be used by firefighters?


    Good grief, what do you suggest? Next time I get in BIG trouble...I'm gonna look for a United States flag...make my way to the window....decide which way is up...and fly the flag as recommended below:

    THE FLAG CODE
    Title 36, U.S.C., Chapter 10
    As amended by P.L. 344, 94th Congress
    Approved July 7, 1976

    § 176. Respect for flag: No disrespect should be shown to the flag of the United States of America; the flag should not be dipped to any person or thing. Regimental colors, State flags, and organization or institutional flags are to be dipped as a mark of honor.
    (a) The flag should never be displayed with the union down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property.

    There is nothing that says MAYDAY...can NOT be used for other distress purposes...is there?
    ************************************************** **************

    BURTON A. CLARK, Ed.D., EFO, MIFireE
    Firehouse.Com Contributor


    These must be the most frighting three words that can be heard over the fire ground radio. Everyone who hears the call knows that what was a public emergency, which we the fire department came to solve, has now become an emergency for us. Something has gone wrong and one of our own needs help.

    Every fire department in the country has detailed SOPs explaining who on the fire ground will do what, when a firefighter calls MAYDAY. The RIT is activated, radio channels are changed, additional chiefs and units are dispatched. We have all trained extensively on these procedures. We have developed special techniques on how to get downed firefighters out of tight spaces or up through holes. And we carry an RIT bag on the apparatus.

    All this is important, but it is the easy part of the process. We have almost completely ignored the most important first step, getting the firefighter to recognize they are in trouble and need to get help, to call MAYDAY.

    What mayday decision parameters have we given firefighters? How do we teach the cognitive and affective mayday decision-making process? How do we teach the psychomotor skill to execute the decision?

    We have not answered these questions satisfactorily. Our standards and training are woefully lacking for this critical firefighter personal life saving competency.

    The NFPA 1001 Standards for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications (1997) does not definitively address the concept of mayday. The word mayday is not used in the standard. There is a mayday inference in the Firefighter I Standard 3-2.3 that reads, "transmit and receive via fire department radio". The firefighter is to know "Departmental radio procedures and etiquette for routine traffic, emergency traffic". The skill is " the ability to operate radio equipment and distinguish between routine and emergency traffic" (p.1001-1).

    Mayday is again alluded to in Standard 3-3.4. It reads, "Exit a hazardous area as a team"; knowledge "…elements that create or indicate a hazard"; skill "… evaluate area for hazard" (p. 1001-7).

    There is more verbiage on auto extraction then mayday in the standard. In Firefighter II the only standard that comes close to mayday is 4-2.3. It reads, “communicate the need for team assistance”; knowledge “…fire department radio communications procedures”; skill “ the ability to operate fire department communications equipment.” This standard seems to be about routine assistance not mayday conditions.

    The Firefighter’s Handbook (2000), chapter 23, has a section titled “Firefighter’s Emergencies”. The opening paragraph reads in part, “To help understand the actions to be taken during an actual or potential firefighter emergency, the firefighter must study procedures for rapid escape and declaring a mayday for lost or trapped situations” (p. 690). Under entrapments it reads, “The first step a firefighter should take in an entrapment is to get assistance. Activation of a PASS device is warranted and the declaration of a “mayday” should be made over the radio” (p. 692). Under the heading of “Lost firefighter” it reads, “We cannot overemphasize that a fighter or team lost in an IDLH atmosphere is in fact experiencing a firefighter emergency” (p. 692). "First, the firefighter or team must report the fact they are lost. This is also a mayday situation and should be transmitted as such over the radio” (p. 693).

    Essentials of Fire Fighting (1998) does not refer to the word mayday. In the “Rescue and Extrication” chapter there is a section titled “Trapped or Disoriented Firefighters”. In regard to disoriented firefighters it states, “If they are not having any success finding their way out, they should find a place of relative safety and activate their PASS devices” (p. 181).

    For trapped firefighters it states, “These firefighters should immediately activate their PASS devices. If either trapped or disoriented firefighters have radios, they should try to make radio contact as quickly as possible with other personnel on the emergency scene” (p. 182). Our mayday standards and training doctrine clearly indicates that we have not researched the concept of a firefighter-calling mayday scientifically.

    Maybe it's time for a National distress standard? (I vote for Mayday)
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    Default Mayday Works for me

    The proper sea faring term for latrine is a “head”. I always thought the International Distress term was “SOS” or Dit-Dit-Dit, Da-Da-Da, Dit-Dit-Dit In Morse Code. This goes all the way back to the days of sailing vessels. Mayday! Followed by location and what’s wrong makes a whole bunch more sense then "Everyone, Hum Everyone" "Please clear the Airwaves so our injured can ask us properly for Help"!........Or my favorite 10-2, 10-4 We have One Brown Cow, With only 3 on the floor.
    “Just when you think something is made to be Idiot Proof. They go a head and make a better Idiot”

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    Default

    NJFFSA16, you beat me to the punch.
    For me it was the mid 80's that I was taught how to use MAYDAY. Ever since, that is what has been used by the departments by me. It was FDNY guys who taught it to us.
    I don't know who coined it first but it has been around a long time before 9/11 and I think it is a good term that conveys the correct intent.

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    Default

    If it meant life or death, I would go with the gloves off if I had to, but I would def. try to calm myself down, if not already, and try to comm. out my distress signal with my gloves on.

    The answer, different radio configs., thinner but equally protective gloves, whatever, would work for me, I would like to see how the glove end of things spans out. Anyways…

    On to the hijacked subject thread, I do not think it is about standards, I think one should be made however. I think it is about what people recognize, I know that all of my depts. FF's and all in the county clearly recognize MAYDAY as their depts. standard. I know, it is not about a whole bunch of people in my area who endorse it. But I think a good majority of the Fire Service recognizes MAYDAY as the unset standard. And if calling a MAYDAY is going to be recognized by everyone and not second guessed and save a FF's life, then by all means let’s call a MAYDAY. Plus, that was being taught and used way before 9/11.

    Besides, we are missing the big picture, forget standards and all that bs, it is what gets the FAST, RIT, FART team into action and saving our own that matters, regardless of choice of words.

    Edited to add a portion about gloves to my first paragraph.
    Last edited by FiftyOnePride; 07-06-2004 at 08:16 AM.
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    Default Re: Me...

    Originally posted by CALFFBOU
    1. I would tell the instructor to "Bite me." I would
    take my glove off to get the radio transmission out.
    And in most academies, you would spend the next week discovering what hell truly is.

    I agree that there are times when it is entirely appropriate to remove your gloves to carry out a task. A training exercise is not one of these. Training scenarios provide the opportunity to practice these tasks with gloves on so that you can become proficient. That is why we have firefighters practice tying knots blindfolded and with gloves on. The untrained firefighter will find it easier to perform such tasks without gloves. I can honestly say that those who have completed our classes find it quicker and easier to do them without taking their gloves off. There are always exceptions, but if you don't practice, you'll never become proficient.

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    Default

    Posted by by buddy "Bou"

    The Dept. of Homeland Security has adapted a standard for
    the nation. It clearly says "mayday" is reserved for air
    and sea terms.
    This is the same organization that can't seem to remove it's cranium from it's rectum.

    Posted by Using All Hands
    Who Cares? When the D.H.S. becomes the FAST Team, or searches the floor above the fire, or vents the roof, or pushes the line in with me, I'll pay attention. Until then, I couldn't give a rat's *** what they have to say. Just another bunch of beaurocraps.
    Amen... they have never been in a fire, and are probably getting their information from the "if you throw a book at it, the fire will go out" crowd.

    Emergency traffic? That is the rigs leaving the "casa del fuego"

    Urgent? That's when my morning coffee kicks in and I have to use the bathroom/head/latrine/outhouse/port-a potty!
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
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    Default Re: Re: And again...

    Originally posted by UsingAllHands


    Who Cares? When the D.H.S. becomes the FAST Team, or searches the floor above the fire, or vents the roof, or pushes the line in with me, I'll pay attention. Until then, I couldn't give a rat's *** what they have to say. Just another bunch of beaurocraps.

    Seriously, Bro, don't you think your Anti-Everything-East-Coast act is getting a little old?
    #1. It is a standard in my FD and state and no one else here
    has been able to supply one yet other than articles.

    #2. I am not "anti-everything-east-coast" as you stated. In
    my 15 years in the fire service, I just refuse to be so
    "old skool". Plus I am care ful which bandwagon I jump on
    or which FD to worship.

    Not lets all be cool. If you want to fight, there is a good
    "paid vs. volly" thread currently going on. Trt that one...Bou

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    Let me get this straight. If I'm down, and get on the radio and say "MAYDAY,MAYDAY,MAYDAY, FIREFIGHTER DOWN"; nobody (at least not BOU) is coming after me because I'm not using the proper terminology according to some piece of paper.

    I'm glad that nobody around here gets so tied up in what some paper says, but is concerned with what works.

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    Default So...

    Originally posted by Eng34FF
    Let me get this straight. If I'm down, and get on the radio and say "MAYDAY,MAYDAY,MAYDAY, FIREFIGHTER DOWN"; nobody (at least not BOU) is coming after me because I'm not using the proper terminology according to some piece of paper.

    I'm glad that nobody around here gets so tied up in what some paper says, but is concerned with what works.
    #1. I probably would come help you. (just kidding)

    #2. It is not just because of some paper. It is crossing
    terms with other specific, distinct areas. (sea and air)
    It is called "clear text". Again, mayday can sound like
    many other words that can be used.

    "EMERGENCY TRAFFIC" is very clear and to the point.

    Let it go.

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    #2. It is not just because of some paper. It is crossing
    terms with other specific, distinct areas. (sea and air)
    It is called "clear text". Again, mayday can sound like
    many other words that can be used.

    "EMERGENCY TRAFFIC" is very clear and to the point.

    Let it go.
    Bou

    Just one comment, and then I will let it go. I live in an area surrounded by water where the major employer is a Naval Air Station. Many firefighters are also pilots, aircrew, boaters or watermen. MAYDAY is considered clear text around here. If I'm down, MAYDAY is what comes to my mind first, not "EMERGENCY TRAFFIC". If it works, I'll use it.

    I think this is a little like expecting everybody to call a tanker a tender or vice-versa

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    Damn! Again I find I'm doing things wrong. Didn't know that 9/11 was the basis for my SOP's/SOG's (which were written years before then). My department SOP uses both Emergency Traffic and Mayday. Emergency Traffic is used for non-FF down messages, like "the roof is collapsing". Something we want everyone to hear immediately. Mayday is used for FF down. Oh well, guess we're wrong again. Haven't yet had my Coast Guard station or the somewhat nearby Naval Base (which has no boats or water?) complain.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Here were being tought to use MAYDAY MAYDAY MAYDAY.

    I could really care less what we say actually, all that matters is that there is a Firefighter down and we need to save him.
    Ryan

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    You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You must do the thing which you think you cannot do. -Eleanor Roosevelt

    Lets not forget those lost on 9-11-01

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    Default ???

    Originally posted by Bones42
    Damn! Again I find I'm doing things wrong. Didn't know that 9/11 was the basis for my SOP's/SOG's (which were written years before then).
    No one, that is no one said you were doing things wrong.
    I certainly didnt. All I ever said where is the standard?

    My state has this standard, I am guessing mainly because
    we work closely with aircraft and sea vessels contantly.

    My thing is after 9/11, a lot of people had to run out
    and get a leather helmet, cool. Or changed their turnout
    orders to black to look like the big city. Thats all fine.
    After all of that, I now have to follow suit and use non-fire desinated term? Not now.

    LASTLY- This is forum for people to discuss their opinions.
    Respect what I say as well as I do you. I never said "You
    have to do it this way!" Just because you dont like or
    agree with what I write, act the professional and leave the
    chip off of your shoulder and insults at home.

    I wam just following a standard. No one else
    has yet to produce one. Until you do, let it go.
    Last edited by CALFFBOU; 07-06-2004 at 05:04 PM.

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    Default Re: Re: Me...

    Originally posted by HM604OH


    And in most academies, you would spend the next week discovering what hell truly is.
    Been there, done that. I now teach at an academy
    vs. attending. I just wouldnt have been so quick
    to yell at a student, "Your hand is burned!" I cant
    stand an Instructor who had to boost his ego this
    way.

    If he/she cant hit the button with a gloved hand, yeah,
    quickly take the glove off, activate and put it back
    on.
    Last edited by CALFFBOU; 07-06-2004 at 05:05 PM.

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    You'll notice many of our line officers keep one hand, sometimes both, ungloved. The bare hand can monitor overhead conditions and give early warning to members on the fire floor.

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    "Emergency Traffic, Firefighter Down" is very, very clear

    No, it's not. It's only clear within the definitions we accept for the words.

    "Procede with traffic" is a commonly used fire-service term for shutting off your lights & sirens and proceding to the scene with the normal flow of traffic. Does Emergency Traffic in this situation mean go lights & sirens because you have a firefighter down?

    If we're truly worried about crossing terms, why isn't it a problem for airplanes AND boats to use the term? After all, if only boats could use "mayday" you wouldn't be worried about searching the land for a possible plane down, would you?

    Prohibiting it's use for firefighting operations on the thought it might trigger a Coast Guard operation is sillyness, and if it's in the standard it needs to be removed.

    I concur with Bone's use of the two terms, and it is a well accepted *standard* in the U.S. -- written into many departmental SOPs as well as frequent, recent use in national trade journals.

    However, at the risk of proposing something even more universally plain english I think a better term than "Emergency Traffic" is "Radio Silence" -- once issued no one talks except at the direction of the authority issuing the radio silence or someone has true emergency conditions to report. And with a formal procedure to end Radio Silence either with a clearing the silence or directing a change in frequency, i.e. "Command clear on Radio Silence, normal radio usage may resume" or "Command all units, FAST operations to stay on Channel 7, all other units shift to Channel 5"

    ====================
    BTW, getting back to the gloves:

    We're trained to feel a door before opening it...

    http://www.ci.houston.tx.us/hfd/fire...y/July00CE.htm
    http://www.firehouse.com/training/dr...4/engine1.html

    http://fe.pennnet.com/Articles/Artic...D=feel%20glove

    Are we feeling these doors gloved? It sure takes a while for heat to go through fire gloves...

    Just a thought...
    IACOJ Canine Officer
    20/50

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    Default Re: Re: Re: And again...

    Originally posted by CALFFBOU
    It is a standard in my FD and state and no one else here
    has been able to supply one yet other than articles.
    What standard would that be? You provided us with a link to an adobe page that says MAYDAY should not be used. I've never heard of this web site before, they don't sound like they are affiliated with NFPA nor are they using a CFR citation. Even if this site turns out to be California's version of NFPA I don't care, I'm not in California anymore (thank God) and have no intentions to return except to visit.

    You show me a national standard that says we should not use it, something like an NFPA, Code of Federal Regulation, or even an IFSTA standard. Show me a national standard for the use of MAYDAY at all. I spent considerable amount of time pouring through the CFRs last night looking for one, surprisingly there are very few refences to the word, mostly the references are either about false use of the word and the fines such use entails or the requirement that anyone who hears one must act. As far as I am concerned, unless it is specifically outlawed it is OK for use.
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    Default Re: ???

    Originally posted by CALFFBOU
    My thing is after 9/11, a lot of people had to run out
    and get a leather helmet, cool. Or changed their turnout
    orders to black to look like the big city. Thats all fine.
    After all of that, I now have to follow suit and use non-fire desinated term? Not now.
    *shakes head*

    Big deal. I fail to see how or why that would bother anyone. I certainly don't care what helmet people choose to wear, or what color their gear is. Imitation and flattery, ya know? And why does tradition have to be dragged into every discussion on here? I guess some people are hung up on it moreso than others. *shrug*

    Thanks to everyone for their input on the glove issue. I fully support the train-the-way-you-fight/fight-the-way-you-train mantra. But I still feel, if ya need to accomplish a potentially life-saving task and today's FF gloves are bogging you down, then you would remove a glove. That is how you would fight, so why not train that way? Why waste the time? And as e229lt has said, a bare hand can be useful regardless of what the book might say.

    The "distress" word issue has been quite interesting as well. It's been said already that it's probably more important to know when to call for help and to practice doing so, rather than worry about what code word/phrase is being used. I just think it makes sense to use a word that is never used except when one of our own is in serious trouble.

    Nothing more, nothing less Bou. No one has indicated why planes or ships would have a problem with FF's saying mayday. National search and rescue groups, the Coast Guard, etc... it's all been checked into already. So an appendix was adopted by DHS... BIG DEAL! It's a recommendation -- "SHOULD NOT" -- versus "WILL NOT." And when you think about when the term is being used, who the heck cares? If there are more compelling reasons for using a unique word that is internationally recognized as a distress signal, then why not do so? And it's a cop out to say "because of planes and ships" just as much as it is to say "I consider it a 24 hour period in May."
    Last edited by Resq14; 07-06-2004 at 06:23 PM.
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  22. #47
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    Default Re: Oh yeah?

    Originally posted by CALFFBOU
    I know you dont like change, or
    someone telling you what to do, or even California.
    Oh yeah, I forgot that I didn't like this dig either.

    I love change... WHEN IT MAKES SENSE. If there is a compelling reason to do things a different way, I'm all for it. Whether it's to make the job easier, safer, better, etc... change can be great.

    THAT SAID... change just for the sake of "changing" is not always a good thing, especially when the change itself does not make sense. This has nothing to do with being progressive, adopting change, etc. It has to do with a UNIQUE, universally-recognized distress call.

    Mayday is.

    Everything else I've heard here isn't.

    AND...

    Remember that you West-coasters will ALWAYS trail us East-Coasters...










    ...by exactly 3 hours. lol
    Last edited by Resq14; 07-06-2004 at 06:21 PM.
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  23. #48
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    Originally posted by CALFFBOU
    My thing is after 9/11, a lot of people had to run out
    and get a leather helmet, cool. Or changed their turnout
    My turn outs are still tan PBI, my helmet is a Ben Franklin 2 (classic tactical tupperware), and my preferred tool is the Denver, all of which are unchanged since before 9-11. There is nothing which has changed in my FD as a result of the actions of FDNY on 9-11.

    On my helmet band tucked in with my chocks is an FDNY pin. On each of our trucks there is a "Never forget 9-11-01" sticker with a silhouette of the towers on the side window. Both are in memory of our brothers who gave all that day.

    I do not know of a single FD in my area which has made an operational change as a result of the actions of FDNY (there are other changes as a result of the increase in perception of the terrorist situation, but not as an homage to FDNY). If you can site one department that has, please do, but don't cast dubious innuendoes about as fact. Maybe in California there was a headlong rush to come up to east coast standards, but out here things continue pretty unabated as it was before that horrible day.
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  24. #49
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    Exclamation Back on track... Gloves on!

    You know, in a real situation, I would cautiously remove my glove if need be, but in training I would stress the need to do it with gloves on.

    You play like you practice. If you can perform the task with gloves on in practice you'll be better off in a real situation. After all who knows what will happen when the glove comes off, secondary collapse (you just fell through the weak floor, right?), drop and loose the glove, cut yourself on an unseen hazard, or a sudden degration of conditions.

    There are lots of skills we practice which we rarely use, such as venting with an axe when power saws are available. The reason we do this is so when the crap hit the fan we are not doing it for the first time in the smoke and heat. In this situation, if the radio can be activated with gloves on then everyone should learn to do it that way.

    If it is simply impossible to do gloved then the firefighters should attempt to overcome the problem, perhaps by using a tool such as the corner of a flashlight or the tip of a chock. The officers should note this problem and attempt to fix the problem, such as by reprograming the radio or setting in motion an attempt to replace the radios with more user friendly models.

    My $0.02
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  25. #50
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    Default

    We use mayday for a firefighter trapped type situation. I am not worried about the control tower at Tweed sending out Air-Sea rescue, nor do I care. Everyone in our dept knows what it means. Everyone in every other department around us knows what it means. And I would bet that any random Joe Firefighter from any corner of the planet would get the idea as well.

    "Emergency Traffic" could mean anything. Mayday is pretty to the point, especially if thats all you can say.
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

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