1. #1
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    Default 2.5 " Backup line

    Just reading the story on the home page. they had a 2.5"
    line for backup. I would think the line would be charged on stand by at the door? Have you ever used 2.5" for interior attack? How many guys did it take to do the job? Do you advance it charged or not?

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    "Ansonia, Connecticut Firefighters Battle Working House Fire



    At 2212 hours on July 3, 2004 Ansonia, CT Fire Communications Transmitted Box #369 for a report of a multiple explosions at 01 Pin Oak Lane.

    Chief 22 arrived on scene reporting a working fire in a 1.5 story ranch house.

    Members of Engine 3 initiated a exterior attack backed up by a 2 1/2 inch line while members of Ladder 7 performed ventilation.

    Engine 5 and Squad 9 arrived and augmented Engine 3's lines.

    The fire was contained in about 45 minutes.

    The Ansonia Fire Marshals office along with the Connecticut State Fire Marshal's Office are investigating the cause of the fire and it has been labeled suspicious. "

    Article Provided by www.firehouse.com


    Talking about this story?
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    Dragging a charged duece and a half is like wrestling with a giant anaconda while Chief Marlin Perkins sits back in the Land Rover eating a bag of Doritos*.

    Bring the deuce point five to the building dry, charge the line when required and then wail the living snot out of the blaze. The more hands on the line, the easier it is to advance. Adrenaline is a wonderful thing..

    PS: of course, the nozzle of choice for the big line is a

    [size=large]
    Smoothbore!
    [/size]

    I'm so bad!


    *Mutual of Omaha's "Wild Kingdom"
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
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    I was always taught that you back up a line with a larger line. I also agree with gonzo. In today’s fire service it may not be possible to get the manpower Excuse me “peoplepower” To hand jack the duce 1/2 charged. I have heard a 50ft section of 2.5 hose can weigh 80lbs or more.
    “Just when you think something is made to be Idiot Proof. They go a head and make a better Idiot”

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    Weight of water per 50', *water only* -- add in your own hose's weight, too:

    1.5 38#
    1.75 52#
    2 68#
    2.5 106#
    3 153#
    3.5 208#
    4 272#
    5 425#
    6 612#

    Above determined by:
    1) 1 Gallon = 231 cu. inches.
    2) 1 Gallon = 8.34 pounds
    3) Volume of hose, in cubic inches, is determined by (pi*r(squared))*length

    So for 2.5"
    diameter = 2.5" so radius is 1.25"
    50' = 600"

    volume = (3.14 * (1.25 * 1.25)) * 600
    (3.14 * (1.56) ) * 600
    (4.9) * 600
    2940 cu. inches

    2940 cu. inches / 231 cu. inches/gallon = 12.72 gallons/50' length

    12.72 * 8.34 = 106 pounds of water.
    IACOJ Canine Officer
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    Default There you have it

    Our water must weigh less then yours. ļ
    “Just when you think something is made to be Idiot Proof. They go a head and make a better Idiot”

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    Talking HEYYYYYY GONZO...........................

    To properly operate the smoothbore, you must be wearing your Leather, Right?? (I couldn't pass that up ) We don't own any 2.5, so sometimes we use a 3" line, made up from scratch out of the supply bed. Nozzle of choice is our "Looney Gun", a 3"stainless Steel pipe 4ft long, 2.5 male FH threads on each end, 45*Elbow and a 2.5 quarter turn valve on the hose end, and a 750 gpm combo tip. Fires have gone out instantly when that line comes to the door.........
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
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    I didn't want to get into the nozzle debate
    Dal, you are the man with the numbers.

    I have always been a believer in big flows and I have read in many articles where 2.5 was used., but while doing some training with the 2.5 makes you wonder how much manuvering was done.

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    Howdy GPM123....

    I have used a 2 1/2" line in an interior attack...frankly it is a real bear.

    A couple of observations for you:

    1) If you have the standard 2 or 3 people to move this line advance it dry as far as possible then charge it to hit the fire.

    2) With that same 2 or 3 people I would say you will not advance while flowing water. Kill as much of the fire as you can and then shut down and advance and hit it again.

    3) When you bring the line in dry bring enough extra so that if you have to advance your slack is near where you are working instead of 100 feet or so away outside.

    4) I know you said you didn't want to debate nozzles but here goes anyways. Smoothbore of at least 1 1/8" (268gpm) should be the first choice and a low pressure combo nozzle of 250gpm at either 50 or 75 psi the second choice. The lower nozzle pressures of these nozzles make them easier to handle. Also, if you need a 2 1/2" line the smoothbore would be the best choice because you are hitting a large fire that needs massive water in a stream that will reach the heart of the fire.

    5) Practice, practice, and then practice some more. And, make it realistic. Have them advance it dry to a point charge the line and then advance...crawling of course since we rarely advance inside a building during fire attack standing up. This will open some eyes really quickly on how much work this is and what they need to do to make it work.

    We still use 2 1/2" hose at work and it is tough to move with our short staffed companies. I know I am a broken record with the 2" hose but my volly Fd loves the stuff. I personally think an FD with 2 1/2" hose could find their job much easier if they hooked 100' of 2 inch to the end of the 2 1/2" bed for the actual working line to be used by the attack crew. You would still get the same flow with a miniscule bump in EP but with a lighter more manueverable attack line.

    FyredUp

  10. #10
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    Default

    Three words:

    Equal or larger

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    Talking

    21/2 inch used to to be the only hose we carried (other than the booster reel) so we used it all the time for large fires. The easiest way to advance was to hit the target, shut down the nozzle, move to the new position and open up again. Never had any problems this way, and we usually had two or three guys on the line.

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