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  1. #1
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post US Wildfire Summary

    July 13th

    CALIFORNIA

    -- A total of 8,400 acres of brush and forest land have been
    burned so far.
    -- Dozens of homes have been evacuated.
    -- No homes have been destroyed.
    -- Remains out of control as of Tuesday morning.
    -- The cause is under investigation.

    San Bernardino National Forest
    -- Five-thousand acres burned so far, west of Palm Springs.
    -- Two campgrounds were evacuated.
    -- About a thousand firefighters are working on the fire, backed
    by helicopters and planes.
    -- Three firefighters suffered heat exhaustion Monday.
    -- Fire that began Sunday afternoon.
    -- Temperatures expected to top 100 degrees Tuesday.

    Northern Los Angeles County
    -- Some 3,400 acres have been burned so far.
    -- Blaze burning in the Lake Hughes area of the Angeles National
    Forest.
    -- Fire is 20 percent contained, as of early Tuesday.
    -- Prompted the mandatory evacuation of ten homes in the Happy
    Valley community.
    -- More than 500 county firefighters and hundreds of others from
    other agencies are on the line.
    -- Fire started about 12:30 pm Monday and quickly spread in the
    heavy brush.
    -- Flames have moved into thick forest that hasn't burned in 75
    years.
    -- 90 Boy Scouts were evacuated from a camp in Griffith Park.

    Fresno
    -- Hundreds of firefighters are trying to extinguish two fires
    that threaten dozens of homes.
    -- The area has triple-digit heat and steep terrain.
    -- One fire is on private land in the foothills about 23 miles
    west of Coalinga. It has burned 750 acres, destroyed one home and
    one commercial building.
    -- About 543 firefighting personnel are assigned to the blaze.
    -- The fire began about 6:30 pm Sunday when a tree fell against
    a power line.
    -- One firefighter was hospitalized from exposure to poison oak
    and several others had to be treated for bee stings.
    -- The other fire is in eastern Fresno County near the community
    of Shaver Lake.
    -- That 175-acre fire forced authorities Monday afternoon to
    evacuate the community of Cressman. About 100 homes and businesses
    were evacuated.
    -- The fire broke out about noon Monday and the cause of the
    fire was under investigation.
    -- More than 250 firefighters have been assigned to the blaze.
    There are no reports of injuries.


    UTAH

    -- Eleven-hundred acres burning in Tooele County, 40 miles west
    of Salt Lake City.
    -- Blaze was contained Monday around 8 pm.
    -- Fire broke out Sunday around 5 pm local time.
    -- Some crews remain to mop up hot spots.
    -- Officials believe the fire was started by a bottle rocket,
    but they have no suspects.
    -- Estimated to have cost 150-thousand dollars to fight, so far.


    COLORADO

    Northern Colorado
    -- Ten acres burning in northern Colorado, about 15 miles
    northwest of Fort Collins.
    -- Officials investigating the cause.
    -- Has destroyed an old abandoned miner's cabin, but no one was
    hurt.
    -- Blaze sent smoke spiraling into the sky.
    -- Temperatures have climbed toward 100 degrees statewide.
    -- About 20 firefighters worked with help from two single-engine
    air tankers and helicopters.
    -- About 20 AmeriCorps volunteers are also expected to help.

    Western Colorado
    -- Firefighters battling a stubborn 300-acre wildfire near
    Delta.
    -- Crews have extended the fire lines to surround 70 percent of
    the fire.
    -- Crews could be pulled off the rocky mountainside if lightning
    strikes increase again.
    -- Firefighting costs have climbed to nearly 850-thousand
    dollars.
    -- Investigators have not yet determined the cause.
    -- Nearby houses are no longer threatened.

    San Juan National Forest
    -- 60-acre fire started Sunday about 12 miles west of Pagosa
    Springs.
    -- 75 percent contained.
    -- A Hotshot crew is on the scene, with reinforcements en route.
    -- No structures are threatened.
    -- A second fire that started June 21 continues to burn at high
    elevations.
    -- The second fire is slow-burning, now at 450 acres.
    -- Being monitored but not actively fought.
    -- No structures are threatened, and the fire is considered
    beneficial to the environment.

    Rio Blanco County
    -- A 1,500-acre blaze is being allowed to burn to clear the
    forest of dead branches, logs and brush.


    ALASKA

    -- A 17,000-acre fire is burning about a mile from the village
    of Bettles.
    -- A village of about 60 residents is threatened.
    -- The blaze almost tripled in size Monday.
    -- Warm, dry weather is fueling the flames.
    -- Officials say conditions are drying out, heating up and
    taking a turn for the worse following several days of rain.
    -- Fire officials say the cause is unknown.
    -- 71 fires are burning statewide.


    ARIZONA

    -- Fires have consumed 29,200 acres in a mountaintop area.
    -- Homeowners have been told to clear low-lying vegetation from
    the ground to help protect homes.
    -- Some homeowners have been allowed to tour their small cabin
    communities that were rescued from a pair of wildfires on Mount
    Graham.
    -- The fires came within a quarter-mile of Turkey Flat, a
    collection of 74 cabins, but firefighters successfully kept the
    flames at bay.
    -- Fire crews spared Turkey Flat, the 15 cabins in Columbine and
    the $200 million Mount Graham International Observatory.
    -- The fires are dubbed the Nuttall Complex fires.
    -- Fires started in late June and merged last weekend.
    -- Fires are 65 percent contained, as of Monday night.
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  2. #2
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  3. #3
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    LAKE HUGHES, Calif. (AP) - Despite withering summer heat,
    thousands of firefighters aided by planes slowly gained ground
    Wednesday against California wildfires that have burned more than
    18,500 acres of brush and forest and caused hundreds of people to
    evacuate homes.
    Wet weather headed into the region, bringing hope of relief but
    also raising fears of flash flooding and new lightning-caused
    fires.
    The Federal Emergency Management Agency authorized funds for
    some of the blazes, which were burning in Los Angeles County, to
    the east in Riverside County, to the south in San Diego County and
    in Yosemite National Park in the Sierra Nevada.
    One of the most difficult fires, 4,700 acres in Angeles National
    Forest on the edge of the Mojave Desert, was 46 percent contained.
    The fire in Pine Canyon prompted voluntary and mandatory
    evacuations of more than 500 homes Tuesday, and an outbuilding and
    motor home were destroyed.
    "The fire has been unpredictable, but now firefighters are
    trying to make a stand at Highway 138 - just north of the fire - to
    attempt to cut it off there," said Los Angeles County fire
    Inspector John Mancha.
    In Riverside County, a 3,698-acre blaze on the edge of San
    Bernardino National Forest was 50 percent contained as it burned
    toward unpopulated terrain. It previously posed a threat to the
    mountain communities of Idyllwild, Pine Cove and Garner Valley.
    Elsewhere in the county, a 350-acre fire southwest of Lake
    Elsinore was 90 percent contained and people who had evacuated from
    the Bundy Canyon area returned home.
    In eastern San Diego County, an 8,500-acre blaze sparked by
    illegal fireworks was expected to be fully surrounded by nightfall
    Wednesday.
    Two outbuildings were destroyed and four firefighters were
    treated for minor injuries, said California Department of Forestry
    Firefighter Tyler Ashton.
    The fire prompted evacuation of about 100 rural homes and a Boy
    Scout camp Tuesday, but structures or communities were no longer
    threatened, Ashton said.
    In the Sierra, hikers were evacuated and trails were closed in
    part of Yosemite National Park after a lightning-sparked wildfire
    grew to 1,300 acres Tuesday. The fire was one of nine fires burning
    in the park from lightning strikes two weeks ago, the National Park
    Service said.
    In Nevada, a television reporter and several firefighters were
    injured by a wildfire that blackened 300 acres and destroyed
    several homes in the hills just west of Carson City.
    Carson City Fire Chief Dan Shirley said the fire was burning
    with increasing unpredictability after sending up a huge plume of
    smoke over the community.
    "It's very scary looking," Forest Service spokeswoman Christie
    Kalkowski said.
    Investigators said the fire was human-caused.
    In Arizona, fire officials hoped to decide later this week when
    residents evacuated from two mountain communities can return to
    their homes.
    Firefighters fended off flames that threatened the 74-cabin
    community of Turkey Flat, the 15 cabins in Columbine and the $200
    million Mount Graham International Observatory.
    Fire officials remained concerned about the possibility of flash
    flooding and continued heavy firefighter traffic, he said.

    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

    APTV 07-14-04 2019EDT
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  4. #4
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    PHOENIX (AP) - Stung by several years of destructive wildfires,
    firefighters in western states are pouncing on even small blazes to
    prevent the devastation from repeating itself this year.
    Instead of waiting for drought-weakened forests to explode,
    forest officials are attacking blazes in their infancy and sending
    out additional crews, engines and air resources earlier than in
    years past.
    "It is a mind-set change," said Tom Beddow, deputy director of
    fire and aviation for U.S. Forest Service's southwestern region.
    "Extreme fire behavior is the norm now."
    New Mexico and Arizona, where fire danger has reached record
    levels, started getting additional resources in May. As the fire
    danger escalates, more resources are being sent, Beddow said.
    Other states also received extra money early in the season in
    anticipation of potentially catastrophic wildfires.
    California received money this year to protect the counties of
    San Diego, Riverside and San Bernardino, which are dealing with
    unprecedented beetle infestations, said Karen Terrill, a California
    Department of Forestry spokeswoman.
    Tens of millions of trees in drought-stricken forests across the
    West have been killed by beetles at a rate never seen before.
    Colorado, Wyoming and South Dakota have added resources,
    including single-engine air tankers and engines, that were sent
    because high temperatures and low humidity are escalating the
    wildfire danger.
    "We never know when the large fires are going to develop but we
    have been trying to be proactive," said Larry Helmerick, spokesman
    for the Forest Service's Rocky Mountain Area Coordination Center,
    which covers Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas and South Dakota.
    He said efforts are paying off. Colorado has avoided the large
    wildfires it experienced in 2000 and 2002.
    Firefighters aggressively attacked a small fire that erupted in
    rugged terrain in northern Colorado on July 12. It sent smoke
    spiraling into the sky near Fort Collins, but no homes were
    threatened by the blaze.
    "We got an initial attack on it really fast," Helmerick said.
    These added resources have helped fire officials keep many of
    the blazes under control. Compared to last year, the number of
    ignitions in Arizona and New Mexico are up, but fire officials are
    catching 98 percent of them before they explode, Beddow said.
    In Arizona, earlier in the month, a 90-acre fire forced the
    evacuation of about 85 homes east of Payson. Fire officials
    immediately put nine air tankers on the blaze. The evacuated
    residents were allowed home just hours after the evacuation.
    "It is just kind of like the luck of the timing and quick
    attacking," Beddow said.
    Fire officials were also able to get enough resources to fend
    off the flames that threatened about 100 cabins and a $200 million
    observatory on Mount Graham this month, Beddow said. Even though
    the fire came within a quarter mile of the cabins and 125 feet of
    the observatory, aggressive firefighting saved the structures.
    Not having many fires ignite at once has also helped, forest
    officials say.
    States like Colorado, where firefighters have been able to catch
    blazes early, have been sending people and equipment to help others
    in the West.
    Firefighting resources from Colorado have been sent to Alaska,
    which is suffering its fourth worst fire season since the 1950s
    thanks to low humidity and winds.
    "We are not just our own little world," Helmerick said. "We
    share throughout the United States, and that is critical."
    ---
    On the Net:
    National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov/
    U.S. Forest Service: http://www.fs.fed.us

    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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  5. #5
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Facts about major wildfires burning across the American West

    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    July 19th

    CALIFORNIA

    -- More than 40,000 acres are burning across the state, from
    eastern San Diego County to Yosemite National Park.

    Foothill Fire
    -- Dry conditions and strong winds are hampering efforts to
    contain a wildfire in northern Los Angeles County.
    -- The blaze has forced thousands of people to flee their homes.
    -- Nearly 1,600 homes in Santa Clarita had been evacuated since
    the fire began Saturday.
    -- No injuries or structural damage have been reported.
    -- A fire spokesman says 600 to 800 homes are in imminent
    danger.
    -- Authorities are taking precautions by evacuating all three
    canyons north of the blaze, as winds fan flames toward homes in the
    communities of Fair Oaks Ranch and Via Princesa, and those on both
    sides of Sand Canyon.
    -- More than 1,000 firefighters are battling fire.
    -- About 4,200 acres have burned so far.
    -- As of Sunday night, the fire was 35 percent contained.
    -- Authorities temporarily closed a 10-mile stretch of the
    Antelope Valley Freeway east of Interstate 5.
    -- The Federal Emergency Management Agency on Sunday approved a
    request for federal funds for the Foothill Fire.

    Melton Fire
    -- Has burned 3,600 acres so far.
    -- The blaze is about 90 miles east of Los Angeles in Riverside
    County.
    -- It is 50 percent contained.
    -- Mandatory evacuation orders were lifted Sunday for about 500
    homes.
    -- Voluntary evacuations have been issued for another 200 homes.
    -- The fire has destroyed three single-wide mobile homes, 7
    vehicles, 11 outbuildings, one motor home and one travel trailer.
    -- Officials say the blaze started when an unidentified person
    shooting target practice sparked a flame that spread to vegetation.
    The person was given a citation and may have to pay all the
    firefighting costs.

    Pine Fire
    -- Has been burning since last Monday.
    -- Located about 45 miles north of Los Angeles.
    -- Officials believe it was caused by arson.
    -- It was about 80 percent contained as of Sunday.
    -- The fire has scorched 17,418 acres.
    -- It has destroyed three homes and five outbuildings.
    -- Two firefighters suffered heat-related injuries and one
    firefighter died in a traffic accident while returning home from
    the fire's front.
    -- Nearly 1,000 people from rural communities had evacuated last
    week but returned to their homes Sunday.

    Diego County
    -- A nearly 9,000-acre fire has been extinguished.
    -- A 92-acre fire is now fully contained.

    Yosemite National Park
    -- A lightning-sparked wildfire is being allowed to burn because
    its slow-moving flames are cleaning the forest floor.
    -- The blaze has scorched at least 3,000 acres.
    -- Several popular trails have been closed because of the fire.


    NEVADA

    -- Hundreds of firefighters are still working to mop up the last
    of the embers from a fire west of Carson City.
    -- Other crews are starting to replant scorched land.
    -- The blaze destroyed 15 homes and briefly threatened the
    governor's mansion.
    -- The fire began early Wednesday and quickly spread to cover
    nearly 76-thousand acres.
    -- At one point, more than 19-hundred firefighters were on the
    lines, aided in an aerial attack by air tankers and helicopters.
    -- As of Monday, the fire is 95 percent contained.
    -- The cost of fighting the fire is estimated at
    four-point-eight (m) million dollars.


    ARIZONA

    -- Hot spots within land charred by a pair of wildfires are
    keeping firefighters from fully containing two blazes on Mount
    Graham.
    -- Firefighters had expected to contain the fires over the
    weekend.
    -- But crews found a lot of hot spots that could prove
    problematic.
    -- Fire managers say it could be midweek before they declare the
    blazes fully contained.
    -- The fires have burned 29,400 acres.
    -- They remain 95 percent contained, as of Sunday night.
    -- Cabin owners and those who work at the observatory on Mount
    Graham are now allowed to return to the area.
    -- The area was evacuated for two weeks because of the fires.
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  6. #6
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    West sees mild start to wildfire season - except in Alaska
    Eds: Previously moved on West wire
    AP Photo AKFAI101
    By ANGIE WAGNER
    Associated Press Writer
    Months before wildfires sweep across the West each year, Lois
    Gruver packs a suitcase with pictures of her four children and her
    favorite paintings. She's always ready to sling it into her trunk
    if flames head toward her home in Bend, Ore.
    "One lightning strike .... You just better be ready and hope it
    never comes," said Gruver, 69, whose neighborhood is surrounded by
    juniper trees.
    The fire season has been a mild one so far for people in the
    West. Fires in California, Arizona and Nevada have made headlines,
    but the 1 million acres that have burned in the Lower 48 states is
    about half the national average this late in the summer.
    But national statistics show this has been one of the worst fire
    seasons in years. The reason, in a word, is Alaska.
    The state is having one of its worst seasons in decades, with
    3.5 million acres of remote and unpopulated forest already charred.
    That is the bulk of the 4.4 million acres of forest that have
    burned this year, according to the National Interagency Fire
    Center.
    But the balance is likely to shift soon, forecasters warn. They
    say the worst is yet to come for the continental United States,
    especially in the Pacific Northwest.
    "Right now probably the Lower 48 has been a little slower than
    normal in terms of not as many fires, not as many acres, as we
    normally have," said Rick Ochoa, national fire weather program
    manager for the Bureau of Land Management in Boise, Idaho. "We
    really haven't had, up until recently, very hot weather in the
    West. ... We've had some rains from time to time that brought a
    little bit of moisture to the fuels."
    Alaska wildfires have a quirky nature all their own.
    Light rain showers have little effect on hot fires in Alaska,
    because the fast-burning black spruce of its forests tend to be
    near quick-drying moss and lichen.
    "They could burn again 20 minutes after it stopped raining,"
    said Pat Garbutt, a fire behavior analyst from Coeur d'Alene,
    Idaho.
    Alaska also has long summer days - 21 hours in parts of the
    Interior - meaning less overnight humidity to calm fires. And fire
    managers say it's sometimes difficult to find fires.
    "One of the biggest challenges here is trying to detect fires
    in such a large expanse," said Allen Chrisman of Bonners Ferry,
    Idaho, and incident commander of the 200,000-acre Wolf Creek fire
    northeast of Fairbanks. "The scale here is so incredible it's out
    of whack with anything in the Lower 48. One mile there is like 500
    miles here."
    Because of Alaska's vast land, limited highways and small
    population, fires are usually just allowed to burn unless they
    threaten people or structures. That means more land will burn than
    in the more populated West.
    Currently, Alaska has about 107 fires burning, but only 20 are
    being fought.
    "The cost to get around these fires and do the same thing they
    do down in the Lower 48 would be just enormous," said Gil Knight,
    spokesman for the Alaska Fire Service in Fairbanks.
    Officials note Alaska is near the usual end of its season, which
    they hope will come on schedule. But in the Lower 48, forecasters
    say, the fires will come, and this year still is likely to be a bad
    one.
    The Pacific Northwest is just now approaching critical fire
    danger, Ochoa said. Fire season shifts from different parts of the
    West throughout the summer and usually doesn't begin in the Pacific
    Northwest and the northern Rockies until about now and runs through
    mid-September. Wildfires in southern California usually pick up
    around late summer.
    "It's starting to crank up here," said Paul Werth, fire
    weather program manager at the Northwest Interagency Coordination
    Center in Portland, Ore. "It's drying out very rapidly."
    Homeowners in Gruver's neighborhood have trimmed trees and
    bushes and used a chipper to make mulch out of the brush.
    "You keep your lawn watered a lot and hopefully you've done a
    good cleanup," she said.
    And, of course, her suitcase is ready to go.
    ---
    EDITOR'S NOTE - Angie Wagner is the AP's Western regional
    writer, based in Las Vegas. Associated Press Writers Ananda Shorey
    in Phoenix and Rachel D'Oro in Anchorage contributed to this
    report.
    ---
    On the Net:
    National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov
    Northwest Interagency Coordination Center:
    http://www.or.blm.gov/nwcc/
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  7. #7
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    BOISE, Idaho (AP) - Recent rains across much of the West have
    brightened the outlook for the current wildfire season, an
    improvement over previous forecasts that predicted another
    catastrophic year like 2003, a top federal official said Wednesday.
    "All in all, it's not going to be as severe as 2003," Bureau
    of Land Management Director Kathleen Clarke said after a briefing
    at the National Interagency Fire Center and meetings with
    firefighters. "I think we're going to be able to get through this
    season just fine."
    Over 4.8 million acres have burned so far this year; 4.5 million
    acres were in Alaska, where the state's second-worst fire season on
    record has commanded the vast majority of the nation's firefighting
    resources. Clarke said rain was expected there this week.
    Fire potential was still significant in California, Washington
    and along the Sierra Nevada range, Clarke said. Still, she said,
    "The lower 48, I think, is well prepared for the next month or
    two."
    Over 4.9 million acres burned nationally last year - 600,000 in
    Alaska, according to fire center statistics.
    Nearly 4,000 firefighters and their equipment remained committed
    to the 15 major active fires still burning Wednesday.
    A hot spot involved a blaze that had blackened 290 acres on
    steep mountain slopes about 35 miles northwest of Las Vegas and
    prompted fire crews to call for reinforcements Wednesday to battle
    the fire. Authorities initially estimated that 1,500 acres had
    burned, but sharply lowered the estimate Wednesday.
    The fire, started Monday by a truck crash in the
    Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, was 40 percent contained. No
    structures were threatened and no new evacuations were ordered.
    "We've asked for some additional resources, including air
    support, and it could be arriving today," said Robbie McAboy, a
    spokeswoman for the firefighters.
    Also in Nevada, a fire started by teenagers playing with
    fireworks destroyed four homes in Reno, but firefighters quickly
    extinguished the blaze and no one was hurt.
    ---
    On the Net:
    National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov
    Bureau of Land Management: http://www.blm.gov

    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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  8. #8
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    By ANGIE WAGNER
    Associated Press Writer
    Usually by now, wildfires are burning up the West as harried
    firefighters scramble from one blaze to the next in a desperate
    quest to put out the flames.
    Not so this year. It's well into fire season and it's been mild.
    So where are the fires?
    Alaska has had an extreme season, with more than 4.4 million
    acres burned. But despite early, intense fires in California, just
    more than 1.1 million acres have been scorched in the Lower 48
    states. The 10-year average for all states is 2.78 million acres.
    "It's slow. It's sloooow," said Rose Davis, spokeswoman for
    the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho.
    The experts aren't fooled.
    Mild temperatures and rain have helped keep flames at bay this
    year, but forecasters caution the worst could still lie ahead. Last
    year, the California wildfires didn't hit until October, and turned
    out to be the most disastrous in state history. Two dozen people
    were killed and more than 3,500 homes were destroyed.
    While the West has been warm, periodic shots of cooler weather
    combined with rain and few dry lightning outbreaks have contributed
    to a slower than normal fire season.
    "Right now, we're sort of in the lull period," said Paul
    Werth, fire weather program manager at the Northwest Interagency
    Coordination Center in Portland, Ore.
    The fire season migrates around the West, with Alaska usually at
    high risk in May and June, and California in September and October.
    Alaska fires have been bad because of warm and dry conditions made
    worse by the extra hours of daylight up north.
    Southern California, with vegetation at record dry levels, has
    had fires earlier than usual. In one week last month, blazes
    scorched more than 48,000 acres, leaving firefighters wondering
    what the fall will bring. Fires haven't burned as many acres as
    they usually do, but the intensity has surprised scientists and
    firefighters. Humidity and cool air has spared the state from more
    wildfires, but fire risk is increasing because of a heat wave that
    moved in last weekend.
    "The fuels, the brush, the grass and things like that have
    never been this dry before," said Rick Ochoa, national fire
    weather program manager for the Bureau of Land Management in Boise,
    Idaho.
    The next few months will tell the tale, as the heat rises,
    storms slow and Santa Ana winds blow through Southern California.
    "That's one of the big fears. Even though we have had a
    relatively mild season, there's still that potential out there,"
    Ochoa said. "We know if we get that dry lightning, we know if we
    get those Santa Anas, we're going to have some major problems."
    Firefighters have kept busy clearing brush, helping out in
    Alaska and battling the smaller fires around the West.
    "I'd probably do a lot of things different if I knew right now
    what the rest of the fire season's going to be,' said Guy Pence,
    fire and aviation staff officer for the Boise National Forest.
    "We're just asking our firefighters to be prepared. We're not
    through fire season yet."
    Forecasters say temperatures will heat up this week across the
    West and fuels will continue to bake and dry.
    "This could be the last rain we get for a month and a half,"
    Werth said. "Until the middle of September, we really have to be
    very watchful. It won't take too long for the fuels to dry out."
    Werth and Ochoa agree: it's just too early to call this season a
    calm one.
    "I've seen a lot of seasons that look mild up until the last
    part of August, and then all of a sudden things go berserk," Werth
    said. "All it takes is a week or two of hot, dry weather and then
    get some lightning or wind in."
    ---
    EDITOR'S NOTE - Angie Wagner is the AP's Western regional
    writer, based in Las Vegas.
    ---
    On the Net:
    Northwest Interagency Coordination Center:
    http://www.or.blm.gov/nwcc/
    National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  9. #9
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post US and Canada Update

    WASHINGTON

    Wenatchee Fire

    -- A wind-blown wildfire that had forced hundreds to flee their
    homes grew to more than 11,000 acres as it moved into dry brush and
    grass in central Washington.
    -- The blaze is 20 miles northwest of Wenatchee.
    -- It's destroyed one home and damaged another residence and an
    outbuilding.
    -- No one has been injured.
    -- A fire information officer says smoke from the fire forced
    crews to temporarily close U.S. Route 2 between Cashmere and
    Dryden.
    -- Residents have been told to leave two more canyons threatened
    by the fire.
    -- More than 1,500 firefighters are assigned to the blaze.
    -- Authorities believe it was started by humans.
    -- The fire has been burning since August 8.

    Okanogan and Wenatchee National Forests

    -- A series of lightning storms elsewhere in central Washington
    ignited 18 fires in the Okanogan and Wenatchee national forests.
    -- One of the largest, northwest of Twisp, grew to 600 acres.

    Lake Chelan

    -- Washington's largest blaze, a complex or group of three
    fires, has blackened a total of 47,390 acres near Lake Chelan.
    -- The fires are 85 percent contained.


    CALIFORNIA

    French Gulch

    -- A northern California wildfire that destroyed 22 homes and
    two businesses in a historic gold mining town has grown to nearly
    10,000 acres.
    -- Officials say the blaze is 25 percent contained.
    -- Full containment is expected late Friday.
    -- The fire has now moved into an uninhabited area of forest.


    BRITISH COLUMBIA

    -- Fire officials say a storm that passed over the province last
    night generated seven-thousand lightning strikes.
    -- They triggered 140 new fires, bringing the total number in
    the province to 479.
    -- Of those, 281 fires are requiring firefighting crews on site.
    They include initial attack crews on new fires, crews on existing
    blazes or fires in the mop-up stage.

    Whitecap Creek Fire

    -- Located west of Lillooet, Canada.
    -- A fire information officer says helicopters have been
    attacking the area and cooling it considerably.
    -- But the fire is not yet to the point where officials can lift
    an evacuation alert for the Seton Lake area.
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  10. #10
    Sr. Information Officer NJFFSA16's Avatar
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    Post August 23rd

    Rain, cooler temperatures help contain fires in Washington

    DRYDEN, Wash. (AP) - Rain and cooler temperatures in central
    Washington are good news for firefighters and for residents of more
    than 300 evacuated homes who've been allowed to return.
    The weather helped firefighters get lines cut around an entire
    16-thousand-400-acre wildfire. The Forest Service says, though,
    that some of the lines are preliminary. Until they're improved, the
    fire is rated 85-percent contained, a big jump from 24 hours
    earlier.
    The two-week-old fire destroyed one home and damaged several
    other buildings. It's believed to be human-caused, but
    investigators have ruled out arson.
    The blaze is one of ten large fires now burning in Washington
    state.
    The National Interagency Fire Center in Idaho says there are
    nine other major fires burning in Western states -- three in
    Alaska, three in Oregon, two in Idaho and one in Wyoming.
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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