1. #1
    Senior Member
    Dalmatian90's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,120

    Default Oh, now this is just a lovingly well maintained barn...

    Town north of mine had a live-burn Sunday morning on one of a number of former farms in town owned by the Audobon Society or other conservation groups. Figured that was a good excuse to throw my camera in my camelback and combine a Sunday morning bike ride with a bit of buffing.

    As I'm getting ready to head out, I take a look in one of the barns not scheduled to go. I'd say circa 1950 from it's size and construction.

    It's a "bank barn" built into the side of a bank, so you can back hay wagons right into for unloading, and in a good hay year you do see this full by the end of the year. Not very full this year!

    Ok, not the best shot but a bit of perspective:


    So, I'm walking in...and nearly trip over this:

    Gee, holes in the floor covered with hay. Yee Haw.

    Looking up ain't much better:

    At first I only noticed the cracked rafters till I started to try and frame a good picture and said, Ohhhhh...I'd love to know the story behind a 6' section of roof rafter just plain missing!

    Finally, under the blue board is another hole. They through a board over it to let the haywagons back over it, but the board is just loose:


    Just to things to keep in the back of ones mind looking at buildings. Not every incident would be a heavy fire showing write it off scenario -- you could have anything from smouldering hay bales that need to be dug out, to a wandering kid ignoring the "danger" signs and wandering in to trip & fall.
    IACOJ Canine Officer
    20/50

  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber
    jthomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cortlandt Manor, NY
    Posts
    86

    Default Re: Oh, now this is just a lovingly well maintained barn...

    Originally posted by Dalmatian90
    Ohhhhh...I'd love to know the story behind a 6' section of roof rafter just plain missing!
    It's patching another hole in the floor somewhere!
    If you can't fix it with baling wire and a claw hammer, it can't be fixed!
    I suppose on the bright side, for a structure like this, 99 times out of 100 nobody will even consider entering. Would this type of structure warrant an initial VES? I can't imagine a chief ordering a member inside an old barn, unless you have someone right there screaming that somebody is trapped inside...
    Surround it and drown it, wash off the foundation. Most likely, it WILL be fully engulfed by the time any apparatus arrives.
    But to your point, it's the 1 time out of 100 that will kick your *****.

  3. #3
    Sr. Information Officer
    NJFFSA16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    25 NW of the GW
    Posts
    8,434

    Lightbulb

    Sometimes....the application of water is only delaying the inevitable.

    Protect exposures....let it burn, and everyone goes home. (Hours earlier too!)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  4. #4
    Forum Member
    FiftyOnePride's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    471

    Default

    Originally posted by NJFFSA16
    Sometimes....the application of water is only delaying the inevitable.

    Protect exposures....let it burn, and everyone goes home. (Hours earlier too!)
    Oh indeed!
    JLS
    MFC
    51 Pride - R.I.P. Sandy
    Alarm 200644004, I won't ever forget.


    Remember you only have 1*.

    IACOJ

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Dalmatian90's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,120

    Default

    Like I said, that's not always an option.

    What happens when you have a slow-smouldering fire? Gonna sit around for the next 12 hours till it breaks out? Going to explain to the insurance company why you used an excavator with no fire showing? There may be times and building conditions you have to do that, there may be times you go, "Know what, we've got to plank over these trouble spots then we can to xyz."

    What happens the day you need to go in for some kid who was playing around?

    Or the day the hay wagon goes through the floor?

    Heavy fire, yep stand back and open up the deck gun. But you still need to be aware of the buildings and what hazards you may face in your district (or neighbors -- we'd be water supply on this one), and sometimes those moments of learning just happen along.
    IACOJ Canine Officer
    20/50

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    kghemtp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    726

    Default

    Ya know Dal, good point. So often we think about regular structures, houses or commercial buildings. These special structures can have all kinds of hazards that we don't frequently consider (and with SO many barns across our countryside, we'll all encounter fires in our careers).
    ~Kevin
    Firefighter/Paramedic
    --^v--^v--^v--^v--
    Of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong
    Dennis Miller

  7. #7
    Forum Member
    Bones42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Pt. Beach, NJ
    Posts
    10,686

    Default somewhere off topic...

    Heavy fire, yep stand back and open up the deck gun.
    Had this thought the other day when looking at some of the pics on firehouse.com of fully involved buildings and master streams. Why? Meaning, if the building is that fully involved, why bother putting deck guns and elevated master streams on it? Protect exposures and let the thing burn unimpeded by those streams. You are not going to save anything, you are most likely only going to prolong the process. Why not just let it go on it's own?
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber
    jthomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cortlandt Manor, NY
    Posts
    86

    Default Re: somewhere off topic...

    Originally posted by Bones42
    Why not just let it go on it's own?
    It's fun and it looks good? I dunno.
    I suppose doing as you suggest (it kind of makes sense from a practical point of view) would be pretty hard to rationalize to the voters/public the next time the FD needs more or renewed funding. I imagine the apparent non-action of letting it burn, even while protecting the exposures would not sit well with people in general.
    Just my opinion, though.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Dalmatian90's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,120

    Default

    Sometimes let it burn is an option.

    We've done that with an uninsured barn. The "most likely" cause was kind of apparent since there was Romex coming out of the kitchen window and across the field to the sheep barn. Rainy winter morning at oh-dark-thirty. Chiefs woke up the owner (who along with his whole family was still asleep -- a newspaper delivery guy called it in) and talked it over with him. We never even pulled a line off the trucks, just watched it for an hour and went home.

    Reasons to extinguish can include, though:
    -- Preservation of any remaining crime scene evidence
    -- Preservation of human remains if the building was thought possibly occupied
    -- Some fires, like hay, could smoulder for days or weeks with fairly significant amounts of smoke -- think a giant sized pile of wet leaves. Put it out so it's not an annoyance to neighbors.
    IACOJ Canine Officer
    20/50

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register