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    Question xxxxx

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
    Last edited by brain615; 03-23-2009 at 09:45 PM.

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    Good luck with that one man, Here in Wisconsin it's up to the company... I almost got fired for responding to an accident that had my companies employees involved. So much for respect...

    Yeah, I don't work there anymore, now I'm a customer service rep for 5 alarm fire and safety!

    Love my job!

    Your friend in WI, Spctcl

    I remember 343!

    www.rememberrally.com

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    Don't know, but I e-mailed your question it to my father-in-law who's retired from the Everton VFD in Fayette County. I'll post what he answers. My sife said he did occasionally leave work to respond to calls, but that she wasn't sure if it was because the company HAD to let him go or CHOSE to let him go.

    California does have a law that prevents employers from taking any disciplinary or discriminatory action against an employee who is a volunteer FF and takes time off work to respond to an emergency.
    Chris Gaylord
    Emergency Planner / Fire Captain, UC Santa Cruz FD

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    I've already asked my employeers and from both of my jobs, it's basiclly, no, you can't leave. So, as a back-up, I've asked to not work night shifts so much so I can be availbile for Fire/EMS calls at night when I get onto a Fire Department.


    -Jason
    "The gem cannot be polished without friction, nor man perfected without trials."

    "One of the greatest discoveries a man makes, one of his great surprises, is to find he can do what he was afraid he couldn't do." - Henry Ford

    "Don't wait for a light to appear at the end of the tunnel, stride down there...and light the bloody thing yourself." - Sara Henderson

    "The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me...the Lord hath anointed me to preach good tidings...to bind up the broken hearted." - The Healing One

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    xxxxxxxxxxx
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    Default Here's your answer

    Howdy. I ran into this myself last week when I missed worked to goto a fire. I heard about the law in Indiana and after poking around on the internet for awhile, I found this.

    SOURCE: IC 36-8-12-10.5; (04)IN1257.1.1. --> SECTION 1. IC 36-8-12-10.5 IS ADDED TO THE INDIANA CODE AS A NEW SECTION TO READ AS FOLLOWS [EFFECTIVE JULY 1, 2004]: Sec. 10.5. (a) This section does not apply to an employee of the state subject to IC 4-15-10-7.
    (b) This section applies to an employee of a political subdivision who:
    (1) is a volunteer firefighter; and
    (2) has notified the employee's employer in writing that the employee is a volunteer firefighter.
    (c) An employer may not discipline an employee:
    (1) for being absent from employment by reason of responding to a fire or emergency call that was received before the time that the employee was to report to employment; or
    (2) for leaving the employee's duty station to respond to a fire or an emergency call if the employee has secured authorization from the employee's supervisor to leave the
    duty station in response to a fire or an emergency call received after the employee has reported to work.
    (d) An employer may require an employee who has been absent from employment as set forth in subsection (c)(1) or (c)(2) to present a written statement from the fire chief or other officer in charge of the volunteer fire department at the time of the absence indicating that the employee was engaged in emergency firefighting or emergency activity at the time of the absence.
    (e) An employee who is disciplined by the employer in violation of subsection (c) may bring a civil action against the employer in the county of employment. In the action, the employee may seek the following:
    (1) Payment of back wages.
    (2) Reinstatement to the employee's former position.
    (3) Fringe benefits wrongly denied or withdrawn.
    (4) Seniority rights wrongly denied or withdrawn.
    An action brought under this subsection must be filed within one (1) year after the date of the disciplinary action.

    You can get it from http://www.in.gov/legislative/bills/.../IN1257.1.html

    It apparently just went into affect July 1, 2004 which is a good thing for us Indiana folk Anyways, hope this helps. I just printed that out and took it into work along with a copy of the report with conf. info blacked out.
    ---Steve---

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    Originally posted by brain615
    bump....still haven't gotten an answer....and its great that you guys are trying to help out, but it really doesn't help me at all to know how it is in alaska or florida or wherever....I need Indiana info
    Then post it in the Indiana forums- http://cms.firehouse.com/forums2/for...hp?forumid=380
    And don't give your bosses a hard time about working around your volunteer activities. They are paying you to give your all for their business. They could care less about what you want to cram into whatever time off you have until it starts interfering with your coming to work on time or being available to work when they need you. You push them to far or bother them with too many non-work related requests and you could find yourself on their S**tlist. No raises, promotions, ect because you keep bothering them with questions about getting out of work to go volunteer while everyone else stays at work covering your workload. Just be happy you have a paying job or two and don't even carry your pager to work. There will be plenty of calls to go to when you are at home enjoying your favorite meal or having private time with your spouse.

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    Ya I didnt even bother to ask if I could leave work to goto a call because I AM there to work and get paid for it. Plus it would take me like 20 min to get from work to the station even with my lights going so there is no point in trying. IF there is a call before I am ready and leaving to goto work, I will goto it and be late for work, but once I am on my way, I will not go UNLESS it is a big call where I know they will need my help. I do not carry my pager when I am working even, it is left in my truck turned off. I will then check the run reports to see if we did get anything while I was working when I am down at station for whatever. And there have been times like everyone has where I have missed calls, jumped outta the showed to make one, left dinner getting cold, and left my other half sittin around in the middle of a movie at home to goto a call. I will not goto a call when I am haveing Private time with my other half
    ---Steve---

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    xxxxxxxxxxxxxx
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    Originally posted by brain615
    Thanks for pointing out the obvious though, like I'm some kind of retard
    Brian, I don't think he was doing it to make you look like a retard, but rather to make sure you were seeing things from the employers point of view. if your employer has no problems if you leave for a fire call, then by all means go for it. but remember, when you leave, it's not like the work goes with you. it still needs to get done. after all, your being paid to be working from 9-5 (or whatever your hours are). your boss is expecting you to be there, and counting on you doing your work. if your running fire calls, then your boss isn't getting what he is paying you for.

    as for pointing out the obvious, well, some people don't always see the obvious. many young volunteers (between the ages of 16 and 30) sometimes get tunnel vision, thinking their lives revolve around the fire department. they sometimes forget about work, school (ie, leaving class for fire calls while in high school), and family, and how these things need to come before the FD. some people just need a reminder, or just to see how the other side veiws things. don't take it personally.
    If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

    FF/EMT/DBP

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    IC 36-8-12-10.5 IS ADDED TO THE INDIANA CODE AS A NEW SECTION TO READ AS FOLLOWS [EFFECTIVE JULY 1, 2004]:

    That right there tells me that it is a law. It says ADDED to the Indiana Code and EFFECTIVE as of July 1, 2004. Like I said in my 1st post, I printed that exact thing off, gave it to my employer and they took it as a law and I have had no problems.
    ---Steve---

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    Here In Nova Scotia..I know where I work I can only leave or be late for Structure Fires...anything else..No go.....Most buisnesses the owners are good about letting members respond as long as if they are not needed they return to work ASAP....I know for members in High School..Theres..Well I dunno if you wanna call it a law or not but where a teacher cannot stop a student from leaving EXCEPT during a test or Exam..Otherwise...Free To Go..Obviously not Indiana I know..
    If someone with multiple personalities threatens to kill himself, is it considered a hostage situation?

    Ryan

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    I know where I am you sign up for shifts you are not always on I am with a FF/EMS squad... most of us are not both, I am EMS. If you are oncall and work it's your issue with your company.. what I have done is I take a paid vacation day and schedule myself for a day shift. I loose a holiday but the rewards are worth more then any holiday. If I get a call at 4:45 am and I don't get back for 3 hours I will only be a few minutes late. No big deal, very very rarely does an ems call run longer then an hour and a half including cleaning the rig.

    That said most employers here are fine if a FF is called out to a scene but not EMS.... go figure

    I am in NH. There are no laws, and its a hard call if there should be. How different is it from being with the Guards, and how important is it to towns who like us have no paid personel and could never afford to. This is included for businesses. If a business is on fire and people who are FF's don't work at that company then it would just burn to the ground. Its a very hard place to be in and one our group is trying to deal with which is why I take a vaction day to be "ON-Call"
    Last edited by Flutt3rby; 08-03-2004 at 02:18 PM.

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    A fellow firefighter ran into a similar problem with his employer and turned to me for help. He had missed work due to a major structure fire that began prior to his shift start time.

    I contacted the IVFA for help. I asked them about the law you are inquiring about. They stated the law only applies to state employees. I have attempted to attach the link for the state law below.

    http://www.ai.org/legislative/ic/cod...ml#IC4-15-10-7

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    hi i am a vol ff/emt in Vermont. I am also female. I know with any job i have i can't not leave to go to a fire or ems call. The job i work at now i am one of the first on scene since i am the dispatcher for my town. My father who is also a vol ff/emt can only leave work for the big ones and then it is when he is requested. He works 20 min (speed limit) away HAve seen a time when he makes it to the scene in 10.
    Last edited by giggleshpd; 08-05-2004 at 01:24 PM.

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    Smile I always responded

    Since I have always been self-employed and within four blocks of the station, this was never a problem. It did at times cost me money to respond. When I was in the Army at Ft. Gordon, GA, I joined a department where I lived. (Martinez) Since I had a desk job, I could leave during the day for fire calls. It drove the MP's on the gate nuts when I would leave post with lights and siren.

    Stay safe,

    Pete
    Pete Sinclair
    Hartford, MI
    IACOJ (Retired Division)

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    In Ohio, you can be late or miss work if you are already at a fire

    Leaving work to go to a fire is a different story

    Unless of course, the CEO of your company used to be a vollie chief
    and he knows that you, as a vollie chief sometimes needs to go:
    Knowing that you are professional and will catch up on your work

    I have missed/been late maybe 5 days in 3 years for fd duties

    3 of those days I had to leave from work, but my employer doesn't have to let me take off.

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    It says in IC 36-8-12-10.5 and I quote

    "(a) This section does not apply to an employee of the state subject to IC 4-15-10-7."

    Which is what that 3Swings posted and can be found here: http://www.ai.org/legislative/ic/cod...ml#IC4-15-10-7

    IC 36-8-12-10.5 is for us regular employees, not employees of the state. Also in finding if it is actually a law yet, I have more reason to believe it is because I can now find it on

    http://www.ai.org/legislative/ic/cod...IC36-8-12-10.5

    right there in the other Indiana Coded and I could not before, i found it seprately before. Brain615 did you find out the answer for sure yet?
    ---Steve---

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    I think the buzz word here is common sense. We all think that the calls are important but we have to look at the employers perspective as well. They are , in many cases relying on you to be there really don't care why you may not be. I follow a 3 rule,where I don't respond to any runs 3 hours before I am scheduled to be at work. My employers understand but I don't feel they should be inconvienced because of my hobbies.

    Just my thoughts.

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    Priorities:

    Family, Job, Fire Dept.
    The only way it can work long term.

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    I, for one, am one of the lukey ones. My employer allows 8 hours a week paid to respond to emergency. I understand the employeers point but who is on the fire dept? I don't see many 65-80 year olds that are retired on it so what do you have? You have 18-65 year olds that work. If it was their buisness, house, family traped, I bet they wouldn't complain. I don't care who you are, a life is more important than work. I am not saying that they have to pay you like the situation that I am in but they should be a little more forgiving.

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    Originally posted by jjsjrs
    I, for one, am one of the lukey ones. My employer allows 8 hours a week paid to respond to emergency. I understand the employeers point but who is on the fire dept? I don't see many 65-80 year olds that are retired on it so what do you have? You have 18-65 year olds that work. If it was their buisness, house, family traped, I bet they wouldn't complain. I don't care who you are, a life is more important than work. I am not saying that they have to pay you like the situation that I am in but they should be a little more forgiving.
    Lukey....Employeer

    Hopefully You Check Your Spelling Better At Work..
    If someone with multiple personalities threatens to kill himself, is it considered a hostage situation?

    Ryan

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