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  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Exclamation This Weeks Safety Message

    This came in from my weekly Safety Smart emailer.

    This “Absolute Shocker” was spotted by a subscriber in country Victoria. It’s unclear whether the sign is supporting the controller or the controller is supporting the sign. Either way, he earns our nomination for next year’s Spanish “running of the bulls”, as he is a very cool customer when it comes to vehicular charges from both directions.

    Some of the traffic management failures apparent in these photos are:

    Inadequate advance warning for approaching motorists.
    Lack of signage.
    Lack of protection for the controller.
    Inadequate and confusing control methods. Exactly why is the controller positioned mid-road?
    Our subscriber did the right thing by bringing his concerns to the contractor’s attention. This action quickly rectified the situation.

    Absolute Shocker of the Week is published by WorkSafe Victoria’s Construction & Utilities Program in the interests of promoting safer work practices. It may be freely copied. To receive our free weekly emailed newsletter, Safety Soapbox, simply email construction@workcover.vic.gov .au and provide your name, organisation, position, telephone contact and preferred email address.
    WorkSafe Victoria is a division of the Victorian WorkCover Authority.


    Keep your Stick on the Ice out there!
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    HoustonChronicle.com

    July 22, 2004, 1:36AM

    Trash collector's death investigated

    His family says his employer's response was slow and inappropriate
    By LEIGH HOPPER Copyright 2004 Houston Chronicle

    BODY HEAT

    The federal agency charged with assuring the safety and health of workers is investigating the May 26 heat-related death of a 22-year-old garbage collector who died his second day on the job hauling trash on one of the city's most grueling routes.

    The family of Theon L. Harrison says Republic Waste Services' response to the emergency was slow and inappropriate. Harrison was placed, they say, unconscious, in a non-air-conditioned garbage truck cab even though a heat stroke victim should be moved to a cool, shaded area to rest. Although emergency treatment is paramount, paramedics were not called until a company supervisor arrived on the scene, hours after Harrison first reported symptoms, the family said.

    Harrison was one of the first three fatal victims of Harris County's heat this year, and is an example of an occupational hazard faced by Houston laborers who work outdoors. Other heat death victims this year included a 71-year-old man who was mowing his lawn, and a toddler found locked in a car.

    "I think the crew took the appropriate measures. Heat is always an issue for us and anyone who works outside," said Will Flower, a spokesman for the Florida-based garbage company, which employs 300 in Houston. "We go through extensive training of our people to avoid all types of potential dangers including heat."

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has no standards that specifically address heat, but it investigates all on-the-job fatalities. Since 1986, OSHA has issued 61 "general duty citations" for heat-related fatalities in a five-state region that includes Texas. In 2002, the Department of Labor counted 61 fatalities nationwide caused by heat extremes, including heat strokes.

    An OSHA investigator in Houston said the Republic Waste investigation would be completed in about a month.

    Other trash collection companies, such as Waste Management, and the city of Houston's Solid Waste Department say they give employees extensive information about responding to a heat emergency. Waste Management periodically tests drivers on the contents of its safety manual. The city gives its workers a card from OSHA that describes symptoms and steps to take.

    Harrison's brother, 19-year-old Maurice Harrison, who drives a truck for Republic Waste, said heat stress may have been a topic addressed in reading material he was given when he started his job a year ago. But most training focused on operation of equipment, he said.

    The day after Theon Harrison died, water coolers were distributed to all the workers at the beginning of the day. About a month later, the company — which paid for Harrison's funeral, the family said — held a training session about heat stress.

    "After this incident occurred, we did in fact emphasize the need for paying attention to potential heat injuries," Flower said. "I think that's a responsible thing to do. If someone gets hurt, it doesn't hurt to ensure everyone makes sure they're drinking plenty of liquids."

    Theon's mother, Frances Blow, said her son had no health problems that she knew of. He was thrilled to be starting a job that would allow him to provide for his 1-year-old daughter, she said. Theon had waited a long time for the job, she said, frequently asking his brother to put in a good word for him.

    On the day he died, Theon and his brother, who shared an apartment, rode to work together. Maurice was concerned that his brother was assigned to start on the Hopper Road route, where workers manually pick up three to four cans per residence for nine hours.

    "That route is not for a beginner," Maurice Harrison said. "That route will break you."

    What happened that afternoon remains unclear, pieced together by the family from conversations with Theon's co-workers.

    Blow said her son complained to his driver that he felt ill after lunch, about 1:30 or 2 p.m. The crew's supervisor, contacted by phone, directed Harrison to rest in the truck's cab as work continued.

    They remembered the driver telling them that Harrison mumbled something and then "went to sleep." The driver noticed something coming from Harrison's mouth and called his supervisor again. The supervisor said he was coming to the scene.

    The family was told the driver attempted to find help at a fire station located near Hopper Road and Bentley, only to find the station closed. (A number of Houston's fire stations are closed for renovation or permanently shuttered, said Houston Fire Department EMS medical director David Persse.)

    Paramedics were called sometime after 4:30 p.m. and an unresponsive Harrison was transported to LBJ Hospital with a 109-degree temperature, Blow said. The driver and supervisor could not be reached for comment.

    "What was he telling you, that you didn't respond to sooner?" Blow wants to ask her son's co-workers.

    She said she keeps thinking how close he was to her north Houston home as precious minutes ticked by. She doesn't know why her son's co-workers didn't take him inside a nearby store, or drive him to a nearby hospital.

    Harrison's stepfather, Donald Blow, got to the hospital nearly an hour after Harrison was brought there. He put his hand on Harrison's lifeless cheek, then his chest, in a goodbye gesture.

    "He was still hot," Blow said.

    leigh.hopper@chron.com

    When the body is unable to cool itself through sweating, serious heat illness or death can result.
    Exhaustion symptoms
    • Dry skin with no sweating
    •mood changes such as irritability or confusion
    • Upset stomach
    • Fainting or passing out.
    What to do:
    • Act immediately. If not treated, heat exhaustion may advance to heat stroke or death.
    • Move the victim to a cool, shaded area. Don't leave the person alone. Lay the victim on his or her back. If symptoms include dizziness, lay the victim on his or her back and raise the legs 6 to 8 inches. If symptoms include nausea, lay the victim on his or her side.
    • Loosen and remove any heavy clothing.
    •Have the person drink cool water, about a cup every 15 minutes, unless sick to his or her stomach.
    •Cool the person's body by fanning and spraying with a cool mist of water or wiping the victim with a wet cloth.
    • Call 911 for emergency help if the person does not feel better in a few minutes.
    Source: OSHA Web site


    I find it interesting that OSHA does not have a specific guideline for heat related injuries. They seem to have information on pretty much every other aspect of work environments.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Aug. 3, 2004, 12:45AM

    Fireman overcome by heat while fighting blaze at abandoned house

    By MIKE GLENN Copyright 2004 Houston Chronicle

    A veteran firefighter was overcome by heat late Monday while battling a blaze that gutted an apparently abandoned house in south Houston.

    The small, wood-framed structure at Alvin and Southview went up in flames shortly before 10 p.m, Houston Fire Department officials said.

    "We had an extremely difficult time entering the building due to the age and the deterioration of it," said HFD District Chief Wallace Page.

    Fire crews made an initial attack from within the burning house but soon were forced to evacuate and continue the battle from outside.

    The firefighter overcome by the heat, an HFD captain, needed some help to get out of the house but never lost consciousness. He was being treated at the scene by paramedics.

    "He's awake, alert and oriented and he's going to the hospital for precautionary reasons," Page said.

    He said firefighters typically face heat exhaustion throughout the year regardless of the extreme temperatures and stifling humidity.

    "The amount of physical exertion, the weight and thickness of the gear that they wear, and the (heat) off the fire itself just naturally generate that kind of condition," Page said.

    There were no other reported injuries at the scene and HFD officials said the building appeared to be empty when the fire erupted.

    "With the amount of destruction, it's hard to tell," Page said. "There were very few contents in there. The gas meter was nonexistent and we're not sure if the power was turned on to the house."

    Firefighters brought the burning building under control within about 30 minutes. HFD arson officers were still at the scene late Monday to determine the cause of the fire.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

  4. #4
    Forum Member martinm's Avatar
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    "Fireman overcome by heat while fighting blaze at abandoned house"

    If they knew/thought it was abandoned, why did they need to go inside?

    Just seems like they were asking for trouble.
    United Kingdom branch, IACOJ.

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