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  1. #1
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    Thumbs down Bridgeport hiring felons Heats up for the bad

    Lawyer: Can't bar felons from civil jobs

    By AARON LEO aleo@ctpost.com

    BRIDGEPORT

    State law bars municipalities from imposing a ban on hiring felons solely because of their criminal records, according to the lawyer for a city firefighter candidate with a felony conviction on his record.

    Two candidates for city firefighter have felony convictions.

    Earl King Jr. served several months in federal prison for bagging crack cocaine for the Peeler drug gang. Edward Valderrama has a felony conviction of an undisclosed nature. Valderrama declined comment on the advice of his lawyer.

    King is ranked 16th on the city's firefighter hiring list, and Valderrama is ranked 91st. The Civil Service Commission placed them on the list despite a civil service guideline barring hiring of felons. The commission is reviewing its decision.

    The city has not hired new firefighters from the hiring list.

    In spite of the Civil Service Commission's informal guideline, the city itself does not specifically bar felons from civil service jobs.




    OTHER ARTICLES IN THIS SECTION
    8/13/2004
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    - Ringmaster assumes Barnum Fest role
    - Trumbull urged to move on pre-school
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    - Rell releases money to hire ethics staffers
    - Rains flood vault at Bridgeport City Hall
    - 4 teens gorge in 1st pizza fritta eating contest
    - Stratford students focus on science at summer camp
    - Heist suspect denies role in criminal spree
    - 2nd suspect denies looting credit union
    - Target store said unlikely for Fairfield
    - State scholars picked as Fulbright winners
    - Parent's outrage leads library to pull novel for young adults




    King's lawyer, Susan Wallace, said the commission is trying to remove her client from the list based only on his conviction, in violation of state discrimination laws. She spoke to a reporter at the commission's meeting Tuesday, while the panel was in closed session.

    The law allows employers to deny employment to convicted felons only after considering the type of crime and its relationship to the job requirements, as well as how long ago the conviction occurred and the degree of rehabilitation.

    The issue attracted the attentions of state Sen. Ernest E. Newton II and Rep. Charles D. Clemons Jr., both D-Bridgeport, who supported the candidates.

    "There's only one judge. We know who that is

    God," Clemons, a retired city firefighter, said before the meeting.

    Newton said, "You can't be rehabilitated if you can't get a job.

    "Should you be denied employment opportunities for the rest of the rest of your life [because of a felony conviction]?"

    Minority city firefighters groups also support Valderrama and King.

    But Fire Chief Michael Maglione said before the meeting that convicted felons cannot be trusted in the Fire Department.

    "There is a level of trust that is an essential part of the whole thing," he said. "Firefighters go into people's homes."

    He argued that even if the conviction occurred years ago and the candidates have not backslid, they "forfeited [their] opportunity to work in emergency public services."

    On Tuesday, the commission again reviewed Valderrama's case in closed session and tabled it until September's meeting.

    King's case, which the commission did not discuss Tuesday, will continue at October's meeting.

    A city councilman recently proposed an ordinance banning people with violent felony convictions from working in civil service jobs.

    Wallace called the term "convicted felon" misleading and stigmatizing.

    A felony is a charge

    not necessarily violent

    that carries a prison term of at least a year upon conviction, she said.

    Aaron Leo, who covers regional issues, can be reached at 330-6222.


  2. #2
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    If you are convicted, in a court of law, of a felony, then you are a convicted felon. The use of the term may mislead people into connotations of something other than the actual circumstances under which you were convicted, but you still are a convicted felon.

    A convicted felon should have, as all of us should, the opportunity to prove themselves to themselves and others as useful members of society. Being able to perform a job such as this might be exactly what the individual needs to find that they are indeed of some value in the world. It is a terrible feeling to think that you are unworthy in the world and a great feeling to be accepted for what you can do and give to this job.

    So I would have to vote to give the individual a chance and a job.

    With the proviso that if he backslides he be executed and dumped in an unmarked grave.

    Life is, afterall, tough.

  3. #3
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    With the proviso that if he backslides he be executed and dumped in an unmarked grave.

    Unfortunately with Bridgeport...that's not a joke but a real possibility.

    In the late 1980s Bridgeport had the highest per capita murder rate in the U.S....by the mid 90s it was down to like 10th place, and now it's in the 70th-something place. Of course a lot of the drug dealers locked up in the late 80s to mid 90s are now coming up for parole and/or the end of their sentences.
    IACOJ Canine Officer
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    Just a question.Are felons allowed to practice law in Connecticut?If not,I think attorney Wallace should start by getting her profession more 'politically correct' and compassionate.


    P.S. Thank you Chief Maglione for sticking to your convictions(can I use that word?).Being a member of the fire service used to represent a certain level of character quality.

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    Default Some make mistakes, some are made to be mistakes.

    I'm sitting here trying to find information about still being a firefighter while having a felony conviction.
    Back in '99 I got married. During the courtship everything was great. Soon after the marriage things turned south and over time she became very verbally abusive. We decided that I would close my company, where I was gone much of the time but made a great income, to be near home now that we had our first son. I joined a volunteer fire department, got my EMT-B and went through the local Fire Academy. In two years I was one of the most trained and certified firefighters in the department, since the academy couldn't be done by everyone and most had suffered the long term of catching night classes as they could. My marriage at that point was terrible, there was no affection, no acceptance, and growing anamosity for me. In addition I was now brining home very little money comparred to her 85k. I reached a point after counceling, pastors, and seminars that I had to send a message that the marriage wasn't going to work as it was. I chose to separate from her and get some space between us. I still saw my boys at that time but nothing changed between us. I was doing much better at the fire department, my supervisors taking an interest in me and grooming me to become a lieutenant and take my new knowlege and teach new subordinates and rookies. after a year passed we decided to go for divorce (her dicision). Shortly after hiring an attorney and us starting to argue over her wanting to move three hours away and me not wanting to be an (every other weekend daddy), all communication ceased. Then, at the advisement of her attorney they opened a case against me for child porn. She knew that I was looking at internet porn while we were still together, but now separated and doing so well at the fire department, I had a new direction and drive in my life. I was taken into custody, my computer seized and was immediatly fired from the Fire Department and the EMS ambulance service that I worked at. The local News aired a story on "The local firefighter arrested who confessed to having sex with children as young as 5 years old". DSS got involved and and found no evidence of abuse but agreed that the viewing of porn was a risk. I went through evaluations, polygraph examinations, and Sex offender specific evaluations. All of which showed that I have never been interested in kids, pursued kids, had sex with anyone "underage", or have any hidden desires to enguage in sexual relations with those "underage". After a year and 3 months and recreating past history on my hard drive Porn was found to be on my computer during the time I stated and while I was still married living with her. The history also showed that as I continued looking at it, it grew to a level that would be classified as an addictive compulsive disorder. Now I have gone to court over 5 pictures that were in my deleted history and been charged with 5 counts of sexual exploitation of a minor. A sex crime on my record for 10 years and a felony for life. Since my separation I have not viewed porn, have no interest in it since I got out of that relationship. My Ex however got immediate full custody of my boys, the ability to move where ever she wants, and while the judge allows me to be around my boys, my Ex is now long gone and I have no way of finding them.
    As for the local News, I can't go after them for slander in reporting that I confessed to having sex with kids as young as 5, because they just claim they were reporting the information that the Sheriffs department gave them.
    The sheriffs dept. isn't liable because they were conducting an investigation to see if I was worse that what I was confessing to be, "looking at porn in my basement while in a poor marriage.
    The article above brings up an interesting question. If a person with a felony should be able to be a firefighter or (public servant). I can understand that with my new label that I wouldn't be trusted around kids teaching fire safety at school, but why could I not continue to risk my life for the help and benefit of others as an on call wildland firefighter? Or as a firefighter period we are a team and never alone in any situation.
    In addition the article points out that, "how can one be rehibilitated if one cannot get a job". Even if there is no way that I can serve as an EMT or Firefighter it shouldn't mean that I cannot find a job to be able to provide for my new wife and stepson who love me and make me feel worthy of going on in life. We should all be careful how hard we judge others, the label they wear now my not be the person who they are now. People CAN learn and CHANGE from their mistakes and try to straighten out their lives. They should be judged on what they are doing to make it right.
    While I may not be able to teach any Rookies in a classroom, I may have one more lesson. Becareful what you do in your off time and how you handle your lives. That one small mistake may cost you from being able to do the job that you love, for the rest of your life.
    So now I remain, Longing to see you at a Combat Challenge and show you 43 isn't old.
    Last edited by fire-medic-james; 02-03-2010 at 03:01 AM.

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    Let me start off by saying I have had more than a few run ins with the law, and based on a few misdemeanor convictions going back over 12 years now, I won't be getting paid any time soon to fight fires. Is it fair, well obviously to me no, but alas it is how things are and I've made peace with that reality........... But as you can well imagine I do have an opinion on this suject.

    While it is true that as firefighers we are expected to have and maintain a certain level of propriety, people make mistakes...especially young people. How long should one's past be held against them? The nature of the conviction is of course of vital importance. Sexual or violent convictions do carry with them a certain stigma and may indeed speak to an individual's mental stability. But other convictions can be considered a matter of circumstance and that should be taken into consideration. Another factor when looking into a candidates past criminal convictions is how long has it been since the conviction and how has the person lived since. In other words should a conviction that happned 5, 10 or 15 years ago preclude a person from employment if they haven't had an issue since? At what point is a person considered "rehabilitated"? Most repeat offenders repeat within a relatively short time, so for me I would say 10 years of "clean living" out of jail is a fair timeframe.

    Whenever a person is hired for any job it is a roll of the dice. 99 times out of 100 the roll is a good one, but we all know that there are "bad apples" that make it through that never had a criminal issue...some of whom may even be your friends. There are plenty of alcoholics, drug addicts and dealers, perverts, thieves and other sordid characters that have held this job, and some that still do thanks to a crack legal team and union representation. Are these people somehow better than a person convicted of a crime 10 years ago who has had no trouble since? No, just luckier I think.

    There is much more to this of course, for it is not that cut and dry, but I will use myself as an example and leave you with this.
    Many people are quick to judge and that is their right, but remember I went before a judge, the person whose job it is to examine the facts and make a ruling based on those facts, already. He decided what was the proper "punishment to fit the crime" and I met the terms of that decision. Having done so I paid my "debt to society" in full...end of story. So it would seem have these two candidates. If that is indeed the case then they should be allowed to continue through the process and ultimately serve the community if they scored well enough to do so.

    Just my $.02
    Last edited by FFPCogs08; 02-03-2010 at 07:23 AM.

  7. #7
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    Post specific to Bridgeport.

    Minority city firefighters groups also support Valderrama and King.
    Therein lies the entire problem.

    Ghetto culture sees no problem with this type of criminal behavior.

    "Should you be denied employment opportunities for the rest of the rest of your life [because of a felony conviction]?"
    Absolutely not.

    But being a public servant is, in most cases a position of trust. Serving in that capacity is a privilege. You should have some consequences for your action. In NJ, a felony conviction, in almost every case, disqualifies you from being a public servant.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fire-medic-james View Post
    I'm sitting here trying to find information about still being a firefighter while having a felony conviction.
    Back in '99 I got married. During the courtship everything was great. Soon after the marriage things turned south and over time she became very verbally abusive. We decided that I would close my company, where I was gone much of the time but made a great income, to be near home now that we had our first son. I joined a volunteer fire department, got my EMT-B and went through the local Fire Academy. In two years I was one of the most trained and certified firefighters in the department, since the academy couldn't be done by everyone and most had suffered the long term of catching night classes as they could. My marriage at that point was terrible, there was no affection, no acceptance, and growing anamosity for me. In addition I was now brining home very little money comparred to her 85k. I reached a point after counceling, pastors, and seminars that I had to send a message that the marriage wasn't going to work as it was. I chose to separate from her and get some space between us. I still saw my boys at that time but nothing changed between us. I was doing much better at the fire department, my supervisors taking an interest in me and grooming me to become a lieutenant and take my new knowlege and teach new subordinates and rookies. after a year passed we decided to go for divorce (her dicision). Shortly after hiring an attorney and us starting to argue over her wanting to move three hours away and me not wanting to be an (every other weekend daddy), all communication ceased. Then, at the advisement of her attorney they opened a case against me for child porn. She knew that I was looking at internet porn while we were still together, but now separated and doing so well at the fire department, I had a new direction and drive in my life. I was taken into custody, my computer seized and was immediatly fired from the Fire Department and the EMS ambulance service that I worked at. The local News aired a story on "The local firefighter arrested who confessed to having sex with children as young as 5 years old". DSS got involved and and found no evidence of abuse but agreed that the viewing of porn was a risk. I went through evaluations, polygraph examinations, and Sex offender specific evaluations. All of which showed that I have never been interested in kids, pursued kids, had sex with anyone "underage", or have any hidden desires to enguage in sexual relations with those "underage". After a year and 3 months and recreating past history on my hard drive Porn was found to be on my computer during the time I stated and while I was still married living with her. The history also showed that as I continued looking at it, it grew to a level that would be classified as an addictive compulsive disorder. Now I have gone to court over 5 pictures that were in my deleted history and been charged with 5 counts of sexual exploitation of a minor. A sex crime on my record for 10 years and a felony for life. Since my separation I have not viewed porn, have no interest in it since I got out of that relationship. My Ex however got immediate full custody of my boys, the ability to move where ever she wants, and while the judge allows me to be around my boys, my Ex is now long gone and I have no way of finding them.
    As for the local News, I can't go after them for slander in reporting that I confessed to having sex with kids as young as 5, because they just claim they were reporting the information that the Sheriffs department gave them.
    The sheriffs dept. isn't liable because they were conducting an investigation to see if I was worse that what I was confessing to be, "looking at porn in my basement while in a poor marriage.
    The article above brings up an interesting question. If a person with a felony should be able to be a firefighter or (public servant). I can understand that with my new label that I wouldn't be trusted around kids teaching fire safety at school, but why could I not continue to risk my life for the help and benefit of others as an on call wildland firefighter? Or as a firefighter period we are a team and never alone in any situation.
    In addition the article points out that, "how can one be rehibilitated if one cannot get a job". Even if there is no way that I can serve as an EMT or Firefighter it shouldn't mean that I cannot find a job to be able to provide for my new wife and stepson who love me and make me feel worthy of going on in life. We should all be careful how hard we judge others, the label they wear now my not be the person who they are now. People CAN learn and CHANGE from their mistakes and try to straighten out their lives. They should be judged on what they are doing to make it right.
    While I may not be able to teach any Rookies in a classroom, I may have one more lesson. Becareful what you do in your off time and how you handle your lives. That one small mistake may cost you from being able to do the job that you love, for the rest of your life.
    So now I remain, Longing to see you at a Combat Challenge and show you 43 isn't old.
    Couple of thoughts...

    1. I am not sure if I understand you correctly. Are you saying that the Sheriff purposely put out a false story that was inflammatory about you to try to flush out additional witnesses or potential victims? If that is what happened, find another attorney. That is absolutely unethical and potentially illegal behavior.

    2. Nothing is ever deleted from a computer. Nothing. Ever.

    3. The most powerful person in the worls is a woman involved in a domestic dispute or a divorce. What she says is almost always accepted w/o question or verification. The man is guilty until proven innocent. When they are found to be lying (as they frequently are), they are rarely punished. Many women are legitimate victims, but the power that they yield in the legal system is incredible.

    4. I hope she rots in hell for using your kids against you. Don't give up trying to find them. It sounds like they would be better off with you in their life.
    PROUD, HONORED AND HUMBLED RECIPIENT OF THE PURPLE HYDRANT AWARD - 10/2007.

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    I once heard Alan Brunacini say that the fire department is the only branch of government that can go into a person's house in the middle of the night and cut the clothes off their grandchild without anyone asking a question.

    That occurs because of trust.

    When my engine company shows up, they don't see Michael, Adam & Travis... they see "THE FIRE DEPARTMENT." They trust the fire department. To maintain that, we need to hire people who are trustworthy. This means we can not be the place where convicted felons turn their life around.

    Do I think people deserve a second chance? Certainly. Do I think people can change and leave their troubled past behind? You bet. But I don't think the fire department is the place for that to happen. I think it's possible to find self-worth in thousands of other jobs that don't require the level of trust placed in the fire department.

    We can't trust someone convicted of any drug crime because we handle medications. We can't trust someone convicted or property crime because we are in strangers' houses every single shift. I don't want someone with a violent crime conviction on my shift because emergency scenes can get tense every now and then. We deal with children -- some in vulnerable situations -- so I'm out on people with a conviction for crimes against children.

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    Biggest problem is that the definition of a felony crime varies from state to state. Some states are more lenient than others.

    The other thing is, people make mistakes. Perfectly good people have been driven to do things they normally wouldn't simply because of the circumstances. Others have gotten in trouble just for being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Still more have been falsely convicted, the system isn't perfect. In fact one could be classified as a sex offender in one state and not another. For instance, in NY a person that is under the age of 17 cannot consent to sexual contact. So 17 year old has consensual sex with 16 year old. Instant sex offender. DWI laws are another area. Many many many people have stopped drinking altogether after getting a DWI. Believe it or not, many can and do correct their behavior. How about the fellow that is at a party and is provoked into a fight. During the fight he accidentally kills another or in a fit of rage doesn't stop in time. Gets a felony conviction for involuntary manslaughter. Wrong Place wrong time.

    Environment and social standing have a huge effect on how one lives and works in society. There is a lot of truth in the Movie Trading Places. There is no reason someone convicted of a felony should be automatically barred from employment. Given that most departments have minimum age requirements it is highly unlikely the worst criminals will be out in time to get the job. What we are left with are people who have served sentences of less than 10 or 20 years in some cases. We as a society can continue to kick these people or we can help them.



    Level 3 sex offenders should not be EMTs, but they could certainly be fire fighters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fire-medic-james View Post
    I'm sitting here trying to find information about still being a firefighter while having a felony conviction....
    Let me say that the science of forensic investigations is interesting to say the least. The issue here is that defense attorneys don't really understand what is going on. There can be things on your computer that you have no knowledge of. There was a recent botnet that stored child pornography on the victims computer. Numerous trojans, viruses, etc will infect the victim, open a back door, and then store stuff on the victim computer. There is something known as Alternate Data Streams in windows. Using this technique an attacker can hide files behind legitimate files. I have always questioned the ability of Law Enforcement to determine the age of a person in a picture. Without actually having the person their how old are they. And think of this. Porn Star Tracie Lords was actually 16 when she started doing porn films. I am sure there are millions of people in this country alone who have seen those performances. Are they guilty of possessing child pornography?

    I myself experienced a very inserting situation one time. I was looking at herbal remedies and questioning if they really help. In my research I stumbled upon a blog that touted the benefits and then offered a link for more information. Upon clicking the link I was taken to a Russian porn site. I believe that this site actually contained images of child pornography. This was about 10 years ago or more. After killing the numerous pop-ups and getting out of the site I though all was good. Little did I know they had changed my home page to go to their page. I cleaned that up only to find out the next day that they had also installed a script that ran on startup changing things back. At the time I didn't know much about temporary internet files or any of this stuff. The bottom line was I was doing something perfectly innocent and probably ended up with illegal stuff on the computer.

    Unfortunately, like it or not, in our society there is this assumption of guilt because you have been charged. And prosecutors, juries, and defense attorneys all by into it, either consciously or subconsciously. Since most lawyers are not tech savvy, I don't think many people get a fair trial on this stuff.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ScareCrow57 View Post
    Biggest problem is that the definition of a felony crime varies from state to state. Some states are more lenient than others.

    The other thing is, people make mistakes. Perfectly good people have been driven to do things they normally wouldn't simply because of the circumstances. Others have gotten in trouble just for being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Still more have been falsely convicted, the system isn't perfect. In fact one could be classified as a sex offender in one state and not another. For instance, in NY a person that is under the age of 17 cannot consent to sexual contact. So 17 year old has consensual sex with 16 year old. Instant sex offender. DWI laws are another area. Many many many people have stopped drinking altogether after getting a DWI. Believe it or not, many can and do correct their behavior. How about the fellow that is at a party and is provoked into a fight. During the fight he accidentally kills another or in a fit of rage doesn't stop in time. Gets a felony conviction for involuntary manslaughter. Wrong Place wrong time.

    Environment and social standing have a huge effect on how one lives and works in society. There is a lot of truth in the Movie Trading Places. There is no reason someone convicted of a felony should be automatically barred from employment. Given that most departments have minimum age requirements it is highly unlikely the worst criminals will be out in time to get the job. What we are left with are people who have served sentences of less than 10 or 20 years in some cases. We as a society can continue to kick these people or we can help them.



    Level 3 sex offenders should not be EMTs, but they could certainly be fire fighters.
    You have got to be kidding me.

    Does the company you "allegedly work" for hire personnel with felony convictions?
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainGonzo View Post
    You have got to be kidding me.

    Does the company you "allegedly work" for hire personnel with felony convictions?
    Has anyone ever been falsely convicted?

    1 strike I say we will give you a chance, 2 strikes and no way.

    One can even get a security clearance with a felony or criminal record

    ADJUDICATIVE GUIDELINES FOR DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY FOR ACCESS TO CLASSIFIED INFORMATION

    (a) The adjudicative process is an examination of a sufficient period of a person's life to make an affirmative determination that the person is an acceptable security risk. Eligibility for access to classified information is predicated upon the individual meeting these personnel security guidelines. The adjudication process is the careful weighing of a number of variables known as the whole-person concept. Available, reliable information about the person, past and present, favorable and unfavorable, should be considered in reaching a determination. In evaluating the relevance of an individual's conduct, the adjudicator should consider the following factors:

    (1) The nature, extent, and seriousness of the conduct;

    (2) the circumstances surrounding the conduct, to include knowledgeable participation;

    (3) the frequency and recency of the conduct;

    (4) the individual's age and maturity at the time of the conduct;

    (5) the extent to which participation is voluntary;

    (6) the presence or absence of rehabilitation and other permanent behavioral changes;

    (7) the motivation for the conduct;

    (8) the potential for pressure, coercion, exploitation, or duress; and

    (9) the likelihood of continuation or recurrence.

    (b) Each case must be judged on its own merits, and final determination remains the responsibility of the specific department or agency. Any doubt concerning personnel being considered for access to classified information will be resolved in favor of the national security.
    There is more though Read it and become educated one time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bfdladder5 View Post
    Lawyer: Can't bar felons from civil jobs

    By AARON LEO aleo@ctpost.com

    BRIDGEPORT

    State law bars municipalities from imposing a ban on hiring felons solely because of their criminal records, according to the lawyer for a city firefighter candidate with a felony conviction on his record.

    Two candidates for city firefighter have felony convictions.

    Earl King Jr. served several months in federal prison for bagging crack cocaine for the Peeler drug gang. Edward Valderrama has a felony conviction of an undisclosed nature. Valderrama declined comment on the advice of his lawyer.

    King is ranked 16th on the city's firefighter hiring list, and Valderrama is ranked 91st. The Civil Service Commission placed them on the list despite a civil service guideline barring hiring of felons. The commission is reviewing its decision.

    The city has not hired new firefighters from the hiring list.

    In spite of the Civil Service Commission's informal guideline, the city itself does not specifically bar felons from civil service jobs.




    OTHER ARTICLES IN THIS SECTION
    8/13/2004
    - Sikorsky looking out of state
    - ON THE RIGHT TRACK
    - Salcedo ouster deepens split; official resigns
    - N.J. governor quits, admits to gay affair
    - Ringmaster assumes Barnum Fest role
    - Trumbull urged to move on pre-school
    - Pastor: Civil verdict not end of bias case
    - Rell releases money to hire ethics staffers
    - Rains flood vault at Bridgeport City Hall
    - 4 teens gorge in 1st pizza fritta eating contest
    - Stratford students focus on science at summer camp
    - Heist suspect denies role in criminal spree
    - 2nd suspect denies looting credit union
    - Target store said unlikely for Fairfield
    - State scholars picked as Fulbright winners
    - Parent's outrage leads library to pull novel for young adults




    King's lawyer, Susan Wallace, said the commission is trying to remove her client from the list based only on his conviction, in violation of state discrimination laws. She spoke to a reporter at the commission's meeting Tuesday, while the panel was in closed session.

    The law allows employers to deny employment to convicted felons only after considering the type of crime and its relationship to the job requirements, as well as how long ago the conviction occurred and the degree of rehabilitation.

    The issue attracted the attentions of state Sen. Ernest E. Newton II and Rep. Charles D. Clemons Jr., both D-Bridgeport, who supported the candidates.

    "There's only one judge. We know who that is

    God," Clemons, a retired city firefighter, said before the meeting.

    Newton said, "You can't be rehabilitated if you can't get a job.

    "Should you be denied employment opportunities for the rest of the rest of your life [because of a felony conviction]?"

    Minority city firefighters groups also support Valderrama and King.

    But Fire Chief Michael Maglione said before the meeting that convicted felons cannot be trusted in the Fire Department.

    "There is a level of trust that is an essential part of the whole thing," he said. "Firefighters go into people's homes."

    He argued that even if the conviction occurred years ago and the candidates have not backslid, they "forfeited [their] opportunity to work in emergency public services."

    On Tuesday, the commission again reviewed Valderrama's case in closed session and tabled it until September's meeting.

    King's case, which the commission did not discuss Tuesday, will continue at October's meeting.

    A city councilman recently proposed an ordinance banning people with violent felony convictions from working in civil service jobs.

    Wallace called the term "convicted felon" misleading and stigmatizing.

    A felony is a charge

    not necessarily violent

    that carries a prison term of at least a year upon conviction, she said.

    Aaron Leo, who covers regional issues, can be reached at 330-6222.





    It does say, but I would guess this is Bridgeport CT???


    Not being a scholar of the laws in that state, I can't say.

    But in Virginia, you will not be hired if you have been convicted of a Felony and in some cases with a Misdemeanor convictions.

    The State of Virginia Dept. Of EMS will not certify anyone with either convictions so if you can't be certified by them, the fire service don't want you either.

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    Forum Member DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
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    Scarecrow... you didn't answer the question... you stepped around it like your namesake's dancing to "If I Only Had A Brain" from the Wizard of Oz and posted some stuff you either yahoo'd, googled or wikipedia'd.

    The question was...
    Does the company you "allegedly work" for hire personnel with felony convictions?
    Yes or no.. it isn't THAT hard...
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainGonzo View Post
    Scarecrow... you didn't answer the question... you stepped around it like your namesake's dancing to "If I Only Had A Brain" from the Wizard of Oz and posted some stuff you either yahoo'd, googled or wikipedia'd.

    The question was...


    Yes or no.. it isn't THAT hard...



    Its probably one of those Don't ask - Don't tell things!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainGonzo View Post
    Scarecrow... you didn't answer the question... you stepped around it like your namesake's dancing to "If I Only Had A Brain" from the Wizard of Oz and posted some stuff you either yahoo'd, googled or wikipedia'd.

    The question was...


    Yes or no.. it isn't THAT hard...
    I don't know, I don't work in personnel. I do know most job applications ask for criminal history and state this will not be an automatic disqualification.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonnee View Post
    Its probably one of those Don't ask - Don't tell things!!
    Actually NO. When going for a security clearance you need to tell all. I would also say that there is a higher level of trust needed for national security than there is for fighting fires.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ScareCrow57 View Post
    Level 3 sex offenders should not be EMTs, but they could certainly be fire fighters.
    At the risk of being banned, you are a D I P S H I T. I could only hope that a level 3 sex offender gets a hold of you one day.

    Unfortunantely Memphis is having more than its fair share of this very kind of thing on the local media the past couple of weeks. Seems a felony doesn't disqualify you here either, but it should.
    RK
    cell #901-494-9437

    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ScareCrow57 View Post
    I don't know, I don't work in personnel. I do know most job applications ask for criminal history and state this will not be an automatic disqualification.
    Nice try to skate around the question...
    Last edited by CaptainGonzo; 02-04-2010 at 06:46 AM. Reason: spelling correction.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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