1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    44

    Unhappy EMT-B Class help

    I just started my EMT-B class and Firefighter 2 class last week and so far so good (only two classes so far). The Firefighter 2 one doesn't look like it will be too much of a problem because I have a decent foundation of the basic information for our explorer post. But I was wondering what method you found best for studying/learning the EMT material? Some of it isn't bad, but anatomy and the human body area seems to have almost an overwhelming amount of stuff to learn. Any tips on this? I've started making some flash cards, but I will be here forever trying to make them. We are going to have to take the National test which I understand is a little harder. I just want to make sure I actually learn and retain the stuff without falling behind, so I will be ready for class tests and the national test and when I hopefully get out in the field.

    Thanks for any advice!

  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    326

    Default

    I went through my EMT-B class last year. Started the class end of June and went half way through Decemember (with a month break between, long story). I didn't take my NR exam until end of March 2004. I did not use any fancy cards or even study with any friends. What I did was pay attention in class the best I could, and I would read each chapter when the reading is assigned, and then re-read the chapter(s) to prepare for the chapter tests. Plus I re-read the entire book to prepare for the final exam. And then in about a one month time span in Feb-March 04 I read the entire book again, to prepare for the NR. So basically I read the book about 4 times, sometimes reviewing the more important things if I was having trouble with it. I'm sure some people can only read the book once and pass, but I forget stuff easly over time. My advice to you is make sure you do the assigned reading, and use your test scores to see how you are doing. If your scores arn't in the 90s, study harder for the next one. And at the end of the class re-read most of the stuff if you feel you may have forgotten some of it. BTW, the class really isn't that difficult. Good luck.

  3. #3
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    63

    Default read....and also....READ

    i just passed the practial about a week ago...i would say the best way to study for the written which i am studying for would have to be to read.. and read some more...my class was a wopping 3 weeks long...mon-fri 9-5 for three weeks..that was quite tough but anyways i got through it and im halfway there...if u want some help getting ready for the practical... IM me on aol if u have it JCA1386

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    80

    Default

    Don't get too down on that chapter of the human anatomy. Use it as a reference going back to it through out the class, you will need to know some of where the major organs are and what quadrants consist of but dont get too worked up about it at this point. The NR exam focuses on the ABC's and how well you know them not on how much you know your anatomy. Good Luck.

  5. #5
    Forum Member
    Jesika's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    52

    Default Not sure what book you use

    Bur we used this book and I am pretty sure you might be able to find your book on here also. If not this will still help you out. Click on the book and then there is a drop down menu that lists the chapters. And from there you can take mulitple choice tests or true false tets.


    http://www.prenhall.com/mistovich/
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting that vote." -Benjamin franklin

    "There is nothing wrong with America that can not be cured with what is right with America" -Henry Clay

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    326

    Default Re: read....and also....READ

    Originally posted by E7T1Stick
    i just passed the practial about a week ago...i would say the best way to study for the written which i am studying for would have to be to read.. and read some more...my class was a wopping 3 weeks long...mon-fri 9-5 for three weeks..that was quite tough but anyways i got through it and im halfway there...if u want some help getting ready for the practical... IM me on aol if u have it JCA1386
    How can you complete your EMT-B in a little over 100 hours? I thought the class was required to be around 250 hours?

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber
    EFD840's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Eclectic (no, NOT electric), Alabama
    Posts
    1,510

    Default Re: Re: read....and also....READ

    Originally posted by erics99


    How can you complete your EMT-B in a little over 100 hours? I thought the class was required to be around 250 hours?
    Different states or maybe just different programs. My program was 132 classroom hours plus ER and ambulance rotations. Total hours were just under 200.

    To the original poster, read and practice! Get a partner and practice those skills until you can do them in your sleep.

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber
    E229Lt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    2,987

    Default

    The toe bone's connected to the, Foot bone, the foot bone's connected to the.......Oh Forget it!

  9. #9
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Ashford, CT, USA
    Posts
    49

    Default

    My advice is to do whatever you normally do to help you remember things. If making flash cards helps you, that's great, but I know a lot of people who made flash cards who didn't pass the NR test. Don't get too caught up in the details of anatomy and numbers. A lot of people spend way too much time memorizing all kinds of little details during their EMT class, and find that the NR test is a lot broader in scope. Those "Pass the NR Test!" books aren't much help. They also seem to focus on the details much more than the NR test does. As long as you know the biggies you'll do fine.

    As far as the test goes, as another poster said, always keep it simple, and remember your ABCs. The test questions are poorly written, and misleading in a lot of cases. In a trauma situation, for example, they'll steer you towards wanting to stabilize a neck injury first, but you really want to ensure an open airway before you do that. No sense in having a stable c-spine if the patient has suffocated.

    In many people I've talked to, with different instructors (including myself) you don't feel like you've learned anything during your class. I was terrified going into the test. Then you suddenly realize that those 250 hours of repetitive instruction has sunk in, and you actually know the material better than you thought.

    So yeah. Don't get freaked out by the test, don't sweat the small stuff, and remember your ABCs above all else.

    Andy
    Last edited by Rittner; 08-30-2004 at 01:58 PM.

  10. #10
    Forum Member
    kghemtp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    726

    Default

    The drinkin' bone's connected to the party bone
    The party bone's connected to the stayin' out all night long
    And she won't think it's funny
    And I'll wind up all alone
    And the lonely bone's connected to the drinkin' bone
    -Tracy Byrd-


    For the class, try not to worry too much. As others have said, the tests will indicate some strengths & weaknesses, but the whole class time will pull things together. If at all possible, try to immediately take what you have learned & talked about in class, and apply it in a department, even if it's just talking things over with senior members. It seems the practical application of things is what helps a lot of people. If you can go into the test having developed some common sense about situations, you can reason things out (my girlfriend spoke about having to prioritize situations involving patients of different age groups & emergencies, but she had no practical experience to think about these things).

    How do you learn other things from past classes (ie high school)? Sure, this is a technical field but we're talking about needing to learn textbook stuff. What has worked for you? Sometimes reading, highlighting, rereading, rewriting notes from class, or various other things work for people. Oddly, I found that minimal notetaking worked well for me. I read the chapter(s) for that particular class lesson (and highlighted), listened & participated without much notetaking, and then reread the chapters applying all the little tidbits offered in the class. It made sense to me. Best of luck with all of this, and always let us know if we can help in any way. Take care!
    ~Kevin
    Firefighter/Paramedic
    --^v--^v--^v--^v--
    Of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong
    Dennis Miller

  11. #11
    MembersZone Subscriber
    sbfdco1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    ><(((*>
    Posts
    556

    Default

    Seeing that different techniques work for different people, you defintelty need to find what works best for you.

    When I took the class I would read the necessary chapters before and highlight as I go. Then I would take as many note as I could, for me, I needed to write it out. After the lecture we would have a quiz on these reading assignements. Luckly enough we were able to take the quiz sheet home. All in all, reading, highlighting, and taking notes got me through. When it came time to study for the exam at the end I had my notes, the higlight text and the old quizes/mid-term.

    Try and find a study partner as well.

    Good Luck.
    Jim
    Firefighter/EMT
    IACOJ
    ftm-ptb-rfb-egh-ktf-dtrt!

    September 11, 2001 - NEVER FORGET!

    BETTER TO DIE ON YOUR FEET THAN LIVE ON YOUR KNEES!

  12. #12
    MembersZone Subscriber
    N2DFire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    S.W. Virginia
    Posts
    1,286

    Default

    So many questions here.

    1) How to study
    That's going to depend on you. The method(s) that work best to help you learn / memorize things may not work well for me or the next person. I typically read a chapter/section/ whatever all the way through. Then go back and look at the objectives (DOT requirments) for the section, then go back and highlight the parts that explain & reinforce those objectives.

    The highlighted material is what I will re-read when I am reviewing that section. Flash cards & the like never did much for me.

    2) What to study
    Per the NREMT themselves:
    Evaluation of the current versions of the NREMT-Basic written examination indicates EMT-Basic students are having significant difficulty in identifying and managing airway, oxygenation, and/or ventilation problems in pediatric and adult patients.
    http://www.nremt.org/about/article_0..._potential.asp

    Airway - Airway - Airway can't stress that enough.

    BTW - if you read the entire article, this was discovered over 2 years ago and REMAINS a problem - study the airway section!!

    If your finances allow - get the NREMT Self Assesment Exam
    http://www.nremt.org/EMTServices/sho...Type&dups=cand
    (Scroll down)

    This sample test booklet is derived from the same question bank as the actual tests and will some with an answer guide that will tell you WHY the given answer is the correct one (very important).

    3) When to study (and when not to).
    First remember that the brain can only absorbe what the butt can endure. That means study in several small sessions rather than sitting for hours on end. Give your brain time to digest what you've just covered before trying to cram something new in there.

    Second - DO NOT (let me repeat that DO NOT) even think about studying within a day or so of the test. If you haven't learned it by now, you will not learn it in the next 24-48 hours and odds are you'll end up forgetting other stuff you knew as well.
    Additionally it will (hopefully) take some of the stress off so you can approach the test relaxed and ready to go.

    Best of luck with your program. Feel free to drop back in with any other questions you may have.

    erics99 - EFD840 is correct. Different states have different program requirments. In VA the [b]minimum] for EMT-B is 110 class hours and 10 hours of clinical time. The individual course coordinator, instructor and/or OMD have the discretion to add to that as much as they see fit provided they make the required minimum hours.
    Take Care - Stay Safe - God Bless
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic
    Instructor

  13. #13
    MembersZone Subscriber
    ff7134's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,093

    Default

    I have found studing anatomy helps if you have willing participant to practice with.....
    AKA: Mr. Whoo-Whoo

    IAFF Local 3900

    IACOJ-The Crusty Glow Worm

    ENGINE 302 - The Fire Rats

    F.A.N.T.A.M FOOLS FTM-PTB

  14. #14
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Ashford, CT, USA
    Posts
    49

    Default

    Originally posted by N2DFire
    [If your finances allow - get the NREMT Self Assesment Exam
    http://www.nremt.org/EMTServices/sho...Type&dups=cand
    (Scroll down)

    This sample test booklet is derived from the same question bank as the actual tests and will some with an answer guide that will tell you WHY the given answer is the correct one (very important).
    That's a big thing my instructor did that helped us out a lot, in the long run. Rather than focusing on rote memorization of facts and anatomy, she focused a lot on why an answer to a question was right or wrong. That way, you're better prepared for unknown situations (and real life EMT work) than you are if you just memorize flash cards. That way you can rationalize your way through a question or situation, rather than thinking "Crap! I didn't have a flash card for this!" If your class has quizzes, find an instructor or another EMT and go over your wrong answers. Don't just insert the correct answer into your brain, have them explain why the answer was wrong, and the process leading to the correct one.

    Books like "EMT BASIC EXAM 2E" (available all over the place) explain their test answers in pretty decent detail.

    Of course, this worked for me, and people learn in different ways. But give it a try if it sounds like something that will work for you.

    Andy

  15. #15
    Forum Member
    kghemtp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    726

    Default

    Hey Whoo-whoo....

    Yeah, that works pretty well sometimes. Just be sure to tell this willing participant (hopefully spouse or S.O.) that normal patients don't get what normally happens AFTER this A&P study session!

    "Yes, we give everyone a gynecological exam - Nothing is overlooked!"
    ~Kevin
    Firefighter/Paramedic
    --^v--^v--^v--^v--
    Of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong
    Dennis Miller

  16. #16
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    44

    Default

    Thanks everyone for all the replys and advice. I just used notecards to get the basic directional terms down, which worked well, but that's all I think I will use them for. Other than that I've just been reading what we will be doing in class and doing the workbook activities which kind of help show me what to focus on. So for now I'll keep reading, rereading, listening and doing the bookwork. The stuff about the human body was kind of my fault getting worked up over, I assumed we would need to know all of the really detailed terms, but our instructor has been going over which ones we really need to know, which luckily is considerably less than what's listed in the book. Overall so far so good

    Thanks again!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register