1. #1
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    Default Ideas on inventory and daily checks

    Hello this my first post and I am a newbie to this forum.
    I was just wondering if anyone had any good ideas on inventory issuses with daily checks on the trucks and maint. also. I am a driver/engineer in a small department in Alabama. We are constantly trying to find new ways of bettering our daily check sheets and basic inventory with all the equipment on the trucks . Any ideas would greatly be appreciated
    Thanks
    M Daniel
    Madison Fire and Rescue
    Last edited by mad251; 09-23-2004 at 02:47 AM.

  2. #2
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    Default

    Label the compartment door with the contents of the compartment. On your daily check you can reference the label. Also have a spot for everything, just throwing a bunch of things in a compartment is unprofessional and delays their use at an incident.

  3. #3
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    Smile

    Every Driver/Engineer should be totally familiar with every piece of equipment carried on their apparatus, where it is stored, and make sure it is back in it's place after a call or drill. Nothing is as frustrating as going to do your daily check list and finding something missing or finding something where is shouldn't be.

    I've found that the biggest problem is usually one or two people who either aren't familiar with the way you have thing set up or just don't care where they put things.

    Maybe we need to threaten the people who grab an axe, or nozzle, or adaptor, that if it isn't returned to where they got it when they're through with it, you intend to break some fingers !

  4. #4
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    It may seem obvious, but one of the reasons for the apparatus inventory check is to make sure nothing is missing. But what do you do if something IS missing? Make sure you have a procedure to follow in this case that either ensures that the missing equipment is located or replaced AND that all the crews who might be assigned to the unit know the equipment status BEFORE they get toned out.

    Like I said, it seems obvious, but I know of cases whare engineers on all three shifts have dutifully checked their equipment and noted something was missing on the checksheet for a week before anyone asked about locating or replacing the missing equipment.
    ullrichk
    a.k.a.
    perfesser

    a ship in a harbor is safe. . . but that's not what ships are for

  5. #5
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    Default checkouts...

    We have computer generated checkouts that we pull up from a shared cabinet. Unfortunately, these are typically not kept up to date with new or recently added equiptment (especially if your rig is ALS). Hopefully, you are not bouncing around (as I do) from truck to truck every other shift.
    I like to take the standard weekly checkout update it that day with all the equipment I find on that truck. When the inventory is complete, I copy it, and send it to the regular drivers on each shift. This does a couple things. One, it shows you are proactive. Two, it shows you actually DID the checkout, and didn't just pencil-whip it. Three, it keeps everybody on the same page concerning what is and isn't on the trucks.
    We have checkout binders that have separate section as follows:
    1) Equip. Lost and Damaged
    2) Repair Requests
    3) Inventory
    4) Vehicle Registration/Accident Info
    5) Completed P+M (done by the garage)

    This works great for us. If something is supposed to be there and is not, it should be written up. If it ain't there I write it up! It tells when the truck was fixed, when it was damaged, etc. You may want to try it out!
    - Fortes Fortuna Juvat -

  6. #6
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    We use truck check sheets before each shift. They include checking all running lights, air pressure, fuel level, switching to and running the pump, setting the pressure relieve valve, SCBA testing, compartment contents, running power eqp, and checking EMS kit. Like mentioned above it's very important to know what's going on with your rig. We use a black board in the bay to mark any missing items or issues that might be going on with the trucks. I really like the above type of record keeping. More information the better. Our truck check sheets must be turned into the Station Captain each shift. This makes you accountable for not doing the "pencil whip." Any missing or broken eqp should also be written up immediately and notified to all personal. Accountability is the key.
    Proud Volunteer Firefighter!

  7. #7
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    Wink

    Make sure you check your intake valves and exercise them on a regular basis. Our valves are pneumatic on our backup engine and they siezed up on us from lack of use and we ended up spending money we shouldn't have had to to get them operating again. We now do this on a daily basis. Also, I make it a point to climb up and do a visual inspection of the water level in the booster tank from the tank fill located in the front left corner of hose bed.

  8. #8
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    Default Daily and Weekly checks

    We use daily and weekly check sheets incorporapted into the same workbook. Workbooks are kept in each apparatus. Our daily checks include all the basics such as; fuel, oil, coolant, etc.. As well as operating and setting the discharge relief valve. All the valve handles are exercised daily and lubricated weekly. We operate the intake relief valve and backflush the pump weekly. All of our checks are in compliance with the requirements of NFPA 1002. We attach a work order with each workbook so when a problem is found, it is written down and passed on to the Company Officer to schedule for repair. At the end of the month our check sheets are forwarded to administration for record keeping and history tracking of the apparatus. A step-by-step worksheet is also incorporated into our maintenance program for weekly, semi-annual, and annual maintenance to keep everybody on the same page.

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