1. #1
    Junior Member

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    Default Inital Rescue Diver training??

    Question to you firefighters who have training and experience with Dive Rescue Teams. How does a person who is interested in Dive Rescue go from nothing to Rescue Diver? Obviously there is intial training to be certified as a regular diver. But from there, where would someone go to get training as a rescue diver? Also, in your dept's is there a difference between a "rescue swimmer" and a "rescue diver"? Our dept is beginning to train all members to the Awareness level of water operations. Lots of imput and detail would be helpful. Thanks to all and stay safe.

  2. #2
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    Default dive training

    vaFFPM,
    Are you presently a certified diver? if not that would be your first step. Depending were your located you should be able to find a Basic Open water class from NAUI, or PADI, which are the most common. You can get information on these from your local dive shop. So ya want to be a rescue diver huh, the first thing is to get your self some underwater time, like firefighting, know the ins and outs of all your equipment, how to put in on and off, adjust it, with your eyes closed. then be able to do the same with your dive buddy. If you live in the northeast be aware that you will be diving in "black water" visibilty 0-5' if your lucky. At this point you should look to some advanced training. My suggestion would be to contact Dive Rescue International, and take a Rescue Diver course from an agency like theirs. www.diverescueintl.com .I would not waste my time with a PADI, or Naui , go to a company that trains PUBLIC SAFETY DIVERS. That should get you started in the right direction. As to rescue swimmers, we dont use them per say, we use divers without gear,that is a BCD and tank, but we still use a harness, rope,fins and a helmet. We use divers because they are generally more comfortable in the water. Dont forget those surface support personal, without those line tenders your DEAD. Take it slow, dont rush, you will be a better diver. After all when firefighters need help they call us, nobody left for us to call.
    There is more information at www.public safety diver.com

    Stay Safe, hope this helps get you started in the right direction.
    Last edited by aarel20; 09-11-2004 at 11:34 PM.

  3. #3
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    Default

    Open water is the first step but that is far from being a PSD. If you are starting a team for your department you are in for a lot of work, but it will be worth it. While you are getting the initial training set up some sop's on surface rescue and other basic reach, throw, row, type of scenarios.
    While you are getting some experience take dry suit, learn to use a full face mask like the AGA or EXO, take an ice diving class, and work towards advanced open water. This will not happen overnight but you'll get there. Good PSD classes are taught by Dive Rescue, and Lifeguard systems. They unfortunatly are polar opposites so don't take one as the bible over the other. Both work and both have advantages and disadvantages.

    Any other questions feel free to post, good luck.

  4. #4
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    Key Largo, FL
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    Default

    The only thing I would add is Dive-Rescue Inc. has brochures about starting a team and some of the things needed.
    In Key Largo we do not have rescue swimmers. We do have Rescue Snorkelers. No one goes near the shore line, in a boat or in the water without an appropiate PFD or BCD.(Including the Chief
    "Don't say much so when I do.."

    9/11 This Firefighter will never forget!

  5. #5
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    Crowley, LA
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    Talking Dive Rescue

    Chief,

    An earlier post stated to forget the recreational agencies and jump right to Dive Rescue Intl. I have been trained by them, and they are a top shelf training agency, but do not discount initial training by a REC agency. Now, to start off, I am NOT an instructor for an agency so I have no hidden agenda. Before a person jumps into Dive rescue, they should be very comfortable with diving and all the equipment that this involves. I would highly recommend a training level at least to Recreational Rescue Diver before becoming a Public Safety Diver. The REC rescue course is designed to get the student prepared to handle a diver emergency either to himself or his dive buddy. If you can do this, then you should by now be very comfortable underwater. All of our dives in So. Louisiana are in black water, or mud. Having numerous rec. dives got our guys comfortable with the equipment prior to the blackwater. Remember, safety sometimes means crawling before running.
    Craig Walker

    Union Strong...Union Proud

    An Irishman is the only person in the world who would walk over 12 naked women to get to a bottle of Stout.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Dive Rescue

    Originally posted by Firediver
    Chief,

    An earlier post stated to forget the recreational agencies and jump right to Dive Rescue Intl. I have been trained by them, and they are a top shelf training agency, but do not discount initial training by a REC agency. Now, to start off, I am NOT an instructor for an agency so I have no hidden agenda. Before a person jumps into Dive rescue, they should be very comfortable with diving and all the equipment that this involves. I would highly recommend a training level at least to Recreational Rescue Diver before becoming a Public Safety Diver. The REC rescue course is designed to get the student prepared to handle a diver emergency either to himself or his dive buddy. If you can do this, then you should by now be very comfortable underwater. All of our dives in So. Louisiana are in black water, or mud. Having numerous rec. dives got our guys comfortable with the equipment prior to the blackwater. Remember, safety sometimes means crawling before running.
    I must say that as a PADI MSDT (Master Scuba Diver Trainer) myself, that the above is some sound advice. I'm not saying that you should run right out and sign up for the next availble PADI class (for we all know what the true meaning of PADI is (Put Another Doller In)), no I agree with what Fire Diver stated.

    That the classes will give you more experience in the water and make you much more comfortable down the road. Of the Students that I've taught, the Rescue Class is the one I engrain into them from the get go. I tell them that as they continue on in their diving carrers, no mater if they are a Divemaster or Instructor, you will ALWAYS be a Rescue Diver.
    It's Good Ta Be Da King !!!

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