Thread: Ride-outs

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    Default Ride-outs

    Hey I was just wondering how ur posts do ride outs for explorers...
    Such as how long you can do one, what type of training you need to recieve first, stuff like that...

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    I can make this simple but I will put up the complicated version.

    -Cadets in my department are NOT allowed to ride the rig to a call under any circumstances from the stations.
    -Cadets Are REQUIRED to ride the rig if they are out training and that rig/company is called to respond since they cannot be left alone somewhere. They will have to stand aside and do nothing at call though.
    -Cadets ARE allowed to go to the station and hang out there during a call.
    -Cadets ARE allowed to ride the rigs/apparatus for any trainings, parades, or events.

    Any Questions?

    Mike
    Mike
    Levittown, NY
    Cadet Corps Member
    1st Lieutenant

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    I feel bad for you...

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    I feel bad for you...
    We're there to learn.

    Riding DOES NOT EQUAL learning.

    Period. It's an extra "advantage" in most cases. I learned alot more taking class and doing training before I started riding, then I have at any scene.

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    your right, but i Have also learned alot about things on calls too, because what you lern in the classroom is onething, what you lern on the streets is another...

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    your right, but i Have also learned alot about things on calls too, because what you lern in the classroom is onething, what you lern on the streets is another...

    Please take the nearest entrance into a school building and re-enter the classroom.

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    I'll post about this tomorrow, after I talk to the chief on the way into school. Might be starting an internship for this school year.
    -Bozz

    Air Force Medic

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    What I have learned with my post (combo of rides and training) has put me to the top of my classes so far. The person is right, in my mind life is 70%street smarts and 10%book knowledge. Also riding as an explorer lets you see if you can handle the mental aspects as well as some of the physical aspects.
    I am involved with 2 posts, a fire and a medical.
    On the fire post we attend 6months of mtg's (aprox 12 meetings)(while keeping atleast an 80% attendance record) then we are cleared by our advisor to ride. We are allowed to do most everything except for do interior work, climb a ladder (non-training), pack up (the only time we can pack on the fire ground is if the smoke gets too thick on the fire ground and the BC tells you to pack up), we can not operate any machinery (saws, extrication) while on calls. We are basicaly gophers, getting stuff, and helping with overhaul and rehab. We sometimes are put on an exterior defense line(2 1/2") when they need the extra water.

    As for the medical, we attend 6months of mtg's (aprox 12 meetings)(while keeping atleast an 80% attendance record) then we are cleared by our advisor to ride. We have a small test that covers unit orientation to basic vitals. We are basicaly the gophers, getting the med kits, carying stuff, operating the control pannel in the back (o2, lights etc...)

    What I have learned is totaly priceless to me. It has helped me in thousands of ways, in class and in life.

    I feel that it is better to find out if you dont like something in the role of an explorer, that is what exploring is, career exploration.

    It is my opinion riding out with the crews is some of the best training that you can recieve, but I do understand where the departments are comming from with the liabilty issue, I know firsthand how much the insurance costs to add explorers to the coverage. Plus I allways thought that BSA (for explorers) had insurance coverage that included while riding with emer apparatuses. Ill go to my local bsa office and get more info and post it later.
    FF I
    FF II
    Hazmat Operations
    EMT-B
    ---------------------------------------------------

    The light at the end of the tunnel has been temporarly shut off due to the current work load. The Mangement

    When all else fails USE DUCT-TAPE!!!

    My views posted in this fourm are my personal views only and do not reflect on any agencies that I am afiliated with.

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    We are not allowed to respond on runs or go to the station.

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    Originally posted by ffexpCP
    We are not allowed to respond on runs or go to the station.
    So what do you learn ???

    The purpose of any Explorer, Junior, or Cadet Program is to orientate our young people into the Fire-Service. - Classroom Training is vital and field training is important to. Limitations and rules need to be enforced which with exception of entering burning buildings and operating hydrolic tools the same rules apply to senior guys. - My company treats the Juniors as members because that's what they are ...Members in a diffrent classification. They Ride out on calls {if there are seats} recieve turn-out gear and a locker, carry a pager, and attend calls, drills, and meetings as any other member. We don't allow them to operate power tools or go into burning structures - You learn by doing...Our Juniors do...And they learn.

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    in my mind life is 70%street smarts and 10%book knowledge
    Umm, maybe I'm missing something here, but what happened to the other 20%?
    *Old FH Forum SN: WFDjr1*

    IACOJ
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    Frankly our trucks never have a full cab and I personally believe that if a cadet is there at the station or there before the truck leaves he should be able to ride so he can at LEAST watch and learn some stuff and maybe do some exterior work.
    Mike
    Levittown, NY
    Cadet Corps Member
    1st Lieutenant

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    Thanks for catching that, it is 70%street smarts and 30% book knowledge, my first responder professor said that it was 80/20. It was the end of a long day when I posted that, I guess the other 20% was kidnapped by my extreeme sleep deprevation.
    FF I
    FF II
    Hazmat Operations
    EMT-B
    ---------------------------------------------------

    The light at the end of the tunnel has been temporarly shut off due to the current work load. The Mangement

    When all else fails USE DUCT-TAPE!!!

    My views posted in this fourm are my personal views only and do not reflect on any agencies that I am afiliated with.

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    Alright so here is my deal. I am now an intern with my fire department. That means, if there is a call, I can go. Doesn't matter what time of day it is.
    -Bozz

    Air Force Medic

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    our explorers must be on the post for at least 90 days. in that time they have to learn all of the equipiment on all of our 13 trucks and pass a written test with at least 80%.

    once they have done all of that they are issiued gear.

    any time a call comes in (as long as it is in curfew) we can ride out on the truck. but if the truck holds 5 people and there are 4 ff on the truck with you and another ff comes to the station you have to give up your seat to the ff.

    once on scene we can do any thing a real ff can except: enter a burning structure, have direct pt. care, or opperate the jaws of life.

    our hours of opperation are:

    mon - thurs: 1400 - 2200 hrs
    fri: 1400 - 0000 hrs
    sat: 0500 - 0000 hrs
    sun: 0500 - 2200 hrs

    (all days off school work like the weekend)
    IF YOU FOLLOW ALL OF THE RULES YOU MISS ALL OF THE FUN.

    Moose (Post 2028 Vice President/ Command Officer)Explorer Highland Twp. Fire/Rescue Dept.

    Any Questions Contact Me At Moose20282@yahoo.com

    These Are My Opinions, Not that of My Dept. or Any other Orgnazition I Belong to.

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    Thumbs up My take

    I began my career in the fire service as an Explorer (more years ago than I care to admit). Now, I am the chief of a small joint fire & EMS district, and yes, we have an Explorer Post.

    When I was an Explorer, we were not permitted to ride along and basically didn't interact with firefighters much at all. In fact, our only connection to the fire department was that we met in the basement of one of the city's firehouses, and we did some emergency medical-related training and activities. None of our advisors were members of the department, but rather parents with a boy scouting background. Don't get me wrong, they were great, but not being more involved with the firefighters and not being allowed to ride-along was my only disappointment with the program. I feel the experience would have been far more valuable had we been able to ride along and interact with the firefighters. Still, just being in the firehouse once a week was enough to help me decide that the fire service was where I wanted to spend my professional life.

    Fast forward!

    Today, my department's Explorers are permitted to participate as members of our duty crews, and ride along on fires and medical emergencies. We have designed our own basic training program, and our Explorers participate with regular department members in regular inservice training. Our ride-along restrictions are pretty much the same as those that have already been posted by other contributers to the forum.

    My experience has caused me to conclude that a mix of both training AND experience make for a better youth program.

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    At my station this is how it goes...... Come to 3 Wed. night meetings, get a t-shirt, pick out a helmet and its time to ride.
    For the 1st few times that an explorer rides the firemen will keep them on the truck until the scene is under control, then they can come out. After a while they will get to know your strong and weak points. Right know when we get on a structure fire i will just jump off the truck as soon as the firemen do and i will help them pull hose(not for me to use it but for them)set up rehab w/ the paramedics change air bottles ect. Then after the fire is out a fireman will usually take me through and check it out. Only thing different between my post and many others is that a helmet is my entire turn-out gear. No coat pants boots. The boots i wear are the same ones they wear at the station. A vest gloves and helmet are our turn out gear. As a result of a fatality involving a fireman riding in an ambulance during transport, riding privilages have been temorarily withdrawn.
    Anything Goes!

    "I have no ambition in ths world but one, and that is to be a fireman. The position in the eyes of some, may appear to be a lowly one; but we know the work which a fireman has to do believe his is a noble calling. Our proudest moment is to save lives. Under the impulse of such thoughts, the nobility of the occupation thrills us, and stimulates us to do deeds of daring, even of supreme sacrafice." ---- Edward F. Crocker Cheif of Department FDNY 1899-1911

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    We're there to learn.

    Riding DOES NOT EQUAL learning.
    To 42VTExplorer,

    I don't understand how you can say that. Riding is learning. We are there to learn as much as possible. I am lucky enough to be in a post at a career deptartment and the men there understand that WE ARE THEIR FUTURE. In 10 years we are going to be taking their old spots as they move up the ranks to Lt. and Capt. I will tell you there is no better classroom than the truck and a Lt. or Senior man or even a Capt. actually showing you whats happening and after the run explaining and answering any questions. You should be ashamed for say riding does not equal learning. RIDING IS THE BEST LEARNING EXPERIENCE ANYONE can get. to give an example if you look at nearly every medium to large scale Career deptartment and look at their probies analyze this for a minute. A probie will go through about 6-8 weeks of probie school on average where they will learn the basics on everything from how to dress a hydrant to throwing a ladder. Then they are assigned a house where they get sh*t on for up to a year. And that there is where they actually learn all the tactics tricks and etc of the job while learning as a probie riding to calls. I feel sorry for you and the way you've been led down the wrong path. and some day you will understand that you learn from experience not just sitting in classrooms trust me i've done both and i will support the fact that you can learn the most on a truck with hands on experience.
    FTM-PTB/Leather Forever

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    Originally posted by N8sfd333


    You should be ashamed for say riding does not equal learning. RIDING IS THE BEST LEARNING EXPERIENCE ANYONE can get. to give an example if you look at nearly every medium to large scale Career deptartment and look at their probies analyze this for a minute. A probie will go through about 6-8 weeks of probie school on average where they will learn the basics on everything from how to dress a hydrant to throwing a ladder. Then they are assigned a house where they get sh*t on for up to a year. And that there is where they actually learn all the tactics tricks and etc of the job while learning as a probie riding to calls. I feel sorry for you and the way you've been led down the wrong path. and some day you will understand that you learn from experience not just sitting in classrooms trust me i've done both and i will support the fact that you can learn the most on a truck with hands on experience.


    i feel the same way. shure you can learn alot in the classroom but the s*** does not always work that way. in the classroom you have all of the supplies you need there. when you are on a scene you hane to work with what you got, you don't always have what you need so you have to get by whith what you have. there is also no harm in the classroom, when you are on a scene you have to keep checking to see if it is safe, and you are under alot of pressure because it is the real thing.

    you could pratice all you want but there is no feeling like when you have someones life in your hands. you cannot get that feeling in the classroom.
    IF YOU FOLLOW ALL OF THE RULES YOU MISS ALL OF THE FUN.

    Moose (Post 2028 Vice President/ Command Officer)Explorer Highland Twp. Fire/Rescue Dept.

    Any Questions Contact Me At Moose20282@yahoo.com

    These Are My Opinions, Not that of My Dept. or Any other Orgnazition I Belong to.

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    Riding DOES NOT EQUAL learning.
    WOW! How can you say that. I am now 18, I have been in my cadet post for 4 years now. And out of everything I have done RIDING, and going to calls is where I have learned the MOST. sure there were some times where I didn't know what was going on but thats when you go back to the station and talk to your officer or fellow firefighter that was on the truck with you. You then realize what and why those things were either used or happened. Sure there are some things you can only learn from a book or in a class. But I think riding has done a hell of a lot better for me than just reading a book. And I agree with the other guys that said this but I feel sorry for you because you can't ride. Thats pretty much the main reason that I go to the station. I go out on runs and then I come back and talk to the senior fire fighters and officers about what happened and they either tell me how to do what they did or they tell me the "Old School" way of doing those opperations. Which comes into some really helpfull and humorous story telling. "Back when I was a young scout like you...". So all I can say is... Riding DOES EQUAL learning!

    Cadet Lt. Thompson.
    Worthington FD.

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    Thanks for the props its soo true its such a different feeling.
    FTM-PTB/Leather Forever

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    Originally from N8sfd333 :
    You should be ashamed for say riding does not equal learning. RIDING IS THE BEST LEARNING EXPERIENCE ANYONE can get.
    I don't think it is. I'll agree with you that we can disagree, but that's about as far as it will go. I took the VT Firefighter one twice before I ever stepped off a piece of fire apparatus, I sat through an EMT B class before I really got my feet wet in EMS. I learned alot more in the classroom then I have on any fire call, or any ambulance run.

    I feel sorry for you and the way you've been led down the wrong path. and some day you will understand that you learn from experience not just sitting in classrooms trust me i've done both and i will support the fact that you can learn the most on a truck with hands on experience.
    I'm glad you think I've gone down the wrong path. You have the right to your opinion, and I have the right to mine. Once again, we both can agree to disagree. I haven't been lead down the wrong path, in my mind. I may learn a different way then every other cadet out there, who knows. I learn best if I am in the classroom, and not trying to pay attention to every detail on a scene.


    This originally from Moose2028
    I feel the same way. shure you can learn alot in the classroom but the s*** does not always work that way. in the classroom you have all of the supplies you need there. when you are on a scene you hane to work with what you got, you don't always have what you need so you have to get by whith what you have. there is also no harm in the classroom, when you are on a scene you have to keep checking to see if it is safe, and you are under alot of pressure because it is the real thing.

    you could pratice all you want but there is no feeling like when you have someones life in your hands. you cannot get that feeling in the classroom.
    I'd first like to point out the glaring grammatical and spelling errors in this quoted post. I'd also like to include the one before. I think you both might need some more time in an English classroom. Some spelling and grammar improvements will help you. Trust me on that. I also think that a cadet, junior, whatever you want to call it, should not be in a position where they are worrying about whether or not they are safe. You shouldn't be that close and or in an IDLH environment. They also should not be worrying about having someone's life in their hands.

    This from Cadet228
    And I agree with the other guys that said this but I feel sorry for you because you can't ride. Thats pretty much the main reason that I go to the station. I go out on runs and then I come back and talk to the senior fire fighters and officers about what happened and they either tell me how to do what they did or they tell me the "Old School" way of doing those opperations. Which comes into some really helpfull and humorous story telling. "Back when I was a young scout like you...". So all I can say is... Riding DOES EQUAL learning!
    Classroom time does not mean you're not gaining experience. But riding should not be a "primary" source. Classroom time is nothing unless reinforced with hands on training. Why do you think they have you do practicals during EMT, FR, FF classes? It's that "[I]hands on stuff[I]".

    No where above did I say that I could no t ride. I have the option of going to the station for a shift and riding if I want to. I choose to gain classroom experience, coupled with hands on training outside of a call. I'm recently certified as a FR, I've already racked up 6 hours of CEUs. That's in under 1 week. I have another 155 weeks or so to get the rest. I'll end up with over 400 CEU hours before I have to recertify. I've never seen a way for me to get CEU credit out on a call.

    Once again, I think we can all agree, to disagree.

    EDIT: Had to fix a few of the brackets for the quote commands.

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    Once you get your EMT-B and FF I/II your not an explorer anymore. There was a story on here a few months ago about an emt who quit. They were in the top 2% of their class, scored above 97% on all the test's, including the nremt and state tests. But when they got into the field, they had no clue what to do.

    You can take the most book smart emt or firefighter, but without hands on training and experience they will not know their arse hole from their mouth when the get on the scene.

    If you learn it earlier, you will have a much better chance of getting hired and a much better chance of exceling in the field.

    If you dont pay attention on scene LODD status could be right around the corner. Self safety is the number one job of any emergency worker. If you learn the ropes and skills earlier, when you actualy are put into a place where someones life is in your hands, you will not screw up.

    And everyone is right, we are all entitled to our own opinions.

    Practicals are nothing compared to an actual medical/fire call.
    FF I
    FF II
    Hazmat Operations
    EMT-B
    ---------------------------------------------------

    The light at the end of the tunnel has been temporarly shut off due to the current work load. The Mangement

    When all else fails USE DUCT-TAPE!!!

    My views posted in this fourm are my personal views only and do not reflect on any agencies that I am afiliated with.

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    Once you get your EMT-B and FF I/II your not an explorer anymore.
    I never said I got my EMT-B and my FF I. I only said I took the class. I never said I got a certification.

    Also, like I said above, junior members should not be put in a place where scene safety is an issue. I don't care how understaffed, how much we're needed, or how much we want to be up close and personal with the fire, it should not be allowed. This goes for EMS too. We should be there to watch, not participate in care. If you're certified as a FR, or EMT, maybe. But even then, as an Explorer that's entering some shakey grounds.

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    Default Ride-outs

    42VTExplorer,

    I am a career firefighter as well as the Explorer Advisor for my FD. I have strict rules as to what are Explorers are allowed to do on ride-outs. I do not allow any explorer to meet our crews on-scene. We have a sign-up sheet each time we meet to where all explorers, regardless of whether they just signed up or have been with us for 3-4years are allowed to sign up for ride-outs until our next meeting and then we do it again.

    The purpose of the Explorer program is not only to indoctrinate young people into the fire service but to also teach life lesson's. I have the belief that no amount of classroom training can take the place of of experiencing the vast difference of people and people's problems (life lessons) than on ride-outs.

    42VTExplorer, I am sure you have great intentions. I also find comfort in your passion for your ideas. That is certainly a positive trait. However, I would suggest that for the sake of your future career, happiness, and for the sake of truly making a difference in other people's lives, you adopt the following:

    1. You are not always right.

    2. The people that you work with should be more important to you then you are.

    3. Never build yourself up by tearing other people down.

    4. Your ultimate contribution will not be measured by what you think you gave but what others feel you gave.

    5. Be the type of person that doesn't have to argue your case because other people have so much trust and respect for you that they argue your case for you.

    I agree 100% with you; Book and classroom knowledge is extremely important. I am 36 years old and I still learn something new everyday. However, ultimately, we are in the people business. I might be able to apply a traction splint because I took a class on it as well as did it 100X in practicals. However, when you are applying a traction splint in real life because someone has fracture a femur, that splint and that femur is attached to someone that has opinions, ideas, dreams, and more than likely will be different then your own. Your success on that call will not just be measured on your traction splinting technique but in how you dealt with that person. My suggestion to you is for you to get out of the classroom occasionally and learn some of these life lessons.

    Best regards,
    Glenn

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