1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber

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    May 2004
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    5

    Default Need some testing advice.

    I am not sure if this is the right place for this msg, but I wanted to get maximum exposure. I am testing with Irvine FD in a few weeks, and need some typical math and mechanical questions that ya'll have seen on enterance exams. If you can also include a description of how to solve the problem, or tips I would appreciate it. I am doing everything I can to be prepared for the test so I can do what I trained for.

    Thanks to anyone who can help. -Moose
    Bryan "Moose"
    E641
    FireFighter
    NREMT-B
    HAZMAT

  2. #2
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    Aug 2002
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    San Francisco Bay Area
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    Default Written Test

    Having Trouble with the Written?

    "Luck is given to the prepared", Thomas Jefferson

    If you are having trouble passing the written test, try to find out what portion you are having problems with. Is it the math, mechanical, aptitude, or word comprehension? You don’t need to take a college course to get ready.

    Still the top program for getting ready for the written test is the Encyclopedia of Firefighter Examinations from www.Fireprep.com

    For the math or word comprehension, candidates tell us the Firefighter Entrance Hand Book is the best. For math, you only need to know about twelve formulas. Those formulas are in this book. Once you have the formulas down, you just plug in the numbers or convert the word math problems into the formula and you can't be fooled. Once you gorilla your way through the 279 pages, your score will be higher. One candidate told us it made his head hurt, but he got hired in Seattle. You can order it @ www.firecareers.com

    Of all the books out there for the mechanical aptitude, the ARCO Mech. Aptitude & Spatial Relations book will give you more than you will ever need. Perfect Firefighter has it @ www.firecareers.com

    Try this approach. Instead of taking the sample tests in the written test books cold, go to the answers in the back and go through the first time with the answers. Then you'll know what they are looking for in the answers. It will cut your learning time. There are only so many ways they can ask a question on the same topic. You will get to the point where you can look at a question and go right to the answer. It will become scary.

    Top Scoring Examination Strategies From www.Fireprep.com

    1. Read the directions very carefully and listen closely to the moderator or instructor if directions are given orally. If at any time you are unsure of any of the directions, raise your hand and a test monitor will come over and explain your question to you. Many types of these examinations differ from one section to the next. You should pay particular attention to the instructions for these types of examinations.

    2. Before you begin, make sure you have all the pages in the examination. In most examinations you will be told the number of pages in your booklet; check to make certain that you have all the pages or sections. If any page is missing, immediately raise your hand and inform the test monitor.

    3. Make sure that you are marking the right answer to the right question. All it takes is skipping one question and not skipping the corresponding number on the answer sheet, to cost you the examination. Every five questions or so, it is a good idea to take a look at the number in the test booklet and the number on your answer key to insure they match. Also pay strict attention to whether the answer key numbers are vertical or horizontal. You don't want to find out that you have been answering the questions on the wrong numbers.

    4. When marking your answers, make sure that you mark only one answer for each question. Do not make exceedingly large markings on your answer sheet; most of these examinations are graded by computer. If the marking is too close to another marking, it will be double keyed and you will lose credit for that question.

    5. If you need to erase an answer, be sure you erase it completely. Do not leave any shadows that could possibly show up when the computer is grading the examination.

    6. If you come across a question during the examination that you find difficult and you are spending too much time on it, skip over the question and leave a mark on your answer key. Do not mark in the area where you will be answering; mark to the left of the number so that you know to come back to this number. It is also a good idea, if you are allowed to mark in your test booklet, to mark out choices you have eliminated as being incorrect. This allows you, when you come back at the end of the test, to go back to only the choices remaining when you are seeking the best answer. If you come across a question on the examination that you find difficult, don't allow any more than two minutes on the question. If you don't know the answer, mark it, skip it, and return to it after you have completed the remainder of the test.

    7. Check the time during the examination. For example, if there is a 200-question test and a three-hour time limit, you should be on question 100 with 1-1/2 hours left. You should check the remaining time every 10-15 minutes to ensure you are on an appropriate time frame.

    8. Do not change answers unless you are absolutely positive. Time after time, studies have shown that when you change answers, 75-80% of the time you change it to a wrong answer. The only time you should change an answer is if you are absolutely positive or if you have miskeyed an answer. (For example, you intended to mark "C" and you inadvertently marked "B".)

    9. Don't be afraid to guess at an answer. Most firefighter examinations are scored based on the number of correct answers. On most examinations, there is no penalty for a wrong answer. If you have three minutes remaining on the examination and 15 questions to answer, try to answer as many as possible, but if time does not allow, at least put an answer down for every question.

    Visit www.fireprep.com for more information on test taking strategy and advice.

    "Nothing counts 'til you have the badge . . . Nothing!"

    Fire "Captain Bob" Author, Becoming A Firefighter
    http://eatstress.com/firefighterbook.htm

    www.eatstress.com

    888-238-3959
    Last edited by CaptBob; 09-13-2004 at 01:06 AM.

  3. #3
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    May 2004
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    Default

    Thanks Capt Bob. I am confident in my ability to pass the test, I just want every advantage I can get to make sure I pass. I will look into some of those books. I just got my results back from my NREMT-B test, and I passed it. Now, I just need to pass my fire test and I will be set.
    Bryan "Moose"
    E641
    FireFighter
    NREMT-B
    HAZMAT

  4. #4
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    Aug 2002
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    Default

    Since the written and physical are usually pass/fail the real secret in getting a firefighter job is passing the oral board high enough to get a shot at the badge.

    What most candidates do if they don't place high enough on the oral is go back and try to pack on more credentials. “Oh, I have to finish my degree or get through that academy” They do little to nothing in gaining the skills for the oral board, which is usually 100% of the score. If you don't do anything to improve your oral board skills nothing is going to change, you will never, ever see that badge. The oral board is for all the marbles. This is where the rubber meets the road.

    As Steve Prziborowski, Fire Captain - Santa Clara County Fire Department wrote:

    Do what you have to do be more marketable so you can take more tests and have something more to offer a department, but remember that it all comes down to that 15 to 30 minute oral interview. I've seen some awesome candidates with resumes packed full of accomplishments that couldn't sell them self in an interview to even make the top 50%.

    "Nothing counts 'til you have the badge . . . Nothing!"

    Fire "Captain Bob" Author, Becoming A Firefighter
    http://eatstress.com/firefighterbook.htm

    www.eatstress.com

    888-238-3959

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