1. #1
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    Unhappy Disappointed ....

    Just curious how the firefighter turnout at 911 Memorial ceremonies were around the country. I went to 2 here in northwest Louisiana on Saturday and the only firefighters there were the Chief officers who were participating or the shift firefighters at the station next to where the cerenomy was being held (who I am sure where told to be there).
    I am very disappointed and in fact, downright ****ed at how WE in this part of the country have seem to forgotten the sacrifice that was made on 911..... Guess that 1 hour to remember the 343 on a Saturday was just TOO MUCH of a sacrifice for the firefighting community in my area to make ....

    Just my thoughts.

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    The majority of my department was able to go to the Healing field for some of the ceremonies, keep in mind, we're all volunteer. Me, I couldn't go, couldn't get out of work. I did, however, convince my boss to let me wear my uniform for the weekend in honor of 9-11. I feel that even though many FD units weren't there, they didn't forget. Never Forgotten.

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    Default Pa state commissioner words

    I was in attendance and many prople echoed the response of the fire commissioner.

    People forgetting the meaning of 9/11

    By Michael Aubele
    VALLEY NEWS DISPATCH
    Sunday, September 12, 2004


    WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP -- Gina Scheller said some of the remarks she heard Saturday during a Sept. 11, 2001, memorial service for volunteer emergency services personnel resonated with her.
    Scheller, of the township, said state Fire Commissioner Ed Mann was speaking a sad truth when he told those that gathered for the service at Kunkle Park that many Americans seem to have forgotten about the importance of the events that transpired on Sept. 11.

    "He was right on the money," she said.

    Dozens gathered for special music, prayer and dialogue in honor of those who sacrificed their lives three years ago Saturday. The bulletin for the service quoted a passage from the Gospel of John that reads, "Greater love hath no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends."
    Mann, the keynote speaker, said the message he wanted to share, on the anniversary of the worst terrorist attacks to besiege the U.S. , was that for those who let the gravity of those events fade over the years, "it's time to recommit yourself to our country."

    Mann said that in the days and weeks that followed Sept. 11, it was not unusual for people to talk to strangers or beep or wave when they passed a car with an American flag flying from its antenna.

    He said it's unfortunate that the bond Americans shared at that time has dwindled. Few people wave anymore, he said. Fewer flags are flying and fewer memorial services are being held.

    "I believe that sometimes our memories are short," he said.

    Resident John Amato said he drew a lot of inspiration from Mann's words. "It really hit home," he said.

    Like many others, Amato said he remembers exactly where he was when he heard the news of the attack on the World Trade Center.

    "I thought it was an accident," he said. He was in Canada at the time.

    Township volunteer fire department Chief Ken Bailey said he thinks about the events of Sept. 11 on a daily basis. Much of it has to do with the fact that he is a fireman, he said.

    Bailey drew on words used by Mann, saying the emergency services community, "really is like a brotherhood."

    Frank Filo, assistant township fire chief and a fire chief in the Air National Guard, said the anniversary of Sept. 11 also makes him think about the men and women serving overseas. Like Bailey, he said he thinks about Sept. 11 on a daily basis and is saddened that fewer flags are flying today.

    "Things just seem less patriotic," Filo said.

    Resident Judy Olszewski said that because of the dwindling patriotism, services like the one held Saturday are all the more important.

    "It's kinda neat to see things like this at home," she said.
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  4. #4
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    I, for one, remember my lost friends everyday. A memorial service for an hour on 1 day is meaningless to me.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    LAFIRE,

    We had a pretty decent turnout up at Overlook Park in South Burlington. I'd say we grew a pretty large crowd...

    Captain Rounds, Captain Datillio, Chief Brent, all stood up and spoke. A member of the public stood and recited a poem that she had never told anyone before.

    We stuck around for a while, and as the night came to an end, VTANG banged us out for a PHASE at the airport. Plan without flaps.

    Night came to a nice and quiet end. Best part was, all of the brothers got home safe...
    Last edited by 42VTExplorer; 09-13-2004 at 12:28 PM.

  6. #6
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    My department has an annual Summmer gathering that we managed to incorporate our memorial into. Very decent turnout and very eloquent words.

    My disappointment came earlier in the day though: I was listening to the radio and the announcers were talking about the baseball game and the memorial that took place before. According to them there was a slideshow depicting the Pentagon and Pennsylvania. Then one of them stated, "There were no pictures of the World Trade Centers. Thankfully, because I do not want to look at another picture of them because of the memories they bring back."

    I was dumbfounded! I thought to myself, well we've taken a first step in trying to forget what we never should.

    bam

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    I wouldn't let it get you down too much... it's human nature. The novelty wears off and it is business as usual. What do we do for Pearl Harbor these days? The family goes to the site and as a semi-private ceremony? It's date is highlighted by all the calendar manufacturers? I wasn't around then to know what it was like in the first few years but I am guessing that it was somewhat similar.

    While it was a terrible day in American History, we must begin to put our lives back together best we can and move on. If that means attending a memorial service for you personally than so be it, but we don't all deal with it and remember it the same way. While I did watch the coverage from NYC on TV until they read my friend's name it was not to remember as I can never forget the images I have burned in my head from my depts staging area on the NJ side of the river that day(and night).

    Personally, I agree with Bones... I think about it everyday not just 1 hour out of the 8,760 that make up a year. Every time I pass my friend's house and know his wife and kids are in there without him, everytime I see the NYC skyline with something missing, etc. Removing the personal connection and thinking about the loss of 343 FDNY and the 37 PAPD(I have family who were wearing PAPD blue that day)... I have a memorial sticker on the back of my helmet. I look at it every time I don my helmet for a job..."this run's for you boys!"

    Hope I don't sound bitter.. just another point of view.

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    I was also ver disappointed with how little TV coverage there seemed to be. I was hoping for maybe a playing of 9/11 (the French Brother's Video), my DVD is shot, and the TV version seems better with the hosts. Saturday night doesn't seem to be "prime time" TV, at least around here. I saw a couple of shows, most were about the aftermath or something like that. I did find a really good one though, it was called "Brothers on Holy Ground", it had interviews with some of the guys, widows, dispatchers, chiefs etc. I think that showed a more personal side of the tragedy. The thing that made me feel good, was to hear a couple FF's outside 10 House, saying something like "the brothers up in heaven wouldn't want us down here worrying about them or being sad, they'd want us smiling and laughing and carrying on." I know that's easier said than done for many, many people, but I think it's good to strive for.

    NEVER FORGET--BUT WE'VE GOT TO LIVE FOR THE BROTHERS WHO NO LONGER CAN

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    Let me start by saying I am not a Firefighter, so if you want to skip my reply you can. The reason I am not is life has gotten too far ahead of me to change careers. In my heart I know where I belong though. I feel that maybe in this topic I can find a few that can relate to how I feel. Not that my wife is not concerned about what happened 3 yrs ago, its just that she and what seems like alot of the rest country just dont get it. What all was lost on that day will never be understood by most. My day started by setting the alarm to get up early. Saturday is the only day of the week to get a few hrs rest, but this day for me as I am sure for the rest of you was no regular day, the sleep can come later. Of course right off the bat I get questioned about why I was getting up so early, no need to explain to someone who just dosent understand. I wish I could have been alone with my feelings that morning, but I wasent. As outoffocus mentioned I have the 9/11 tape by the French guys, so later in the day when it was nap time for the kids I watched it. While I was watching it, I couldnt help but wonder as the crews were first ariving at the WTC, what were they thinking. To me, first what in the hell had just happened, and next the size of the fire that they were faced with had to overwheling. But, without thought they were all doing what you guys are susposed to do, save lives. Without thought or care for their ownselves. I really dont know where I am going with this other than like I said before, I am not a Firefighter, I have noone I can relate my feelings to that might be able to share the same. I know on that day 3000 people were murdered, but its more about the 343 FDNY members that mean the most to me. I still to this day hate when I see one of our Arabic bastard immigrates walking or driving around. For I am sure that way more of them were happy on that day than sad. But back to the wife. We had to go out to pick up a few things, and as she was writing the check, she turns to me and ask "what is today"??!! I just gave her a stare and shook my head, the clerk told her the date. I ended the day at 2400 with to what I felt was my honor to the 343 FDNY that gave their life by listening to The 48th High Scotland The Brave Bagpipe"s Amazing Grace. So in closing, I am sorry if I have overstepped my bounds by posting here, but I for one, will NEVER FORGET!
    And by the way, here in Lexington, Ky, I knew of no official memorial service. Thanks for your time. Charles.

  10. #10
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    Unhappy

    I would never try to compare my feelings with those of people who truly experienced loss that day. I'd never try to pretend I know how it felt to be there. However, as an American I play September 11th 2001 through my head quite often. I know I will never EVER forget it. I, too, look at the sticker on my helmet and think about what it truly stands for nearly every time I set it in my locker.

    There were a few ceremonies locally on the 11th. But, like has been said, it's more than a 1 hour ceremony. To me it is, at least. Not as many flags are flying, firehouses are getting closed... it's wrong. I was sure to remind everyone I had contact with that day. While it probably didn't mean much in the scheme of things, it meant something to me.
    Last edited by Resq14; 09-15-2004 at 01:42 AM.
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    The wasp sting caused fat lips and sprained ankles at the Cowichan Exhibiition (*read County Fair) never stopped me from remembering who I Am or Where I Came From (*as a firefighter) and I remembered often. Even if no one else did or knew.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

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    Unhappy Never Forget! (But it's okay to move on)

    Originally posted by cnylecat
    I still to this day hate when I see one of our Arabic bastard immigrates walking or driving around. For I am sure that way more of them were happy on that day than sad.
    You didn't overstep any boundaries by posting how the anniversary of the attacks personally affects you. However, I stopped giving your post any credit when you turned it into an attack against innocent people.

    If we're going to start hating people who look like they don't belong here... it'll be time for nearly all of us to leave. I know that my family isn't native to this land.

    Tim McVeigh was a white guy, but I didn't see people hating on white folks after the OKC terrorist attack... So how do the events of 9/11 give anyone the right to openly hate people from the Middle East? Well, they don't. How dare you make the generalization that the majority of an ethncity was happy to see the events of 9/11. That's absurd.

    For someone not directly affected by the day's events, you're still carrying around a lot of anger. Visions of a particular "Rescue Me" scene are coming to mind... Perhaps it's time you consider professional assistance.

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