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  1. #1
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    Default Turn-out gear decontamination

    I'm having difficulty finding a suitable product for use in-house to properly decon turn-out gear after contact with body fluids, or sewage from flood conditions.

    Does anyone have specific product information, or can suggest products I can further research that are suitable for use in-quarters?

    The gear manufacturers I've contacted want us to send all our garments to specific maintenance companies for decon and cleaning. This is time consuming and costly for a process we feel competent to handle as part of our department's normal gear maintenance procedures.

    We are virtually out of our current stock of a product called GED (Gear and Equipment Decontaminator) previously purchased through National Safety Clean. This product is apparently no longer available, and other products are not available for sale as they are considered proprietary to the specific cleaning company.

    If you can be of any assistance with my search, please contact me directly at jmokricky@mtlebanon.org


  2. #2
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    Hope this helps


    http://www.questhq.com/gear_main.html


    Two commercially available cleaners which do meet the above criterion are:
    Versitol™ by Winsol Lab 800-782-5504 and Citri-Squeeze 888-727-3230

    For contamination involving body fluids, LYSOL brand hospital cleaner is a disinfectant which is safe to use on protective fabrics. It can be purchased in gallon containers by calling 800-677-9218 or at your local industrial cleaning supply house.

  3. #3
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    Swampbox,
    Thanks for your reply.
    We already use Winsol's Versitol and Specialty Fabric Cleaner as part of our normal cleaning processes, but they are not for bio-hazards. Winsol's IDO is not able to be purchased in Pennsylvania due to product testing and registry. It is also reported by Winsol to be the same as Scott's Multi-wash. Scott says the Multi-wash hasn't been used for turn-out gear. It only appears to be good for respirators and face pieces.

    A few years back a professional cleaning company also suggested using hospital grade Lysol for decon. When I checked with National Safety Clean (a reputable turn-out gear maintenance company) my contact gasped deeply fearful I had actually used the Lysol and strongly recommended against it.

    Following your suggestion about Citrisqueeze leads me to another product from EMCO Industries, Inc. called Citro-D Neutral pH Disinfectant Concentrate. This looks the most promising so far. I intend to contact them Monday to confirm usability, shelf life, cost and local dealers.

    Thanks for your suggestions. I'm still open to other thoughts.
    L-Mo

  4. #4
    Senior Member Dalmatian90's Avatar
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    Makes you wonder how much of this is "smoke and mirrors" of the Wizard of Oz (the cleaning companies) hiding behind "trade secrets" to make what one would think is a simple process complicated and convoluted. And add in a health dash of gear companies so afraid of the liability lawyers they're left with the answer, "By a competent professional."
    IACOJ Canine Officer
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  5. #5
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    I have been using the company 911 safety equipment for almost a year to clean my station's gear. I believe they might sell something that you can use in-house to clean your gear. They are located in Norristown, PA (just outside Philly and King of Prussia). Their website is www.911se.com

    I just checked their website. If you go to 'Cleaning product' in the left hand tool bar, the first three products are for cleaning turnout gear.

    If you and when you call them, ask for Dan. He is a nice guy and has not lead me wrong.

    Good Luck on your search and let me know how you make out.

  6. #6
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    To Safety33

    Thanks for your posting. I checked the website you indicated and found they are distributing the Citro product line. These products are apparently manufactured by EMCO Industries (www.emcoindustries.com) and include Citro-D and TC-D.

    EMCO's posted website prices are higher than a distributor EMCO suggested (www.marylandfire.com).

    Maryland Fire and 911 Safety are equal in pricing for products shown on 911's site. 911 doesn't specifically show Citro-D on their site, and I received a faxed price quote from Maryland Fire showing MSRP from EMCO.

    EMCO's site offers "customer" testimonial, but none specifically mention the use of Citro-D, only the Citrosqueeze Cleaner. So far I contacted one "customer" and have received favorable comments.

    Does your department have any standing SOP's or SOG's covering decon as we are discussing? I'd be interested in reviewing them to upgrade our procedures once I make a final determination on products and see what the manufacturers have to say. You can contact me by e-mail jmokricky@mtlebanon.org or fax to 412-343-1697 ATTN: L-Mo

    If you saw any news coverage from the Pittsburgh area after hurricane Ivan caused flooding of entire communities, you'll remember one firefighter died after contracting a flesh eating disease from the floodwaters. With the amount of rain that fell causing that much flooding you wouldn't think sewage would be concentrated enough to be a problem.---Think again. And normal washing of turn-out gear supposedly won't handle the contamination issues.

    Thanks for your interest. L-Mo

  7. #7
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    Imolmo-

    I apologize for taking so long to respond back to you. i do not think my company does not have any SOPs concerning decon of gear or equipment that I am aware of. We have been updating our SOPs, so I will take a look. In most cases, if the gear becomes contiminated, we send it out for cleaning or just throw it out but it depends on what is contiminated.

  8. #8
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    Default Gear Decon

    I WOULD RECOMMEND TAKING THE GEAR TO YOUR LOCAL DRY CLEANERS. MY DEPARTMENT DOES THAT AND IT ONLY COSTS $15.00 A SET AND YOU DO NOT HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT IT. MAKE SURE YOU HAVE EXTRA GEAR AROUND BECAUSE IT WILL TAKE APPROX. A WEEK FOR IT TO BE DONE. THE DRY CLEANERS ARE HELPFUL AND AS LONG AS YOU LET THEM KNOW IT IS BIOHAZARDOUS IT IS MUCH EASIER THAN DOING IT YOURSELF.

  9. #9
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    Default No...

    No I dont. Because I would never wash my gear in my home
    machines.

    Bare minimal, wash them outside on the driveway and
    hang in the backyard to dry.

  10. #10
    dazed and confused Resq14's Avatar
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    There are NFPA and manufacturer guidelines on how PPE is to be cleaned. READ THE TAGS THAT COME WITH THE GEAR, or call the manufacturer. There really aren't gray areas, or "in a pinch do this." If your dry cleaner is certified to do environmental disinfection, it is an option. Just be sure they conform to the recommended process (no chlorine bleach, etc).

    As far as products, I wouldn't consider stuff with iodine as this has a tendency to turn things a lovely shade of orangey-yellow.

    I'll look at one of the products we pre-treat with prior to washing in the extractor.

    General Manufacturer's Instructions

    NFPA 1851 states that the manufacturer's instructions shall always take precedence over those of NFPA 1851.

    Failure to follow the manufacturer's instructions may cause damage to the gear and void any warranties. The following laundering instructions are those of Securitex and vary slightly from those of NFPA 1851. If you are using turnout gear other than Securitex or FireGear, ask the manufacturer thereof for recommendations.

    Don'ts
    Do not use high-velocity power washers or hose streams for cleaning. You may seriously damage the fabrics, seams and reflective trim.
    Do not scrub vigorously with any brush. Moisture barrier and thermal liner materials, seams and reflective trim are particularly vulnerable.
    Do not use any cleaning agent that has a pH greater than 8.0. Even one washing with a high-pH cleaning agent may cause a dramatic and irreversible reduction in the durability and performance of the turnout gear fabrics and trim.
    Do not allow wash or rinse water temperature to exceed 105°F. Higher temperatures will increase fabric shrinkageand risk of degrading the reflective trim.
    Do not use, under any circumstances, chlorine bleach or chlorinated solvents. Even one washing with chlorine bleach may cause a dramatic and irreversible reduction in the durability and performance of the turnout gear fabrics.
    Do not clean soiled or contaminated protective clothing with anything other than similar items of PPE; i.e. clean bunker coats and pants only with bunker coats and pants.

    Do's
    Do use specialty turnout gear cleaner and spotter having neutral pH (5.0 to 8.0). Such products should only be purchased from reputable companies that guarantee that their products are specifically intended for cleaning turnout gear. Examples of such products are Winsol and Citrosqueeze.
    Where liners are separable from outer shells, do clean liners only with liners, and outer shells only with outer shells.
    Last edited by Resq14; 02-12-2005 at 02:56 AM.
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  11. #11
    dazed and confused Resq14's Avatar
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    Default The following document is authored and maintained by Globe Manufacturing.

    The source document appears in its entirety below and is unedited except for comments in red. These comments represent Bergeron Protective Clothing's view on the specific topic. Our intention is not to provoke controversy but to stimulate thought relative to an increasingly important subject.

    Overview

    Recently there has been a greater awareness among firefighters for the need to have turnout clothing laundered regularly. The NFPA Technical Committee for structural clothing addressed this in the 1991 revision of NFPA 1971, by adding an appendix item dedicated exclusively to the care and cleaning of bunker clothing. Simply put, clean protective clothing reduces the potential for health and safety risks. In February of 2001, NFPA published a new user document for the Selection, Care, and Maintenance of Protective Clothing (NFPA 1851). This standard sets minimum requirements for the inspection, care and cleaning of all protective elements covered by NFPA 1971. The Globe label on every garment provides basic information for laundering; however, what follows is a much more comprehensive set of instructions for cleaning gear.

    Guidelines


    If the Liners are detachable, they should be removed from the Shell and laundered separately.
    All closures should be fastened: Velcro® hook covering pile, hooks & dees fastened, zippers zipped and snaps closed. It is imperative that you cover the hook portion of all Velcro® to prevent snagging during laundering.
    We recommend a front loading washer machine, which does not have an agitator, and preferably one that is designated specifically for cleaning turnouts. A stainless steel tub should be utilized if available.
    We suggest using a laundry bag to protect the inside of the washing machine from the hooks & dees (and to protect the hooks & dees from the agitator of a washing machine when using a top load model).
    BPC Comment - Laundry Bag: Many manufacturers recommend the use of a laundry bag to help protect a garment from friction especially in top loading machines. The use of top loading machines and the use of a laundry bag are not recommended. It is inherently difficult for any detergent to "access" the entire garment when in a laundry bag and thorough rinsing will be equally difficult. We have found that the use of a laundry bag inhibits the cleaning and rinsing processes such that a garment may appear clean but in fact may still be contaminated to some degree.

    Machine Washing – The special fabrics that make up your turnouts contain inherent flame and heat resistance properties, which cannot be washed off or worn out. However, given the nature of the contaminants to which firefighters are exposed, we recommend that you never, never, use the same machine that you do your home laundry in. When machine washing, always prepare the clothing as directed, by fastening all closure systems. Use warm water and a normal cycle. Following each complete wash cycle, thoroughly rinse your garments; we recommend a double rinse with clear water.

    Protective clothing should always be washed separately in a laundry bag; do not overload the washing machine, do not use softeners, and NEVER use chlorine bleach. We do not suggest machine drying; our recommendation is to hang in a shaded area that receives good cross ventilation or hang on a line and use a fan to circulate the air. Naturally, the turnout system will dry more quickly if you separate the layers for laundering and if you turn the liner system inside out to facilitate drying of the quilt Thermal Barrier.

    BPC Comment - Water Temperature: Manufacturers guidelines recommend using “warm water”. Water temperature is very critical to a successful cleaning. If it is not warm enough it will not break down any oils (including body oils) or fatty acids. This would be similar to washing bacon grease from a frying pan in a cold brook. If the water is too hot you will begin to develop problems with the adhesives that hold together any hook and loop (such as Velcro) and eventually problems with the integrity of reflective trim by breaking down the boding agents that hold the trim together. Recommended water temperature for effective cleaning is 100-120 degrees F. Many commercial extractors that are purchased for use in a Fire Station do not have the ability to control water temperature accurately.

    Cleansers – Cleansers generally fall into two categories, detergents and soaps. Of the two, detergents make the best cleansers because they are formulated to contain special agents that help prevent redeposition of soil. Soil redeposition is soil which is first removed from a laundered article, but later in the same wash cycle is redeposited as a thin soil film on the entire surface of the article. All cleaning agents are clearly labeled as being either detergents or soaps; and we recommend liquid detergents, since they are less likely to leave any residue on the clothing. Examples of some of the better known detergents would be Cheer or Tide.

    BPC Comment - Cleansers generally fall into three categories, detergents, soaps and surfactants. Of the three, surfactants make the best cleansers because they are formulated to contain special agents that help prevent redeposition of soil. Soil redeposition is soil which is first removed from a laundered article, but later in the same wash cycle is redeposited as a thin soil film on the entire surface of the article. All cleaning agents are clearly labeled and we recommend liquid detergents, since they are less likely to leave any residue on the clothing.
    Spot Cleaning and Pretreating – Precleaners can be used to clean light spots and stains on protective clothing. Squirt the precleaner onto the soiled area and gently rub fabric together until a light foam appears on the surface; this foam should be completely rinsed off with cool water prior to washing. A soft bristle brush, such as a toothbrush may be used to gently scrub the soiled area for approximately one to one and a half minutes. An alternative method would be to pretreat garment by applying liquid detergent directly from the bottle onto the soiled area and proceed as with precleaners. Any spot cleaning or pretreating should be followed by machine washing prior to field use.

    Special Cleaning Compounds – Since Globe is in the business of producing firefighters clothing and not cleaning agents, we are not able to "endorse" any of the special compounds that are being advertised for the fire service, such as Winsol or Smoke Out. However, we would recommend that each department interested in these specific cleaning agents contact the manufacturers directly and make your own determination as to suitability. The appendix on cleaning found in the 1991 edition of NFPA 1971, includes the following examples of household products that may be utilized for normal laundering, spot treating and pretreating:

    Detergents: Liquid Cheer, Liquid Fab, Liquid Tide, Liquid Wisk
    Oxygenated Bleaches: Liquid Clorox 2, Liquid Vivid
    Spot Cleaning and Pretreating: Liquid Spray & Wash, Liquid Tide, Liquid Shout, Liquid Dishwashing Detergent

    BPC Comment - We do not recommend any specific cleaning agent.

    Dry Cleaning – The protective qualities of your Globe turnout clothing will not be adversely affected by dry cleaning. However, dry cleaning can completely ruin trim and is therefore not recommended.

    Removing Oil or Tar – Oil based soils such as motor oil and tar can be removed with solvents such as "Varsol" prior to washing, says E.I. DuPont, producers of NOMEX® fibers. However, they do add the cautionary statement that the garment must be thoroughly washed and rinsed to insure that all residual solvent is completely removed. They also point out that coated material should never be dry cleaned. You must always avoid using solvents on the leather or reflective trim.

    BPC Comment - It is ok as long as absolutely all of the Varsol is removed from the fabric. Varsol is actually a flammable product if allowed to accumulate in the fabrics of the garment. We recommend 12 rinse cycles as a means to assure the cleaning agent is effectively removed from the garment.
    Bleach – One of the most often asked questions concerns the decontamination of a turnout system, especially with chlorine bleach. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES should chlorine bleach be used on firefighters clothing; most systems contain KEVLAR®, either as a blend or as the primary fiber, and KEVLAR® is completely destroyed by exposure to bleach. If it is absolutely essential that a bleach be used, we recommend 1/2 cup of liquid oxygenated bleach to one cup of detergent.

    Trim – 3M, the manufacturer of both Scotchlite™ and Triple Trim, recommend that the following guidelines be used for their product: 1) Damp wipe, using warm water and mild detergent. Rinse thoroughly, dry with a soft cloth, or allow to air dry. (2) If you choose to machine wash, use warm water. (3) Do not dry clean. The producers of Reflexite® trim state that dry cleaning is not permissible under any circumstances, nor is ironing ever allowed. Their recommendation is that you use a soft rag or sponge and that denatured alcohol be used as a cleaning agent. They advise against abrasive cleaners, strong solvents, and machine drying.

    Decontamination – For extreme contamination with products of combustion, fire debris or body fluids, removal of the contaminant’s by flushing with water as soon as possible is necessary, followed by appropriate cleaning. In the case of bloodborne pathogens, recommended decontamination procedures include using a .5 to 1% concentration of Lysol, or a 3-6% concentration of stabilized hydrogen peroxide. Liquid glutaraldehyde, available through commercial sources, will also provide high to intermediate levels of disinfectant activity. Decontamination may not be possible when protective clothing is contaminated with chemical, biological or radiological agents. When decontamination is not possible, the garments should be discarded in accordance with local, State and Federal regulations. Garments that are discarded should be destroyed.

    BPC Comment - We recommend the use of a commercial cleaning service for decontamination of turnout gear. Even if you were trained in the use of these decontamination agents, getting the proper percentage of agent into the wash cycle is usually beyond the capabilities of the personnel at the fire department.
    Hand Washing – Hand washing was thought to be the least abrasive method of laundering, and allowed the user to pay special attention to those areas that required it. The industry now recognizes that hand washing is generally not able to remove the ground-in soil embedded in the material fibers and usually only serves to remove surface dirt. However, in the event that you do not have access to a washing machine and must hand wash your garment, remove your liner system and lay the Outer Shell on a non-abrasive hard surface. Using a soft bristle scrub brush and a detergent (not soap), clean your garment by making circular motions with the brush, forming progressively larger circles until the entire surface has been washed. You must then rinse the shell, using clear water, to insure that all of the detergent has been removed. We recommend that you rinse the entire garment several times to avoid any possibility of soil detergent residue.

    Outside Cleaning and Assistance – One final question we are often asked is whether the gear can be or even should be cleaned by a professional. We are aware of several outside agencies who specialize in the cleaning of turnout clothing and just as Globe is the expert in the cutting and stitching of protective clothing, these facilities are the experts in cleaning. Since we have no control over any of their processes, we obviously cannot endorse or authorize any one of these services over another; however, we do believe they offer a valuable service and we encourage our customers to contact any of these outside cleaning facilities to determine if they are able to meet the fire department needs. Some possible questions to ask would be if they have ever had 3rd party training or testing, if they provide any warranties on their services, and whether they are able to give any guarantees concerning the effectiveness of their cleaning.

    CONCLUSION
    In caring for your turnout clothing, you must always remember that it features 3-piece layering and you must consider every single layer when deciding how to clean. We do encourage every department to keep their clothing clean and to routinely inspect and repair as needed. Clean turnout gear is lighter in weight, lasts longer, and is more visible than dirty turnout gear. Having dirt, soot, and other debris clinging to your gear presents a safety hazard.
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  12. #12
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    For those who might see this thread for reference later, there is no cut and dry product that you add to your washer and it decons your gear. It's usually a process with a few steps and specialty equipment. NFPA won't let you use bleach or oil based products on your gear so it is tough to find a solution in a bottle. Over use any of the steps and you've ruined your gear. I would really discourage using a drycleaner since they normally don't conform to NFPA temperatures and the dry cleaning solutions will destroy the moisture barrier in the liner. I can give advice on what you could to on your own or give my company a call.

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    PS: Good work Resq14

  13. #13
    Forum Member MemphisE34a's Avatar
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    For exposure to body fluids as long as it is not gross decontamination.

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    RK
    cell #901-494-9437

    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

  14. #14
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    I always thought you were supposed to use a combination of an approved detergent and higher temperature water. The detergent does the cleaning and the high temp water does the disinfecting.

  15. #15
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    I know the OP is about 5 years old but its my point of view when it comes to biological contamination of turnout gear you should take it to someone that knows what they are doing, whether it be an outside contractor or if you have the proper equipment in house letting the guy who knows what he is doing handle it.

    But I think Catch 22 is right, for bio you need a gear washer that has higher temps than for plain old soot washing. At least that's what I've been told when I've got blood on my goods.

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