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  1. #1
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    Default Ferrara Strong Arm

    Talk about a crazy new truck, tell me what you think abotu something like this over a squirt...
    http://www.strongarmfirefighting.com/
    Bucks County, PA.


  2. #2
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    I stumbled across it a couple of days ago. Man, what a concept. If you can't get in and put it out, you just tear it down. If you don't feel like getting in there and putting it out, just tear it down. I think its another gadget device that someone, somewhere will have to buy just to have one. Personally, I see a very limited, I mean limited, application to structural fire fighting unless your more interested in creating a fire break than fighting fire. This device does nothing but multiply the dollar loss to the structure to say nothing of the contents which don't stand a chance. Oh well, if you build it, someone will buy it and put a nifty slogan on the side of it. LOL. Just some thoughts.

    Stay low and move it in.
    Stay low and move it in.

    Be safe.


    Larry

  3. #3
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    I think it may be a workabe evolution of the Squirt. Mabye this tool could be used wrong but most are at times. I don't think it should necessarly be used as a wreaking ball with a super soaker stuck on it. But more a squirt with the ability to vent and other ops without risking roof ops when they appear risky. You may be able to save more buldings by not risking anyone to get the first vents going and then being sure you can start work. Who knows...
    Bucks County, PA.

  4. #4
    Forum Member ff43065's Avatar
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    Station2,

    We finally agree on something. Wonder what the odds are of getting sued by an insurance company for excessive damage.

    I guess if you has too much money to spend and had a lot of fires in freight trailers, then maybe it would have an application.

    Maybe they should reconsider instead of selling it to fire departments, sell it to demolition crews.

  5. #5
    FH Mag/.com Contributor
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    Or it could be that they're finally designing something meant for what people are doing anyway. I've seen pics and videos of departments using the tips of the aerial to smash hi-rise windows for ventilation, and also drop them on unstable roofs to do the same. Question is, who really has that many fires where something like this would come in handy? Dang near every single family house fire I've been to, if we couldn't get it, it self-ventilated so no need to smash the roof and drop nozzle.

    I wouldn't want one. That would take the fun out of getting inside to GIT-R-DONE!

  6. #6
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    Default

    Are we supposed to believe that pushing it on top of a roof (in an attempt to get through the roof) wouldn't bring the roof collapsing down? What scares me is that people may think this is actually a good idea.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  7. #7
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    BC79er, as for using the tip of an aerial for ventilating windows, why not? Its been an proven tactic and used with great success. You just need an A/O who knows his job and his rig. Just a thought.

    FF43065, yeah its kind of scary huh? But we can both agree, if they put another name on the side of it and put nifty neat gizmos for loading limits and blue illumination lights it might be alright huh? LOL.

    Stay low and move it in.
    Last edited by STATION2; 10-12-2004 at 03:56 PM.
    Stay low and move it in.

    Be safe.


    Larry

  8. #8
    FH Mag/.com Contributor
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    Didn't say it was a bad idea Larry, just FF ingenutity as usual, using what you have in front of you to get the job done.

    Devil's Advocate : if the aerial is damaged while doing such a manuever, do you want to be the one that isn't going to be rescued by it? As normally happens on a scene, trucks are stuck where the parking brake got pulled, and depending on the building, odds are really good you won't get another one in place in time to pull off a rescue. Seen too many that were damaged and couldn't be bedded because someone hit a beam instead of the window. Aluminum and steel aerials, so manufacturer wasn't a factor. Tips snapped, rungs and beams broken. It's all possible. Like you said, operator has to know what he's doing and what the aerial is going to be hitting.

  9. #9
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    The scariest thing about this truck is that Ferrara came out with it in the first place. Sorry to be negative but just a bad feeling. It micht have its uses but i really feel they would be limited.

  10. #10
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    On the bus ride to the Ferrara plant during FRI, one of the Ferrara employees said they didn't receive the strong arm contraption from Gradall until 2wks before the show. They built the whole truck and shot all the promo videos/literature during that 2wk timeframe. I wonder how much engineering went into the total package before rolling this thing out given that rushed time schedule. Just a thought.

  11. #11
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    A fire dept. near me has something simialar to that, it is called a Snozzle. It is a lot smaller though. I don't know if it is capable of tearing through concrete walls, but here in rural America we don't really have to worry about that too much. Mostly theirs is used to punch through the tops, or sides of steel tanks to extinguish flammable liquid fires. Or to provide aerial smoke, and dust control at dairy fires.

  12. #12
    MembersZone Subscriber AC1503's Avatar
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    I've never been around a Ferrara truck, but I've worked with a lot of Gradall heavy equipment. Gradall makes very good, very tough equipment. Has anyone seen a price list? I'll bet that it is also through the roof.

  13. #13
    Forum Member TCFire's Avatar
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    There's a company in our county who have a Snozzle on one of their trucks. We were at a live burn drill several years ago after they'd put the truck in service. They went to try and penetrate the roof (wood frame house with typical roof deck, shingles) with the Snozzle and had to quit after the arm started to flex past the point of no return. Sounds good in theory but in a real life application........? Color me skeptical.

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