1. #1
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    Default small single apparatus companies/departments

    would like to hear from any 1 piece companies out there-runs/year,age/type apparatus-describe your department-link to web site ,if you have one.

  2. #2
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    I work for a combination department that only staffs one engine 24/7. Our volunteers are usually responsible for responding with the truck company -- but that doesn't always happen.

    So, obviously, with only one engine staffed, we don't know when the second rig is coming or where it's coming from. We must catch the plug on any call with smoke showing. We must also be ready to request mutual aid early in an incident for it to be of benefit.

  3. #3
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    We were a single engine volley department until July when we received our new ALF 1050 Pumper. Our original engine is a 1979 King Seagrave front mounted 840gpm pumper with a regular cab (3 man) and four side-compartment mounted SCBA. Our call volume is about 150-200 calls/yr, and mostly medical/mva/false alarms to local hotels. Our membership is 20-25, with high turnover among rookies due to the transient nature of our ski town.

    The tiny single engine means we struggle with all the traditional small dept problems like excessive POV responses (and yes, arguing about lights on POV's ), limited manpower and gear, and limited pumping capacity. To make it worse, we had no mutual aid agreements, so we were on our own. All repairs and service had to be done on site, which meant there were a lot of bubblegum repairs done over the years to keep the truck in service. We are finally getting most of those fixed properly now.

    The new crew cab engine has already changed our operations dramatically. We have also ordered an ALF 65' Telesquirt for March/April delivery, and a light rescue for February delivery. This means serious changes to how we manage personnel and equipment on scene. We have already reduced POV responses to scenes, and that is a big improvement. When the crew cab Squirt and 5-man light rescue arrive, we should not need any POV's to transport personnel to scenes, and I can't wait. We are slowly transforming the old engine to a water supply and wildland role. It is well suited to this with pump-and-roll capabilities, and a very short wheelbase. The front mounted pump also allows for drafting and relaying from tight spots.

    The old engine currently carries our wajax forestry pump and gear with 1000 feet of hose, as well as 500' of NDH and 500' of LDH firefighting hose with a 250' preconnected hand-line. It carries a new 720 gpm portable pump with twin NDH outlets, and now carries only very basic structural tools (axes, etc). The majority of structural tools have been moved to the new engine, and will be further divided to engine/truck roles once the squirt gets here.

    Progress is a wonderful thing.
    Last edited by mcaldwell; 10-30-2004 at 03:50 PM.
    Never argue with an Idiot. They drag you down to their level, and then beat you with experience!

    IACOJ

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    Wow ,, this post is forcing me to recall some some dusty (and dare I say alchol fogged) memories of my days on my college fire department way back in the very early 80s. We were a student run fire department that responded to all calls on our campus.. primarily alarms and smoke (being a college we won't discuss what kind of smoke) in the buildings. Every once in a while we might catch a vehicle fire or a brush fire on campus, and even now and then we may get an oven or stove fire. We did a fair amount of mutual aid with most of the local towns who had very limited resources. Caught a lot of good fires that way, though our relationship with the department in the town in which we were located in wasn't the best, primarily due to some cocky past chiefs. I served as a captain, training officer and chief in my 5 years. We ran an Dodge power wagon 3/4 ton with a front mount 750 gpm pump (usually was water supply at mutual aid), a 400 gallon tank, some 3" and attack lines and a couple of airpacks and tools. Sure wasn't the best equipped rig but we managed to make it work and did some amazin' stuff with it. Wow all this nastalgia is bringing back a sudden urge to buy some canadian beer and fire up a .... well those were sure good days.

    Just my thoughts .... and please don't bogart that joint my friend.

  5. #5
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    LAFIRE, did you got to school here in VT?

    Norwich? St Mikes? UVM (Ems only I thought..) ?

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    Erie 4 in Georgetown MA is a private fire company that only has one rig. Georgetown has a regualar fd, but Erie 4 goes when they want.
    I dont suffer from insanity, I enjoy every minute of it.

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    Smile

    The Department I started with in 1969 had three all volunteer companies. One ran a single engine, another an engine and brush/water supply, and my company ran an engine and 85 foot Suthpen tower. There were large turnouts by all companies and the three units worked well together.

    Where I am now also has three companies. One runs an engine and fire rescue. The second with paid crews 24/7 runs two engines and ladder. My company runs a single engine; a '69 LaFrance 1250 gpm. She's a real gem that still runs and pumps like a raped ape !!!
    In '72 the company bought an old rig and started a volunteer ambulance corps. The corps grew like a weed and today we house in the same station with our engine; a rescue, 3 ALS, 4 BLS, 2 QRVs and 4 para-transports.
    We have paid EMS crews 24/7, but the fire company is still volunteer.
    Combined our station pulled just under 7,000 incident numbers last year. -bob-

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    For those with just one engine in their department, what happens when it's down due to maintiance problems or testing? Do you have mutual aid lined up and standing by?
    Recently a combination department in my Parish (county) was working a bad house fire. A call came in for a Motor Vehicle Accident with Injuries in thier district. They requested a neighboring volunteer department be dispatched to the MVA. Dispatch paged the neighboring department and a few minutes later a vollie from that FD keyed up his portable radio that he was responding to the station to get their truck. A few minutes later that same person came across the radio again to say that the engine, the only one that department had, was 10-7 (out of service). He responded POV by himself to the scene of the MVA. Luckilly the MVA occupants didn't require extrication and by the time he arrived the private ALS service was loading the patient with help from the city police. Doesn't it suck to depend on mutual aid from a Class 9 or 10 VFD with one pumper which may or may not start when the only person to answer the page gets to the station?

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    Service was a real problem around here in the past. Our nearest neighbouring dept is 30 minutes by engine away, and we did not have a formal mutual aid agreement with them anyway (we were a private dept). When the truck needed service, the mechanic had to bring all his tools up here and rush to get it done. He could not go home until the truck was back in service, so he had to get the parts order right the first time. One emergency body repair (truck vs tree) was done in a monster marathon session between 10 pm and 8 am one night (the paint was still wet when I came in the next day). I can also remember at least 6 calls over the last couple of years where the truck couldn't make it out of the parking lot due to sudden electrical problems. Thankfully they were all false alarms or non-fire calls.

    By the time our new engine arrived, the old one had a slew of major problems that needed serious attention. The pump only pumps 65-70% capacity because we could not send it off to be properly rebuilt until now, and the water tank is so puttied up with leak stop that it is six layers deep on some joints. The clutch thankfully held out until two weeks ago before it finally crapped out, and the electrical system needs a complete overhaul. The clutch has been fixed, and the rest will be done in the spring when the new squirt gets here.

    Our neighboring dept with three engines, a quick response, and a light rescue, always assured us if our truck ever completely died and had to be towed away for repair, that they would lend us thier old 70's Ford Engine, but thankfully it never got quite that bad. the old Ford wasn't in much better condition.
    Never argue with an Idiot. They drag you down to their level, and then beat you with experience!

    IACOJ

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