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  1. #1
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    Default Give me your tricks. Part 3

    It has been a while since the "Tricks" postings. So I thought
    I would start a round for the newer folks.

    I have my list from the old "Part 2" at home, so stay tuned
    for it.

    -Bou

    UPDATE-

    I found my submitted tips from one ofthe old threads. Here they
    are-

    -Always start the chain saw BEFORE mounting the roof.
    You will know it will start and its warmed up for the job.

    -When mopping the entire fire station, do the restrooms LAST
    so you dont mop those collected germs and hairs all over the
    place. (Yes- use warm water and a mild soap)

    -Keep the apparatus windows rolled UP while in quarters. Why?
    Keeps the DUST and BUGS out of the cab. (Spiders like to do
    inside and web the place up)

    -Keep a fat marker pen or construction chaulk in your turnouts.
    Good for search and rescue or patient status marking.

    -Keep a flashlight in your turnout coat AND pocket. One might
    go out and you might not be wearing both items at the same
    time.

    -Keep a penny in your vehicle's glove compartment to measure
    the tire tread. If Abe's head shows (2/32nds), then the tire
    is O/S. (out of service)

    -Turnout coat wet and needs to dry? run a long broom handle
    through it and let the entire coat hang. This will let it
    drip dry faster. (If you dont have an indutrial dryer)

    -Traffic Collision (T/C) aka MVA to the East coasters- Fuel
    leaking from a line? If you cant crimp it, stick a golf tee
    in it. (I carry one in my turnout coat)

    -Vehicle fire- Cant get that damn hood to open and its
    flaming under there? Take that axe, and chop it right in the
    center. THEN turn it 90 degrees to make a nice little hole
    for your nozzle to stick in.

    -Driving Code 3? Remember to keep that "chin up"! Why?
    Keeps you looking forward and farther to project traffic
    movement and project your next move.

    Hope those help. I will post more as I remember them...Bou
    Last edited by CALFFBOU; 06-12-2005 at 01:43 PM.

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    Default Re: Give me your tricks. Part 3

    Originally posted by CALFFBOU
    It has been a while since the "Tricks" postings. So I thought
    I would start around for the newer folks.

    I have my list from part 2 at home, so stay tuned for it.

    -Bou


    PS- Who will be the first to recommend the 'ol nails in the
    coat/helmet trick?
    Yes the nails in the band of your leather helmet will work nicely. Great for chocking multiple doors, although wood chocks would be my first choice if available.

  3. #3
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    Default Wedging doors...

    When it comes to wedging doors, I do NOT recommend using
    your hand tools. (axe, hux bar, haligan tool, etc) I saw a
    large sized FD do that once at the base of the door. I have
    no idea what they were going to use when they reached the
    fire floor and needed tools for forced entry.

    Anyways, I love the wedge its from the fire store. Here is
    your link- http://www.thefirestore.com/store/category.cfm?cID=456


    Last edited by CALFFBOU; 12-25-2004 at 05:51 PM.

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    Default

    I'm newer to fire fighting and I was just curious now that it was mentioned, what exactly do you do witht he nails in the helmet band. I see you said to chock a door. How exactly?
    MFD Truck 2
    The Workhorse Company

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    Default

    Originally posted by mglax13
    I'm newer to fire fighting and I was just curious now that it was mentioned, what exactly do you do witht he nails in the helmet band. I see you said to chock a door. How exactly?
    You open the door, and take you nail, (slightly bent nail) and you put the point end of the nail into the narrow part of the door were you would normally chock a door, then to firm the nail in there, you pull the door close some so the nail gets pushed between the door and the jamb. now the door wont close behind you. there small and light and easy to carry many in a pocket.
    put the wet stuff on the hot stuff.

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    Default

    Originally posted by gunstar34


    You open the door, and take you nail, (slightly bent nail) and you put the point end of the nail into the narrow part of the door were you would normally chock a door, then to firm the nail in there, you pull the door close some so the nail gets pushed between the door and the jamb. now the door wont close behind you. there small and light and easy to carry many in a pocket.

    I am curious as to why you use a "slightly bent nail"?

    I use a 2 1/2" Masonry nail to do the same. I use this method as a back up if I run out of wooden door chocks.

    You open the door and hold the nail between the door and the jamb and pull the door closed a bit and the nail takes a bite into the jamb and prevents the door from closing on you. I use the masonry nails as they are a bit tougher and will penetrate metal doors/jambs.
    Stay alert and be safe.

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    Default

    Originally posted by bolivas203



    I am curious as to why you use a "slightly bent nail"?

    I use a 2 1/2" Masonry nail to do the same. I use this method as a back up if I run out of wooden door chocks.

    You open the door and hold the nail between the door and the jamb and pull the door closed a bit and the nail takes a bite into the jamb and prevents the door from closing on you. I use the masonry nails as they are a bit tougher and will penetrate metal doors/jambs.
    Same here bro...never had a problem.

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    Default

    I know this was already brought up in parts 1 and 2, I love my rubber strap on my helmet. I keep it under my helmet shield on the front of my helmet.

    I keep a pair of trauma shears (on permanent loan from the squad ) and a wooden door chock up there. I have since added a garrity life light to both my department issue leather and my personal helmet as a backup light, and from the one fire i've used them in, they are worth it. Haven't put nails on my helmet yet, still aren't convince they can take the place of a wooden door chock. The trauma sheers are great for MVCs when you need something to cut a seatbelt or expose a trauma patient for assessment.

    I also keep a pair of round-tipped cabled cutters in my bunnker pants, on the off chance (and I pray I never need them) that I get caught up in any wires while doing interior operations in a fire.
    If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

    FF/EMT/DBP

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    Default Re: Wedging doors...

    Originally posted by CALFFBOU

    Anyways, I love the wedge its from the fire store. Here is
    your link- http://www.thefirestore.com/store/category.cfm?cID=456
    I've always got one Firestore wedge in my pocket and a handful of wooden ones. I wind up handing many wooden ones out to other firefighters who don't carry anything(!). The Firestore wedges are a bit too expensive to give away, but they work well in a variety of situations. Mark 'em or lose 'em!
    ullrichk
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    Default One more bit on wedges...

    One thing I forgot about wedges. I love my "wedge it" but
    I also have some wooden ones in my coat as well. I always
    saved them for an actived sprinkler head.

    Well the time finally came and I jammed both of those
    suckers in there and it worked perfect. And they are
    cheap to get too.

    NOTE- Two wedges would slide right where the red line is
    in the photo below.

    Last edited by CALFFBOU; 12-25-2004 at 06:12 PM.

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    Default Re: Re: Wedging doors...

    Originally posted by ullrichk


    I've always got one Firestore wedge in my pocket and a handful of wooden ones. I wind up handing many wooden ones out to other firefighters who don't carry anything(!). The Firestore wedges are a bit too expensive to give away, but they work well in a variety of situations. Mark 'em or lose 'em!
    For half the price go get a 2x4 and cut some wooden wedges, I used to have firestore wedges, but the way i go through them, it wasent worth replacing them every week. Also, carry many wedges, buildings have more then one door.
    put the wet stuff on the hot stuff.

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    Default Wedges...

    gunstar34- As Ihave stated, I use both. the nice plastic one
    is great for doors and I make sure I always get it back.

    But, I love the wooden wedges too. They are nice and cheap
    and I use them for poped sprinkler heads.

    Having the plastic one is great and only cost $8.
    Last edited by CALFFBOU; 12-25-2004 at 05:56 PM.

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    Keep a roll of cloth medical tape and a pen in your turnouts. If you get re-routed to another call, you can take a piece of the tape, stick to the thigh area of your bunker pants and write down the address you are being sent to instead of asking Fire Alarm 2 or three times.

    It's also great for writing down information at any incident!
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
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    We have several Schools, and some business that the front entrance doors are the panic release (push) style from the inside. The alarm panels are located away from the front entrance making it imposible to see what area is activated. After hours school security is dispatched to let us inside, however they are usually 15-20 in arriving. I use a tool from our vehicle lock out kit place it between the space of the two doors, and pull back to release the panic bar,works great. School security always questions as to how we got in, I tell him TRICK'S OF THE TRADE. Stay Safe.

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    We have thousands of rowhouses with skylights over the stairwells. Our roof team guys always tap a few times on the side of it to warn the Engine advancing the line up the stairs that there will be a shower of glass coming soon.

    I've seen this trick a few times on doors that open inward... if forcible entry is having problems getting in, the 2 Truck guys getting ready to throw the 30' ground ladder can make waste of the door, wood or steel, by aggresively ramming it with heel end of the ladder. It won't work with iron security bars in the way though since these doors will swing outward.

    Advancing charged 2 1/2" is easier on diminshing grip strength by using a piece of webbing tied into a loop. Take a girth hitch and throw into over your shoulder or if your crawling down a hallway it's easier to pull on the webbing instead of the hose.

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    Traffic Collision (T/C) aka MVA to the East coasters- Fuel
    leaking from a line? If you cant crimp it, stick a golf tee
    in it. (I carry one in my turnout coat)

    A piece of soap rubbed over the spot will do the same, the petrol hardens the soap.
    Psychiatrists state 1 in 4 people has a mental illness.
    Look at three of your friends, if they are ok, your it.

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    Originally posted by FlyingKiwi
    Traffic Collision (T/C) aka MVA to the East coasters- Fuel
    leaking from a line? If you cant crimp it, stick a golf tee
    in it. (I carry one in my turnout coat)

    A piece of soap rubbed over the spot will do the same, the petrol hardens the soap.
    We carry wax toilet bowl sealing rings on the rigs for the same purpose. If they can stand up to the abuse of firefighter defacation and micturation, they can surely plug up a leak or two!
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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    -Vehicle fire- Cant get that damn hood to open ...
    You can also drive the pike, adz end of the Halligan, into the corner of teh hood and pry back. If the hood doesn't fold right away, you can crease the corner w/the back end of the axe. You do not need to take a Paul Bunyan swing either, you don't want to pierce the battery. This has proven to be very effective when the hood cable is burned away and you need to get some water in teh engine compartment.


    I keep a piece of webbing tucked/folded neatly under the velco knee pad, (right knee) w/a 4" loop hanging out off to the side. The loop is out of the way and it is easily accessible. The folded webbing is tuck at the bottom of the pad and doesn't get in the way when crawling.
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    BETTER TO DIE ON YOUR FEET THAN LIVE ON YOUR KNEES!

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    Default No more tricks?

    All of thricks are gone? Guess I should have titled this one-
    "Give me your leather tricks" instead?

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    Originally posted by sbfdco1


    You can also drive the pike, adz end of the Halligan, into the corner of teh hood and pry back. If the hood doesn't fold right away, you can crease the corner w/the back end of the axe. You do not need to take a Paul Bunyan swing either, you don't want to pierce the battery. This has proven to be very effective when the hood cable is burned away and you need to get some water in teh engine compartment.
    What i like to do to get to the battery, take the grill out with the halligan, and find the cable-put the cable between the forks of the halligan and twist till the hood pops (thats if you cant open from int. of the car.)
    put the wet stuff on the hot stuff.

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    Originally posted by fdsq10
    We have several Schools, and some business that the front entrance doors are the panic release (push) style from the inside. The alarm panels are located away from the front entrance making it imposible to see what area is activated. After hours school security is dispatched to let us inside, however they are usually 15-20 in arriving. I use a tool from our vehicle lock out kit place it between the space of the two doors, and pull back to release the panic bar,works great. School security always questions as to how we got in, I tell him TRICK'S OF THE TRADE. Stay Safe.

    That would be called a "J" tool.
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    Stay alert and be safe.

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    Boots soaked inside after a run and you don't have a dryer? Stuff wadded up newspaper inside and it helps dry them out much faster. Might take a few applications. Just remember to take the newspaper out before you jump back into them

    Tide
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    Default Great trick...

    I forgot about the newspaper trick. Thanks bro!

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    Just watch out if them boots is LEATHER. Cracks the leather faster than you can look at it. Also promotes excessive salting on the boots (Just as bad) by absorbing to much moisture from sweat inside the boots.

    That's why the old wives tale about soaking boots then walking in them to break them, in as just that. An old wives tale.

    Wear the new boots around the station/home, and use the old faithfulls for work, until the new boots are comfortable.

    They will last twice as long.

    (smart people have at least two sets of boots, DOH!)

    Tip no 2.

    NEVER EVER go on a bush fire without socks, did that a couple of weeks ago, bleeding blisters after 5 hours work is not funny. Some people never learn eh. Mental note to self - LEAVE A SPARE PAIR AT THE BLOODY STATION.

    Tip No 3.

    Always watch the people around you at long jobs. When they stop sweating, they need rehab - NOW. Get them replaced asap and keep them capable of working. What's the first visible sign of dehydration people.

    Tip no 4. Safety Rule No 1.

    It does not matter who gives you the order. If it is patently dangerous, and will not contribute to saving a life, with a good percentage of success. It goes in the BOLLOCKS BIN.

    Down here that is called the "Safe Person Concept" It starts when you pull the pants on, it finishes when you take them off.
    Psychiatrists state 1 in 4 people has a mental illness.
    Look at three of your friends, if they are ok, your it.

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    If you're trying to figure out how a vehicle fire started, check to see if there are remains of an oil fill cap on the valve cover or fill tube. Lot's of people forget to replace the cap, oil sprays out and ignites from exhaust manifold.

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