1. #1
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    firefighterbeau's Avatar
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    Default Extrication Class

    I need some thoughts on this, in December we are having our local Auto Extrication refresher. Due to the cold weather the class will be held inside, hands on and classroom. I personally don't like the idea cause you can only have one car at a time inside. The EMT's on our local ambulance squad don't want to stand around outside in the cold while the firefighters cut apart the cars, so for there benifit its inside. What do ya'll think about that??

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    I'd tell em to buck up, put on some thermal underwear, and get outside and get it done! Ask em when that car rolls over the hill and you got three people entrapped if they'll be able to move the car into a heated building to accomplish the extrication?

    It'd be good to have a simulated victim, too, and practice keeping them warm. We did that in the vehicle rescue class we just finished. We found that if you take your portable quartz lights on a cord reel from the generator on the truck and put it inside with the victim focused on em, it not only gives the interior rescuer better lighting to do his work, but it also generates a lotta heat.
    "Captain 1 to control, retone this as a structure and notify the fire chief...."

    Safety is no accident.

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    Why not put your extrication cars outside, and keep an "in-tact" car inside. I would break my class up into teams and send them outside two at a time (one to work, one to observe and then rotate). The remainder I would have working inside practicing basic patient removal techniques like the KED and rapid roll out scenarios. That way, you keep more people busy and you limit the amount of time everyone must spend outside exposed to the elements. I would also be a bit leary of operating tools inside the building. Especially if you have gasoline engines on the hydrailic power units that will expose your people to extra carbon monoxide.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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    Default Class

    I agree with the Spartan and metal, if you dont train like you fight its not really training. If you do a real time scenario where you have the medics active from the beginning this will keep them busy and warm. Think of having a couple of real victims, put one outside the vehicle who is ejected, put a note on him as to his problems what ever you would like, so they have to survey, c-collar, backboard, IV, load, this gives them something to do from the get go. And then have one in the vehicle, once the car is stable get a medic in the car for pt care, size up, we have them C-Collar cover pt, and talk with him (even if unconcious) Then we have them start IV's in the car while everything is going on around them. Then they ked them with assitance, backboard, load. And yes we use real IV's, we always have some people that are willing to get stuck for the cause, this gives everyone practice in this situation. And we do this in the cold, because thats what it is up here 7 months of the year.
    Where I work on the top of the world, Prudhoe Bay(next to ANWR) we have parachute's on our rescue truck to pull over the vehicle and then we put a heater trunk that is carried on one of the support vehicles and has a huge heater to pump the heat under the chute and it blows up the chute and it gets nice and toasty in there. But up there the tempartures can fall too 100 below, but are most constant about 30 below 6 months out of the year. And yes are medics up there do not like to train in that weather but then either do I
    I am interested what everyone thinks of sticking people and giving them fluids(Saline) during a drill, do you do it, do you think its wrong, probably a good thread. Let me know what you think.
    burn
    Burn<br />LT/EMT/Inst />Central Mat-Su FD<br />Wasilla Alaska

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    You have stuck IV's in during training, heck we don't use any live victims, our chief/extrication instructor thinks its too dangerous (which i know makes very little sense). I don't think theres a problem with starting an IV during training, gives the medics some practice. Also just to let everyone know we have all EMT-B's on our fire dept and ambulance.
    I never thought of the CO levels in the building as a reason not to do the training inside, besides the power unit for the tools theres an old wood burning stove that is used for the heat during the training that would produce CO. Its a pretty big building, has alot of stuff stored in it, basically its a cold storage building for the city and fire department.

    thanks for the comments so far, anymore would be appreciated!

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    We do winter training inside. Let's people concentrate more on what they are supposed to be learning than worrying about it's cold, it's windy, etc. Expose them to a learning rich environment, not a suffering environment.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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