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Thread: RIT tools

  1. #1
    Forum Member firefighter26's Avatar
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    Default RIT tools

    Now that I have scaled back some of the duties that I am responsible for, I have decided to focus on finishing up as many "in progress" projects and ideas as I can (sorta like cleaning house for the "to do" or "project" list that I have been carrying around for the last 7 years).

    Anyway, one of my ideas was setting up a RIT jump bag that contains the majority of the tools that a RIT team would use if activated. Of course, things like axes and power saws can not be stored in a jump bag, but there are many other tools that can be.

    Here is what I have so far (it isn't much of a list):
    ~ A few short lengths of rescue rope, or strapping with carabineers on both end
    ~ Flashlights/Portable spot lights
    ~ Hand tools, such as crowbars and hacksaws

    My other idea was to find a way to attach carabineers to the SCBA harness itself. Two on the back, on either side of the cylinder, and one on each shoulder strap (this serves as a double purpose because they could also be used to attach a flashlight to prior to entering the building. Digging around in your pockets for your light is never fun).

    Anyway, I was wondering if anyone else has a RIT jump bag of some kind and what tools, etc, they keep in it. Believe it or not, but I have not been able to find to much on "recommended" RIT tools, etc. (lots of people trying to sell their jump bags, but no one saying what should go in it).

    Our department doesn't run a lot of structure fires, but that is no excuse for not having a plan. However, there are a few HUGE subdivision proposals in the works, some of them spanning 100 acres or more! So there is a big potential increase in the number of fire related calls (running about 60% MVAs/Vehicle Fires right now to 2% structure fires).

    "Just because it has never happened doesn't mean you should have a plan ready to go, just in case!"
    "No one ever called the Fire Department for doing something smart..."


  2. #2
    Forum Member RyanEMVFD's Avatar
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    It sounds like a start. I also try to keep a few chemical light sticks in our kit. Aside from that you don't have much that we don't have in ours.
    NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
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    what is your departments use, with the light sticks when performing RIT? im always up for new ideas. thanks dean

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    Forum Member RyanEMVFD's Avatar
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    We'll tape them to tools, hose. Just about anything we want to leave a light for when we don't have enough flashlights.

    Also you can color code them so in the dark you know what you are grabbing. For instance red for axes, green for hoses....
    NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
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    Experts built the Titanic, amateurs built the Ark.

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    Originally posted by deanmc141
    what is your departments use, with the light sticks when performing RIT? im always up for new ideas. thanks dean
    We switched from light sticks to strobes, they last longer and are reuseable - specifically the Princeton Tec Eco Flare. It is compact and has a lanyard and clip for various deployment options. The strobe can either be set up with a red flashing bulb or a white continuous bulb. We use them indicate hazard areas, areas that need to be searched (Note: we use wedges to indicate areas that have been searched) or as land marks when searching a large area. They also act as a tool to indentify Team members and their location. We use a specific quick release system that allows the RIT FF to hang the strobes from their gear for quick deployment. With the strobes activated we can track each other in a reduced visability enviroment.

    Dale Pekel
    ffdpek@aol.com

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    Forum Member Skwerl530's Avatar
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    Default We use the RIT bags

    this is what is in ours:
    MAST device on the carrying strap
    Spare SCBA w/ EXTRA face mask set up for change over
    Utility rope w/ biners
    2 to 1 pully system
    various hand tools including wire cutters

    The other tools such as cip saw, air bags, irons, etc will be in the RIT staging area near the CP ready to deploy on a Stokes if needed.

    My suggestion is to make ssure that it doesn't get too full. You don't want to have to dig through lots of crap to get to the tool you need. Keep it clean and organized.

    Stay Safe,

    Jesse

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    Forum Member len1582's Avatar
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    All these things mentioned here are good. But the most important, as Skwerl mentioned, is a complete SCBA w/facepiece,not just a spare bottle or unit without a facepiece. If a FF is pinned under debris or has a leg through the floor and is impaled or just stuck this might not be life threatening, but if he runs out of air that is. Saying hold your breath while I change your bottle isn't going to do it. If his facepiece is on and not damaged leave it on and do a regulator change over(we use Scotts) in just 3 seconds. If it's damaged or if he ran out of air and removed it stick the new one on. We also use 1 hour bottles for out RIT. Removing a downed FF is not quick,it will take time if he is unable to walk so a 30 minute bottle might not be sufficient. If it's not in a bag and carried in,2 NONLOCKING carabiners on the frame will secure it to the shoulder straps when placed on his chest. They're only for attaching and you don't want to fight with a jammed tight 'biner in the dark so go nonlocking. I know I went on a bit. But this is the one tool that can mean success or failure in saving one of our own. As a note, this past summer we used a RIT team to assist injured FF's, and one ran out of air....Good luck,Len

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    This is what we carry (from our RIT SOG):

    ----------------------
    Minimum RIT Equipment-

    Engine 721 will contain the following equipment in the RIT Kit located in the officerís side rear compartment labeled "RIT":

    MSA Rescue Aire emergency SCBA with a full yellow carbon cylinder.
    Short TNT Tool
    25í utility rope bag
    150í rescue rope bag (rigged for Nance Drill with two (2) non-locking carabineers)
    150í search rope bag
    6 lengths of webbing Ė various sizes
    Two (2) wire cutter pliers
    6 Carabineers (locking & non locking)
    Visi-flare strobe with green and yellow lenses
    Plastic tarp to lay out equipment

    Additional equipment not carried in kit:

    Stokes basket stretcher
    Handlights
    2 portable WTFD radios
    Portable Monroe County radio when responding on mutual aid.
    Thermal Imaging Camera (if available-will be given to RIT in a MAYDAY situation regardless of who is using it or why)
    Folding attic ladder
    Facepiece compatible with MSA Rescue Aire (if responding as RIT on mutual aid)

    Based on a size-up by the RIT officer additional equipment such as power saws, etc. may be needed.

    ------------------

    Another idea I thought was great: One of our neighboring departments uses an old PASS device at the entry/egress point. In low visibility they can move toward the sound to get out. Of course, this has to be a different brand of PASS with a different sounding alarm than what members are wearing to avoid confusion.
    FTM-PTB-DTRT

  9. #9
    dazed and confused Resq14's Avatar
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    We try to travel light and fast with our initial RIT. When we practice evolutions for a single firefighter in distress, we split our team up into two groups.

    RIT 1: 2 FF's
    Goal: Locate FF in distress, evaluate air supply and supplement as needed, convert SCBA waist belt to harness, and determine best method for removal.
    Equipment: a hand tool per FF, flashlights, radios. One person has our "spare air" bag which is a 60 minute cylinder with a manifold on it allowing a complete 2nd stage with mask to be preconnected, as well as a RIT transfil hose. The other has a 200' kevlar tagline and TIC. RIT 1 may begin removal, but we encourage them to call RIT 2 to assist, and to bring in any specialized equipment if it's needed.

    RIT 2: 2+ FF's
    Goal: gather any specialized equipment, follow tag line to RIT 1, assist RIT 1 in removing FF from building.
    Equipment: a hand tool per FF, flashlights, radios. RIT 1 will advise on the need for additional equipment.

    We don't have a separate "RIT tool bag." Each member of the team has different types of shears, wire cutters, knives, webbing, carabiners, etc. If specialized equipment is needed, RIT 2 is able to quickly bring it in.

    It has been working very well in the training we've been doing for the past year. I'm not a fan of the "all-in-one" bags that have tools, rope, hardware, and an air supply. It's hard enough maneuvering the FF and air supply out of the building... no need to bulk it up. Our air supply bag is strictly for air stuff. It helps to keep it managable and streamlined.
    Last edited by Resq14; 12-18-2004 at 12:26 AM.
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    Resq14 brings up some good points.

    Our RIT bag is strictly for organizing our tools and keeping them together so they don't get used for something else. We only carry the bag as far as the RIT staging area. It doesn't go in the structure.

    We also use the two team concept that is in the IFSTA Rapid Intervention Teams book.
    FTM-PTB-DTRT

  11. #11
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    We have currently formed a RIT Team and we use a stokes basket to hold a majority of our tools. Inside the basket, we put carribeaners, two rope bags containg 100' of rope, a set of irons, a TIC camera, a Rit pack(SCBA) that we modified to fit a downed firefighter, and we also have a tarp to set all of our tools on. We have found that this makes it very easy for two people to carry and it also doesn't take very long to set up. Outside of the stokes, we carry a vent saw and a K-12, along with a jackhammer, additional lighting, and a BLS bag. It's always a good idea to ladder the structure, and at the end of the ladder we attach a mini strobe light so that it lays on the inside of the window allowing a firefighter to locate another way out of the structure.

  12. #12
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    Here is my dept sog on wat equipment will be used for rit... 4 spare bottles, irons, T.I.C, hydra-ram, medical bag, o2 kit, k-12, search bag, R.I.T scba kit, staging mat, light line,newyork hook, water can.. all this goes on the staging mat. we also have reflective covers that go on the back of our scba that say RIT so everyone knows who RIT is. The crew will also throw ground ladders to each side of the building, everyfloor and force doors etc to make clear paths for egress
    Firefighting is not just a job, its a way of life........
    IACOJ

    SORRY FELLAS, NO TIKI BAR HERE!

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    Exclamation RIT TOOLS

    All excellent ideas that probably work well for your areas. I have one idea that was given to me and my team at the academy. A rope bag with two 80'lengths of rescue rope that in the middle is knotted into a figure eight on a bight. A large ladder carabiner is placed in the bight to be attached to an SCBA for removal of the downed firefighter. Then every 18 to 22 inches a simple knot is tied in the four 39' lengths to aid in pulling the firefighter through a hole with four rescuers, 2 search and 2rescue RIT members. It seems to work faster and easier than a 2-1 mechanical when picking out of a hole. 4 lifters a quarter of the weight to each. Try it it's rope.

  14. #14
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    Default RIT packs

    Here's what we carry in our RIT packs:

    An Interspiro 4500 psi scba w/face mask

    wire cutters

    Sav-A-Jake multi purpose rescue tool for firefighter removal

    200' Kevlar rope detachable from bag for search line

    Flashlight & LED on bag clipped on top of mask pocket for quick identification in near zero visibility conditions

    We have found that a streamlined RIT pack setup with detachable rope bag has been very firefighter friendly. The RIT team does carry their irons and thermal camera, so we keep the bag light. Having a few tools that to a lot of things is helpful. Works great.

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    WTFD do i understand that you leave knots in ur rope for the Nance Drill? Isnt that bad for ropes to leave knots in them?
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  16. #16
    Forum Member maximumflow's Avatar
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    Default rit tools

    hey guys
    this has to be the best conversation yet! my co. responds fast/rit to three surrounding towns and like the latter rit teams we also found lite with the right equip. is quicker uses less energy from the teams and makes for a safer response.we also use fast team training members to set up our staging area so the team leader can do his size up and regular team members can stage asap with the essential tools to respond.our initial stageff-1 is with a rit pack with scba and mask,strobe light, wire cutters,14" bolt cutters 50'of 3/8 braded rope in a home made bag (budget)ff-2 one cutters edge vent saw 20" ff-3 one water can(2.5 gal)and TL the irons. the rest is staged carried in by reeves stretcher.we stage equipment based on type of structure most guys carry small tools in bunker gear. 4 men 1st team 2 2nd teamwe also utilize fast team trainers for cutting window sills to floors to make doorways(sound the floor area so as not to cut any ff's) to shorten travel time out and ladder 2nd floor windows.if you train as close to the real deal you can narrow down what tools you really need! (use your imagination it saves time and money) and you will get the job done . hope you never have to use it!!!!!
    ps if you get a chance have a ff lay face down at the bottom of a window in full ppe and have 2 men in full ppe pick him up and pass him out the window. good luck
    helping people,
    it's what we do!
    capt.Dennis
    Last edited by maximumflow; 02-27-2005 at 09:05 PM.

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    I am a recent member of the firefighter brotherhood; I have been in EMS for about 20 years now. When I joined my company, I was able to utilize many of the skills I learned over the years. Although I do not have the years of experience, I am part of the RIT team for my department. Many of the tools that we have are the normal tools that are carried on most apparatus.
    -We donít have a Stokes Stretcher to carry tools and the injured, but we do have a Reeves stretcher that accomplishes the same task.
    -We donít have a universal SCBA with a manifold, but since our mutual aid communities use the same SCBA as we do, we packaged one of our extra SCBAs in a bag that has a Medium sized mask, a Carabiner, and a strobe.
    -Utility rope is used as the tagline and it is in a backpack.
    -A salvage cover is our staging tarp.

    When we utilize the tagline I just recently came up with a retractable personal tagline. I have three large dogs and we have the retractable leashes. The leash has 20 feet of line that is automatically retracted when I return to the point of origin. In the past I used a piece of 20 foot webbing, but found that I had to gather it up when I was returning to the main line. And itís small enough to carry in my bunker pants. Now I know itís not a perfect piece of equipment but has worked pretty good so far.
    Good luck with getting the gear bag set up.
    Look before you cut.
    Rich (but poor)

  18. #18
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    Default thanks for the info, how about.....

    very excellent thread, we are working on improving our F.A.S.T.(always and ongoing, of course), like several of these ideas. Just got edition of EF&P and saw ad for 'The Firemaxx Tool' - anyone have any hands on with this?? Looks interesting, especially like the O ring in case of need for baling out a window, of course we are going to have at least two egress points and will 'never' need to do that..... looks very adaptable and utilitarian, but looks can be decieving. All input aprechiated, appreciated, oh heck thankfully acknowleged.... BE SAFE.
    (should now be CharlieRFD,past,Pres.), but I've had this screen name for so long, I'm keeping it..., besides I'm Deputy Chief now.
    BE SAFE OUT THERE
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  19. #19
    Forum Member Station2Capt's Avatar
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    same basics as everyone else here our RIT packs and SOP consist of.
    1. spare 60 min.bottle with facepiece
    2. 150' search rope with 2 D-rings
    3. small strobe lite
    4. flashlight (spare everyone carries a dept. Issue)
    5. small assortment of tools(cutters, plires, etc)
    6. Spare battery for portable (this is changed every morning)
    7. Team will also assemble other tools such as Axe, TNT, TIC
    8. after assembly of RIT Area (Away from IC and Rehab) we do a 360 of building noting all exits and general layout of structure. Min of 3 personal assigned to RIT (No exceptions)
    A "Good" fire is not measured by how big it is, but by the fact that everyone is going home safe, and that we possibly learned something new about firefighting. Member:IACOJ

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    I see these ads on firehouse for those bags with the bottles and masks. If your company has a firefighter down do u switch masks if its good or switch the bottle. We were taught if the mask is good to just switch the bottle.
    "Let's Roll." Todd Beamer 9/11 first soldier in the war on terror

    "I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America. And to the republic for which it stands ONE NATION UNDER GOD indivisible,with liberty, and justice for all.

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