Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21
  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber arhaney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Wren, MS Until the forum gremlins pay a visit!
    Posts
    1,448

    Default Portable Monitor

    Our rural fire department currently has no portable or fixed monitor on any of our trucks, I need to convince my fellow board members on the need that we have for one of these. I am looking for suggestions in two areas:
    1. Any ideas on "selling points for the other board members.

    2. Your exp. with what is available on the market. Blitzfire, Akron , POK etc.

    I'm currently thinking that a single 2.5" inlet is what we will need. Water is not crucial, we can leave the station with 1000 on the first out pumper, 3200 on the next out tanker, 3500 on tanker #2 plus two more older pumpers and a 6 X 6 with 1000 gallons.
    Last edited by arhaney; 11-15-2004 at 11:16 PM.
    Chief
    Wren Volunteer Fire Department
    IACOJ
    Southern Division

    http://www.wrenfiredepartment.4t.com/

    In Memory of:
    FireFighter/Pilot James Archer
    1946-2005
    "Rest in peace James, you now have the ultimate set of wings on you."

    Thanks, LeuitEFDems


  2. #2
    Forum Member SpartanGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    489

    Default

    We have an Akron Mercury quick attack monitor. It's on the back of Engine #2(and we're getting another one for Engine 1)

    It's preconnected to 100' of 2.5" line. You hold the monitor against your chest, shoulder the hose, and go. With practice, it takes about 30 seconds to have it out and ready. One word to the pump operator and you've got 500GPM flow with either a stack tip or an adjustable fog nozzle(Our's has a fog nozzle).

    It's great. We used it the week after we put it in service at a strip mall fire. Came in as a fire alarm, we got multiple calls while en route. Engine 2 (1996 Pierce Dash with 2000 GPM pump and 1000 gallon tank) was first on scene. There was fire blowing out of the windows of the store when the monitor was pulled off and set up.

    In a little less then a minute from the truck stopping, fire was darkened down enough that a hand line was being stretched in and Engine 1 was completing the suppply lay. It saved the strip mall, and saved us a lot of effort in my opinion.

    The one thing we've used it most for has been large tractor trailer and barn fires, as well. We run a lot of tractor trailer fires, and it's been great for quick and effective knock downs there. We only run mutual aid for barn fires, but we're auto-call for a neighboring township that gets them a lot out in the stix. Since we only run it at about 500GPM, it offers a great stream and an effective kick in the fire's *** for little water.

    As you've laid out, you have MORE than enough water coming to run it effectively for the amount of time it takes to accomplish a knock down and make the hoseteam's job a tad bit easier.
    Last edited by SpartanGuy; 11-16-2004 at 12:14 AM.
    "Captain 1 to control, retone this as a structure and notify the fire chief...."

    Safety is no accident.

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rural Iowa
    Posts
    3,106

    Default

    We are at the same point as you. New truck is 1st we have had with vehicle mount monitor capability. Post above discussed the attack size/type monitors which are ground mount only. Flow up to about 500gpm/

    What do you want it to do? Just ground mount for exposures and ext attack? Or operate from vehicle (or ground mount) on big jobs.
    I wrote Fire Grant for monitor for vehicle or ground use so now shopping for same.

    Vehicle top mount monitors are going to be 1000gpm+. To flow that kind of water in ground mount you're not going to use 1x 2.5". Such bases are multi 2.5" or LDH. We likely are going with 5" storz ground mount as also can use the LDH for supply as required.

  4. #4
    dazed and confused Resq14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,993

    Default

    One vote for TFT's Blitzfire.

    Safe, easy, relatively light. I'd equip every truck with one. We have two for now. Each is preconnected to 2.5".
    God Bless America!Remember all have given some, but some have given all.
    Google Is Your Friend™Helpful forum tip - a "must see" if you're new here
    Click this to search FH Forums!

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber arhaney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Wren, MS Until the forum gremlins pay a visit!
    Posts
    1,448

    Default

    neiowa, we intend to use it only for ground mount operations. We normally only 8 to 10 fireman on any given day and I beleive that it would be a huge help when needing big water on a fire. We have deployed 2.5" handlines before and I think that we all know how much manpower that they eat up.
    Chief
    Wren Volunteer Fire Department
    IACOJ
    Southern Division

    http://www.wrenfiredepartment.4t.com/

    In Memory of:
    FireFighter/Pilot James Archer
    1946-2005
    "Rest in peace James, you now have the ultimate set of wings on you."

    Thanks, LeuitEFDems

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Lakes Region of NH
    Posts
    344

    Default

    We use a variety of truck, aerial and ground guns but the most versatile and easy to deploy big water from is our Blitzfires with 150' of 3" preconnected to them. THey give big punch and are great for setting and forgetting to cover an exposure, etc.
    Proud to be an American, Union Firefighter!

  7. #7
    Forum Member SpartanGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    489

    Default

    arhaney,
    I understand your manpower concerns. In the daytime, we have an engine with a crew of four, and at times, that's been it for the first 10 minutes. I can tell you that with some basic practice, 1 man can deloy a preconnected portable monitor all by his lonesome. It's not as easy as say, using two or three guys to do it, but it can and has been done. It simply takes some basic training for your guys on how to deploy it and set it up so it can function by itself. We have a fog nozzle on our Akron, which holds a good reaching stream with lower pressure and flow, and still packs a wallop.

    Our Akron Quick Attack Monitor was bought by a plastics manufacturer in our area to help bolster our heavy fire attack capability. You might want to see if there are any industries(I know you're rural) that might be interested in helping you pay for it. It's always easier to convince the guys to spend money when they're only paying for half of it, or if the department is getting reimbursed fully.
    "Captain 1 to control, retone this as a structure and notify the fire chief...."

    Safety is no accident.

  8. #8
    Forum Member MetalMedic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    The Home of Smucker's Jelly
    Posts
    1,266

    Default

    Item #1 - Selling points
    - I believe you get credit from ISO for having a rig that is equipped with a high flow appliance

    Item #2 - Experience
    - I have always like the Akron Brass Apollo set-up the best
    Last edited by MetalMedic; 11-18-2004 at 11:19 PM.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Baldwin Co., Alabama
    Posts
    129

    Thumbs up Good for man power

    I don't know if you have seen the Elkhart R.A.M (Rapid Attack Monitor) You can set it up with one person easily. I could be wrong but it think the rep told us at the demo that you can flow 1000gpm at 50psi. It'll produce a stream about 100yds (with the stack tips)

    Here's a link:

    http://www.elkhartbrass.com/ebmain.c...mn&prod_type=r

    Takes one 2.5 line and you can get them with stack tips or fog nozzle.
    Last edited by loxfire16; 11-17-2004 at 08:24 PM.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Dalmatian90's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,120

    Default

    I could be wrong but it think the rep told us at the demo that you can flow 1000gpm at 50psi.

    Takes one 2.5 line and you can get them with stack tips or fog nozzle.


    There's lies.
    Damn lies.
    And Fire Equipment Salesmen.

    You'd need 200 to 250psi pump discharge to get 1000gpm through only 100' of 2.5"

    On the end of that, you'd need a 2-1/4" tip.

    Which would have a nozzle reaction of 397 pounds.

    That's not a scenario I'd like to see in one of these quick attack monitors! That's a lot of reaction force to handle -- enough if you're on pavement you could see a teenage firefighter or two taking a ride.

    What I have observed from drills and fireground is with a big supply line (4" or 5") behind them, the monitors don't tend to move, especially when on dirt. When we feed even a fairly modest flow like 500gpm but through a smaller line like 50' of 2.5", and on pavement to boot, the suckers want to take off like a rocket.

    Just something to consider -- the light lines are great for attack, but if you're setting up for the long-term and want to leave the monitor unattended, the LDH gives you more inherintent stability.

    If we take the scenario above, you have 400# of nozzle reaction.
    100' of 2.5" hose, charged, weighs about 200#, 4" comes in at 550#, and 5" will have 850# behind that monitor. Yeah, a lot more physics become involved like who many feet a straight behind the monitor, etc...but it's pretty clear the heavier the supply line, the more work the monitor would need to do to "break loose" (and as a corrolary, the less you need to rely on a safety chain and/or a FF manning the gun)
    IACOJ Canine Officer
    20/50

  11. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    5

    Default

    We have used the Blitz Fire for a couple of years and love it. But we have water mains and hydrants. I'm not sure tankers could handle the flow. I agree with Dalmation90 that 500gpm is much more realistic. But even at that flow your largest tanker would be emptied in under 7 minutes. That could have an adverse effect on all operations going on at the fire scene. You will need to keep that in mind before deploying it.

  12. #12
    dazed and confused Resq14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,993

    Default

    Originally posted by Dalmatian90
    [B When we feed even a fairly modest flow like 500gpm but through a smaller line like 50' of 2.5", and on pavement to boot, the suckers want to take off like a rocket. [/B]
    Do you carry or have you used a Blitzfire, Dal?
    God Bless America!Remember all have given some, but some have given all.
    Google Is Your Friend™Helpful forum tip - a "must see" if you're new here
    Click this to search FH Forums!

  13. #13
    MembersZone Subscriber arhaney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Wren, MS Until the forum gremlins pay a visit!
    Posts
    1,448

    Default

    Seems like most departments around here seem to be using the blitzfire. As far as water concerns go, I don't think that we will have a problem. We have a 4,000 gallon drop tank a 3,000 gallon drop tank and 7,700 gallons in 3 tankers, good strong hydrants so water supply isn't really a concern. Any body used the new POK monitor?
    Chief
    Wren Volunteer Fire Department
    IACOJ
    Southern Division

    http://www.wrenfiredepartment.4t.com/

    In Memory of:
    FireFighter/Pilot James Archer
    1946-2005
    "Rest in peace James, you now have the ultimate set of wings on you."

    Thanks, LeuitEFDems

  14. #14
    Senior Member Dalmatian90's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,120

    Default

    No we don't Resq14. We have two conventional monitors with 350-750 and 350-1000gpm fog nozzles -- usually used in the low end of that range. "Bomb Line" mode would have the one our attack truck fed with 3". Each have a stack on the supply side of 2.5"-4"-5" so they can be fed by whatever line is stretched to feed them.

    I like the Blitzfires, and I know they shut themselves off. Wouldn't mind it, but the cheap New England Yankee in me comes out everytime I look at the price and remember there's only be once in 17 years I've seen us use a monitor to make an attack (not just a surround-and-drown).
    Last edited by Dalmatian90; 11-18-2004 at 01:32 PM.
    IACOJ Canine Officer
    20/50

  15. #15
    dazed and confused Resq14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,993

    Default

    In addition to the auto shutdown feature, they are incredibly stable. In my experience, the only surface they seem skiddish on is smooth concrete like you'd find in the apparatus bay. On other smooth surfaces though, the flow of water is designed to drive the carbide spikes downward. The large arms also make for a stable base. The shutdown feature is VERY sensitive. You can kick the monitor over while flowing hundreds of gpms and it will gently-but-quickly shutdown.

    When you're shorthanded (and who isn't these days) you can lob a tremendous amount of water (or CAF as we do) with minimal staffing, and do it in a safe manner FAST... even in a structure. We haven't done that yet, though. Our fire prevention activities are very successful as of late, which is good!

    No doubt about it though, they are $$$.
    Last edited by Resq14; 11-18-2004 at 02:57 PM.
    God Bless America!Remember all have given some, but some have given all.
    Google Is Your Friend™Helpful forum tip - a "must see" if you're new here
    Click this to search FH Forums!

  16. #16
    MembersZone Subscriber arhaney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Wren, MS Until the forum gremlins pay a visit!
    Posts
    1,448

    Default

    Resq14, when the Blitzfire shutdown activates, do you close the valve and then turn it back on to reset? Also, which nozzle do you use on it?
    Chief
    Wren Volunteer Fire Department
    IACOJ
    Southern Division

    http://www.wrenfiredepartment.4t.com/

    In Memory of:
    FireFighter/Pilot James Archer
    1946-2005
    "Rest in peace James, you now have the ultimate set of wings on you."

    Thanks, LeuitEFDems

  17. #17
    Forum Member spearsm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Lowndes, MS USA
    Posts
    742

    Default I might be able to answer that.....

    Yes. You close the nozzle and then reopen. I might need to get ours checked out, but ours don't "gently" shut down, it almost slams shut. It is designed to close if it lifts off the ground. Our facility pressure is 150 or better at the hydrants. That in itself probably gives it a reason to slam.
    We have a combination nozzle with the osilator option. I bought it for the very reason of not needing so many people to get it set up.
    Do I like it? Very much so.
    YGBSM!
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.

    If all you have is a hammer, then your problems start to look like nails.
    ___________________

    IACOJ
    Southern Division.

  18. #18
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    421

    Default

    We have the TFT Blitzfire on all four of our engines. One of the best investments we made. All four are set up with the fog nozzle, but we also have the stacked tips there and ready to be used if needed.

    The safety feature is set up so that when the nozzle moves more than the sweep it is designed for, it shuts down. So, if it starts skidding, or tips over, it is shut down.
    -Bozz

    Air Force Medic

  19. #19
    MembersZone Subscriber arhaney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Wren, MS Until the forum gremlins pay a visit!
    Posts
    1,448

    Default

    Spearsm, how are things in Lowndes County? Did you order your Blitzfire through Tupelo Fire Equipment?
    Chief
    Wren Volunteer Fire Department
    IACOJ
    Southern Division

    http://www.wrenfiredepartment.4t.com/

    In Memory of:
    FireFighter/Pilot James Archer
    1946-2005
    "Rest in peace James, you now have the ultimate set of wings on you."

    Thanks, LeuitEFDems

  20. #20
    Forum Member spearsm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Lowndes, MS USA
    Posts
    742

    Thumbs up

    Things are good. Last one was a "picker" fire near the house, otherwise slow..but that is a good thing.
    Yes sir. We bought it through TF. They brought one out for me to "sample" for a while to see if that would fit the bill. I really like it.
    YGBSM!
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.

    If all you have is a hammer, then your problems start to look like nails.
    ___________________

    IACOJ
    Southern Division.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts