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Thread: door chocks

  1. #1
    Forum Member HeavyRescueTech's Avatar
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    Default door chocks

    ok, I know this is a stupid topic, but I need some help from the seasoned vets.

    I need to get myself two new door chocks. right now the ones I have are too thin, and fall over easily .

    here is what I am looking for in a chock:
    1) something that is stable, and won't fall down when stood upright.
    2) it needs to be able to hold open any door with various clearences
    3) it needs to be made of wood, and as such disposable and cheap to replace

    if possible, please post the dimensions (LxWxH) of what you recommend/use.
    If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

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  2. #2
    Forum Member CaptOldTimer's Avatar
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    Lightbulb

    Hey Dr.P,


    Not stupid Pal.

    What are you trying to do with them, beside chock open a door or window?


    I have used wooden chocks made from pine 2 X 2's cut at 45 degrees and 4 to 6 inches long, for a long time. Cheap! If you leave them and most time you do, it doesn't break your wallet. You can carry several of them in your coat pocket or if you are one that likes to stick them under a rubber banding on you helmet you can carry some there as well.

    You can get several 6' or 8' pieces at the lumber yard and make a bunch of them. If you are in a large department that has a cabinet or wood shop, they probably have a bucket or two of them already cut.


    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

    Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

  3. #3
    Forum Member HeavyRescueTech's Avatar
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    Default

    basicly just to chock open a door. we were given sprinkler wedges as well, but they aren't tall enough (maybe 1 inch tall at the most) to be effective at chocking doors.

    I plan on keeping one or two on my helmet, and maybe another one or two somewhere in my gear.

    which is better, to have them longer and a less steep angle, or have them shorters, steeper, but less of a chance of them getting caught on something?

    also, how do you chock open a window? wouldn't a 6 inch door chock be ineffective in keeping it open to allow for adequate ventalation?
    If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

    FF/EMT/DBP

  4. #4
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Default Yo..

    Ok, I know you said "wwod only", but this is all I can offer.

    I love the "Wedge-It" from the Fire Store. After looking at
    their site, I see some other wedges.

    Maybe this will help. Here is your link-

    http://www5.thefirestore.com/store/category.cfm?cID=21

  5. #5
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Default Oh yeah...

    I carry wood chalks too. To plug up an activated sprinkler
    head. Well, I finally got to do it and it worked.

    I guess we have to remember not to make them so big. I dont
    have any size dementions. But I am figuring a good size is
    around 2-3 inches height, 3-4 inches length and 1 inch
    wide.

    Guessing only.

  6. #6
    dazed and confused Resq14's Avatar
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    Default Re: Yo..

    Originally posted by CALFFBOU
    I love the "Wedge-It"
    Ditto. Very handy for EMS runs. Also have to second carrying some cheap-o wooden ones for interior work. Easier and cheaper to carry several wooden ones, and don't need to worry about getting them back.

    For windows, I guess you're doing it for non-destructive ventilation? Use something in the occupancy. Or throw a chinup bar/smoke ejector holder in place. I've never heard of using a door chock to keep a window open... does anyone do this, and if so how?
    Last edited by Resq14; 11-16-2004 at 01:56 PM.
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  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber Firefighter430's Avatar
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    Default

    DID SOMEBODY ONCE MENTION PUTTING NAILS IN THE CHOCK FOR STORAGE. I SAW THIS ON A POST OR IN A MAG OR AT A FIRE SCHOOL. DON'T KNOW HOW WELL THIS WOULD WORK WITH GLOVES ON. ANYWAY DON'T CARRY ROUND NAILS MYSELF. HAVE A FEW "CUT" NAILS LOOSE IN MY POCKET. SIZE OF CHOCK SHOULD WORK WELL ANYWAY. YOU CAN CUT 4 OUT OF A LENGTH OF 2X4 BASED ON THE SIZE AND ANGLE ON THE ONE SHOWN.
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    Last edited by Firefighter430; 11-16-2004 at 02:55 PM.
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  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber ullrichk's Avatar
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    Default

    If you raise a window sash you can wedge the upper and lower apart slightly with a door chock. (Longer and thinner works better here.) The pressure of each sash against the window frame keeps the window open. Not my first choice for holding windows open, but it's nondestructive.

    If you are near a construction site where wooden stakes are being driven for concrete forms, batter boards, or for some other purpose you can literally come up with buckets full of chocks for free. When the 2x4s are cut to a point for driving, 2 chocks are left over. Just cull the ones that don't have a suitable shape or angle.
    ullrichk
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  9. #9
    Forum Member CaptOldTimer's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    I forgot to tell you about the nails to put in double hung windows to keep them up.

    In my area, there are a lot of old buildings with the old style double hung windows with the iron weights hidden in the sides of the sashes. The window wedges and or nails keep these bad boys from coming back down.

    Like ullrichk said go by a construction site, you can get some good wedges.
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

    Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

  10. #10
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Default Yo...

    Originally posted by CaptOldTimer
    I forgot to tell you about the nails to put in double hung windows to keep them up.

    In my area, there are a lot of old buildings with the old style double hung windows with the iron weights hidden in the sides of the sashes. The window wedges and or nails keep these bad boys from coming back down.
    Capt- I wish you had a picture of this. I would love to see it.
    Maybe you could post this idea in the "tricks" thread?"

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