Thread: How to prepare

  1. #1
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    Default How to prepare

    HOW DO SOME OF YOU FOLKS PREPARE FOR CPAT'S. ME PERSONALLY I'M ABLE 2 BENCH WELL OVER 300LBS AND SQUAT OVER 400LBS. BUT IVE FOUND THAT THAT'S NOT ENOUGH TO GET THROUGH THE TORTURE THESE TYPE OF TESTS.

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    check out this website- they have a good work out on it specifically for the CPAT
    www.ci.mesa.az.us/fire/firecpat

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    Default Physical Agility

    BUT IVE FOUND THAT THAT'S NOT ENOUGH TO GET THROUGH THE TORTURE THESE TYPE OF TESTS.
    You're right!

    Physical Agility, CPAT, Biddle What Ever

    Often, candidates don't realize that it's not just strength in the physical agility. The "Nugget " is technique, momentum and grip. If you are uncertain or having problems in the physical, take advantage of any college or academy programs to learn the techniques to practice pulling hose, throwing a ladder, dragging a dummy (not you), etc. Many departments offer practice "run-through" sessions for their physical test prior to the actual date of testing. Don't pass up this opportunity.

    You don’t want any surprises during the physical agility. You need to have practiced hands on with every segment of the agility. Too many candidates think they are in great shape. One who did not take advantage of the practice session told me, “Hey, that 75 pound hose pack was heavy. Humping that hose bundle up the tower, hosting and other manipulative skills, then back down the tower steps made my lungs burn (they were still burning days later) and caused the loss of valuable seconds.” The best way to train for this event is to up the cardio by going up and down bleachers with a backpack with weights or a weighted vest from www.WeightVest.com

    In those areas of concern, work with a trainer at a gym in those fields of motion that would improve your ability. Often fire training divisions know the exercises that would apply to those areas. When ice skaters were trying to break the record for a triple lux, they found by working on upper body strength was the secret.

    You can learn more about physical agility training from www.firefightersworkout.com

    Check in with your local area department and arrange to go by for a little coaching. What firefighter wouldn't want to puff out their chest showing his or her special techniques that got them their job or help on the fire ground. One of our candidates was losing sleep over the uncertainty of not being able to throw a ladder. These fears were put to rest after visiting a local fire department that showed the needed technique.

    With ladder throws, it's gaining momentum and a continuous movement from beginning to end of the throw, using a pivot point and the weight of the ladder to your advantage. Dragging hose or a dummy is starting with a thrust to start up the momentum, taking shorter steps, keeping a low forward center of gravity, using your own weight to keep up the momentum during the pull.

    Walking a ladder is using a pivot point and the weight of the ladder to your advantage. When raising the fly, pull the rope in short hand over hand movements in front of your face not much higher than your head. On each grip of the rope, turn your fist palm down to improve your grip. Keep one foot planted at the spur (bottom one side or the other) keep the other foot back for balance. Slightly tilt the ladder towards the wall for balance as you raise it.

    The dummy from my son's department disappeared from the training center. Two days later a 911 call came in from a pay phone asking for help. When units arrived at the scene, here was the dummy standing up in the phone booth with the phone receiver to his ear. Case closed.

    Many candidates feel if they set some kind of a record it will help in hiring. Not true! It is pass or fail. The secret "Nugget" here is to pace yourself. You don't have to break the record. If you would have no problem in passing the physical, then, why would you want to try and impress the training staff, the other candidates and tout that you set a new record? In your haste, you might injure yourself or fall down the stairs in the tower . . . and, you don't even pass. Now, you not only didn't pass the PT, you're out of the hiring process. How would you feel McFly?

    Here are some valuable tips for CPAT from Tom Dominguez and Reed Norwood:

    The secret to passing the CPAT is to be in shape with a high cardiovascular fitness level and to know the techniques as Captain Bob has mentioned. The average time is between nine minutes and ten minutes, twenty seconds. Try to think of the CPAT (or any agility) as a marathon where you are trying to complete the event instead of going for the record time. You can burn out if you are going for time no matter how well in shape you are.

    Most people who fail the CPAT fail the first event (Stair Climb/Stair Stepper), or run out of time during the last event (Ceiling Breach). People who run out of time at the breach and pull lost a few seconds at all the prior event stations because they PAUSED to THINK of how to do the event or PAUSED or SLOWED down to catch their breath.

    #1 Stair Climb: No matter how hard you train for the stair stepper, your legs are going to be like rubber after you get off the machine and start pulling hose. The recovery time for rubber legs depends on your fitness. Even still, rubber legs or not, you have to get moving and keep moving, and stay moving! If you stop at anytime during the events, the clock is ticking and you are losing time.

    The tendency is that as you start wearing down on the stair stepper machine, your pace and stride will change and that will affect your balance. As you lose your balance, you start to wobble and the momentum of the weight on your body increases the swaying. As the distance of the sway increases, you will make a natural grab for the handrails. Grab the rail (more than twice?) to many times and you are disqualified. Instead of "grabbing the rail", use the back of your hand and push your self back. Adjusting your stance and concentrating will help you avoid the "wobble". Just like wearing a SCBA, you also have to concentrate on your breathing.

    More on the CPAT here http://cms.firehouse.com/content/art...nId=8&id=28852

    "Nothing counts 'til you have the badge . . . Nothing!"

    Fire "Captain Bob" Author, Becoming A Firefighter

    www.eatstress.com

    888-238-3959

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    Talking

    CARDIO! CARDIO! CARDIO! I to thought strength was the answer, I used to lift weights 5-day's a week for 2 hours a session, I was bench pressing 330lbs, but I was watching all these skinny little runners blow by me. Don't get me wrong strength is very important, but it sounds like your strong enough so now work on your endurance. Run sprints, run hills run on treadmills and run STAIRS, STAIRS, STAIRS,
    and work your way up untill you can run stairs comfortably while wearing a 50lb vest. It will take some time to get used to, but trust me it will get easier. Cardio, leg strength and technique are the key's. Good luck.

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    Default I agree

    Cardio is definitely the way to go. A healthy heart is the start to a healthy body. Agility for firefighters is key, it is essential that you do cardio and low impact routines to maximize effectiveness. We also have some fighter preparing with Pilates, but they also get teased for it!

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    Like everybody else said, cardio! Check this website out http://www.crossfit.com/. A buddy of mine said it was some good stuff and kicks his butt everytime he does it. I personally haven't done it yet so I can't give personal expierence, but from what he says, it may be worth a try.
    Knowledge is the difference between KNOWING and GUESSING

    "You guys are good, but you'll never invent anything-it's all been done before."

    FF/EMT-IV (medic in training)

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    Getting a little of subject, but had a question, i used to do a lot of cleans and deadlifts for football back in highschool, my question is would these two excerises benefit me now as well training for the cpat, and if so which sections would they fall better in obviously deadlifts/ legs, cleans upperbody or legs? Thanks in advance

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    Deadlifts would benefit you for sure in the CPAT. Especially when dragging that dummy. And Deadlifts help improve your grip, so that would help in pretty much every event. But Deadlifts are important for overall fitness, not just getting through the CPAT.

    Any exercise that requires you to grab and lift something heavy, be it deadlifts, squats, cleans, bench press, would be a huge benefit as a firefighter and should be included in any training program.

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    crossfit is the way to go.
    here's a routine I made up, crossfit style:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xzwb1PMbdjQ

    something like this is great overall workout, cardio and strength at the same time.

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    Default Testing

    I have to agree with the cardio. Remember what our job deals with. You get toned out, heart rate goes up. Get in the truck, hit the hydrant moving 5 inch hose by yourself, (to hit the hydrant) then pulling a hose going up possibly 2 flights of stairs (residential) or more (commercial) with gear, pack, tools, hose, (easy 150lbs +). And at this point you really havent even started to work yet, because you are only at the fire floor you did not force entry on the 2nd floor, take out the double pain(spelling sorry) windows that are back breaking, make a hit on the fire or find anyone yet. So far the mose you lift was approx 150- 200lbs not 300-500, but your heart rate and you , even for excellent response time have been working at max for say 15 minutes at this time. Now you have to make a knock on the fire, find the victim , possibly move couches/furniture for this, then take the 200lbs victim unresponsive + your tools,gear, and your self (extra 300lbs for the person who is 200lbs) back outside, in 500 degree conditions. which may be another 5-10 work. Now you have been working then you do even when you are sprinting on a treadmil, in 500degree conditions with double to tripple your body weight for 20 or so minutes and that is at optimal times saying that you only are making 1 entry/rescue and not doing anything after that. So when you can bench press 500lbs 3-4 times and thats it, and then only work at your maximum for 5-10 minutes, thats clearly not good enough shape for fire fighting, therefore you need the balance of weights and CARDIO. Also, wieghts alone will not save you from a heart attack but cardio shape will help prevent a heart attack , which is a leading killer of ff's.

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    And did I mention that all the Crossfit info is FREE!!!!!
    They're not trying to sell ya anything.
    No programs, no books or DVD's.
    Just a bunch of kickass workout ideas.

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    bit of a random question, but kind of related to everything..

    does or has anybody else here train/trained with using a SCBA mask without air?

    if so, did you notice better results than when not using one?

    iv seen videos of people using them, but i am unsure of if it has actually any benefit at all?

    - Dave

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    Quote Originally Posted by KiwiFireBuff View Post
    bit of a random question, but kind of related to everything..

    does or has anybody else here train/trained with using a SCBA mask without air?

    if so, did you notice better results than when not using one?

    iv seen videos of people using them, but i am unsure of if it has actually any benefit at all?

    - Dave
    I thought about trying a workout with an SCBA mask on after seeing UFC fighter Wanderlei Silva go through a pretty tough workout with his nostrils tape shut and only breath through a snorkel (I wouldn't go that far, I've still got to show up to the CPAT in one piece!)

    Here is a video of Wanderlei training with the snorkel on:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ygoQeNifI9M

    Most of the exercises he does in the training video are probably very beneficial to firefighters.

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    Take a look at the workout video I posted a few spots above.
    Working out with SCBA on is great training; it is harder than just workout clothes, and it teaches you how long a 30 minute cylinder actually lasts when really working.

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    crossfit, crossfit crossfit!..best workout for our career field, no doubt about it. You can do most of the workouts on your own, but if your really want the full benefit of crossfit, find a CF gym near you...Im happy to say, Im a crossfit addict!

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    Default Run/Walk

    Do some cardo. If you cannot run 3 miles in under 30min, start walk/running and work yourself up.

    TRUST ME, this will work

    If you can lift the weight and can run 3 miles with under 10 min miles, you will be fine.

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