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  1. #1
    FIREMAN 1st GRADE E40FDNYL35's Avatar
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    Default Another F D N Y story...

    December 1, 2004 -- Army reservist Dan Swift saved another soldier's life and then went to help fellow city firefighter Chris Engeldrum when a car bomb ripped apart their Humvee outside Baghdad.
    "I tried to help, but I lost consciousness," the 24-year-old firefighter told his buddies in a phone call to Ladder Company 43 in East Harlem yesterday.
    Swift, a 24-year-old bachelor, also called his mom, Kate Daly, in upstate Carmel. "My son called to let me know he was injured," she told The Post. "He told me his Humvee blew up . . . I didn't know if he was missing a limb or what." He told her that after he got out of the gutted Humvee, he couldn't see with one eye. But he tried to help others — knowing that Iraqi rebels usually follow up car bomb attacks by opening fire on the survivors. "He told me he saved someone's life," Daly said. "Although he was all covered in blood, when he saw [another] man was blue, he stood up and he opened his airway." Swift was an EMT before he joined the Fire Department three years ago, and was working as a medic in Baghdad at the time of the Monday attack, she said. Daly said her son, a member of Company A of the 69th Mechanized Infantry — the famed Fighting 69th — told her he had shrapnel in his leg and face and could end up losing an eye. When she heard that, she said, "My knees got weak . . . it was just horrible. But my son kept saying, 'Mom, even if I lose an eye, I'm grateful. At least I'm alive.' "He was like 'Mom, two of them didn't make it.' He was just so sad, you could hear it in his voice."
    At Ladder Co. 43 — known as "El Barrio's Bravest" — Capt. Kerry Hollywood described "Swifty" as "a good kid and enthusiastic firefighter." "He's banged up and on his way to Germany for treatment," he said. "That's all we know. It's frustrating not knowing how badly he's injured." Swift kept in touch with his fellow smoke-eaters, phoning the firehouse from Iraq every few weeks, said pal John Davies, who was a probie with Swift. "He was nervous [about going to Iraq] but he knew that was his job to do," Davies said.
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************


  2. #2
    FIREMAN 1st GRADE E40FDNYL35's Avatar
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    Wednesday, December 1st, 2004 - The war in Iraq claimed the life of another member of the FDNY family over the holiday weekend.
    U.S. Army Pvt. Brian Grant, the 31-year-old son of a retired Staten Island firefighter, was killed Friday when he came under sniper attack in the city of Ramadi.Grant enlisted in the Army last February "because of all the people that were killed on 9/11," his father, John Grant, said yesterday."He wanted to go do the right thing," said John Grant, 70, an Army veteran who served 24 years in the FDNY before retiring in 1982. "He was very patriotic."Brian Grant's family was stunned when he suddenly enlisted, but understood his decision.One of his brothers is a city firefighter, another is an NYPD officer and a third is in the Army Reserves. Brian Grant's father said his fourth son "wanted to serve one way or another.""He did it to make it a better place here for us," said his older sister, Maureen Grant. "He did it for everybody back here."Brian Grant was born and reared on Staten Island and moved to Dallas. He was working as a sales manager for Cintas commercial uniform company when he decided to enlist. He originally was deployed to South Korea but got new orders to go to Iraq in August.Always good-natured, he sent home letters from Iraq filled with upbeat messages and funny stories about pesky sand fleas. "He always kept his spirits up," his mother, Carol Grant, said."He would say, 'Don't worry about it. Don't worry about it. I'll be okay,'" his sister said.After he was felled by a sniper's bullet, two Army officers arrived at his parents' door in Florida and told them the horrible news. "As soon as I saw the uniforms, I knew," John Grant said.The family plans to hold his funeral services on Staten Island and then bury him in Arlington National Cemetery."He was only in, like, nine months," his father said.
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************

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    MembersZone Subscriber E229Lt's Avatar
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    MembersZone Subscriber sbfdco1's Avatar
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    Brothers Rest in Peace, the world needs more people like you!
    Jim
    Firefighter/EMT
    IACOJ
    ftm-ptb-rfb-egh-ktf-dtrt!

    September 11, 2001 - NEVER FORGET!

    BETTER TO DIE ON YOUR FEET THAN LIVE ON YOUR KNEES!

  5. #5
    Forum Member RspctFrmCalgary's Avatar
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    Those are both very moving stories.

    My thoughts are with the Swift family and Dan's brothers at Ladder Company 43. Hopefully Dan will make a full recovery.

    My condolences to the Grant famly, FDNY and NYPD. Even though Private Grant wasn't a firefighter, with his father and a brother being part of the FDNY family, and another brother serving in the NYPD, his loss must still be like losing one of your own. Sleep with angels, Brian.

    Never Forget
    September 11th - Never Forget

    I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

    Sheri
    IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
    Honorary Flatlander

    RAY WAS HERE FIRST

  6. #6
    FIREMAN 1st GRADE E40FDNYL35's Avatar
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    Friday, December 3rd, 2004 -- LANDSTUHL, Germany - A wounded soldier, crutches under his arms, a Santa hat perched on his head, freezes in the hospital corridor at the sound of a familiar voice so far from home.
    "Pops?" East Harlem Firefighter Daniel Swift calls out as he spots his dad, retired NYPD Detective John Swift, barreling down the Army hospital hallway. "Hey, Pops!""How ya doin', Danny? You okay?" the father says, engulfing his son, crutches and all, in a loving bear hug."Doing good now, Dad," Daniel Swift answers, something he never expected to say just three days after surviving an Iraqi ambush that killed two of his friends - including fellow FDNY Firefighter Christian Engeldrum - and sent him and two other Army National Guardsmen to the hospital."Doing good now," he says.

    The News flew with Swift's father to Germany Wednesday night to be reunited with his son in the hospital.

    The medicine worked.Swift is slated to be shipped stateside as early as tomorrow so he can recuperate from the shrapnel that sprayed into his right eye and legs when a hidden bomb ripped open his Humvee.The shrapnel tore into his face so deeply that doctors decided to leave it alone rather than do more damage digging it out - a Baghdad souvenir, they called it.That doesn't matter, Swift said yesterday. All that matters is getting home fast."I have to get home in time for Chris' funeral," Swift said, referring to Engeldrum. "I have to get back in time."Engeldrum, who worked out of the Ladder 61 firehouse in the Bronx, was riding in the front seat of the Humvee when the crude 300-pound bomb exploded Monday near Baghdad.

    The New York unit was out doing what it was told to do - draw insurgents' fire away from civilians and the fledging Iraqi National Congress. The soldiers were asked to be bait.Swift, who lives in Yonkers and was a city EMT before joining the Fire Department in 2002, tried feverishly to save Engeldrum.But the 39-year-old sergeant's wounds were too massive, and all Swift had to work with were his hands. His medic kit had been blown to bits.The Humvee's driver, Wilfredo Urbina, of Baldwin, L.I. - Swift's 29-year-old roommate - also was killed in the attack."I tried so hard to prepare myself to deal with severe trauma, and it didn't count for s---," Swift said with his characteristic bluntness.Swift said he had hit up buddies in well-to-do Eastchester, N.Y., for some of the latest lifesaving equipment to add to his medic bag. He had medical tools even the Army doesn't provide, including a fiber-optic laryngoscope, a tubular instrument that can be inserted into the mouth to observe the respiratory tract.

    None of it survived the blast.
    Yesterday, Swift kept reliving the last few minutes he shared with his friends before the deadly attack.Swift said he had been stunned to find Engeldrum - known as Drum to his friends - mobilizing with the same unit. The two men met several years ago when Swift was still an EMT in the North Bronx and Engeldrum was fighting fires in same neighborhoods. In Iraq, the two firefighters became fast friends."Firemen love to bulls---, to talk shop," Swift said as he sat in one of the hospital waiting rooms with his dad. "We can make a firehouse kitchen anywhere. It could be in a Humvee. We'd bulls--- for hours."One of the soldiers Swift helped save after Monday's attack, Felix Vargas, of the Bronx, was recovering at the same hospital."We talked," Swift said. "His spirits are up."
    Vargas, a 35-year-old former Marine who reenlisted in the Army National Guard, has a broken femur, two broken ribs and a bruised lung.Yesterday morning he called his parents, who live in the Mott Haven Millbrook Houses in the South Bronx, to tell them he was feeling better."When I talked to him this morning, I was so happy," said his father, Jesus Vargas, 74. "I told him, 'Good job. We're so proud of you.'"A borough away, in Queens, the mother of the Humvee's seriously wounded gunner was praying for his recovery."This is the most horrific thing that's ever happened to me," said the 50-year-old mother, who asked that her son not be named."I'm proud of him," she said, standing in the doorway of her Roosevelt Island apartment. "I don't want my neighbors to know. I don't want anyone's pity."Swift had helped the gunner breathe again after the explosion, but shrapnel hit his brain.
    He was in the Army hospital with Swift last night, and a ventilator and tubes helped keep him alive as he floated in a medically induced coma.

    "People at home think Iraq is some kind of security detail," Swift said. "They don't realize it's urban warfare, that it is hard-core violence."

    Other soldiers recuperating at the hospital offered similar grim stories.

    Sgt. David Morton, 33, of Summit, N.J., had been shot twice, earning him two Purple Hearts, since his infantry regiment landed in Iraq in August.

    Sgt. Alan Pitts, of Rahway, N.J., who met Swift at the hospital, came away with a seriously injured back when he and a handful of soldiers were attacked by more than 100 insurgents.

    "It's a tough time," Swift said. "People are prepared to do the job. They're proud to do it.

    "But every day, it seems like one more person is hurt or killed."
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************

  7. #7
    FIREMAN 1st GRADE E40FDNYL35's Avatar
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    Default Brave shave for ailing pal

    January 4, 2005 -- Queens firefighters shaved off their locks in support of Daniel Martin, a tough 26-year-old smoke-eater who has been battling cancer instead of flames in recent months."If he has to be bald, we want to be bald with him," said Firefighter Sean Caine, 28, one of Martin's close friends at Engine 295, in Whitestone. Martin, on the job for three years, was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma about four months ago, when doctors found a fist-size cancer mass in his chest, spurring rounds of chemotherapy treatment. He shaved off his brown hair when some patches fell out.Martin said he appreciates his colleagues' support and hopes to return to work soon. "I love those guys," he said.
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************

  8. #8
    FIREMAN 1st GRADE E40FDNYL35's Avatar
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    January 6, 2005 -- Melanie Harman's heart was beating a mile a minute when she set eyes on Brooklyn Firefighter Greg Hansen yesterday for the first time - and it was beating with his blood.
    Harman, 37, of West Virginia, came to New York to thank Hansen for donating his bone marrow and giving her the priceless gift of life.
    "I feel like he's my brother. I have his blood inside of me," said Harman, who was O positive before the transplant procedure and now has Hansen's type A blood. "He's a hero already, but he's my personal hero."Hansen, 24, assigned to Ladder 153 in Sheepshead Bay, downplayed his selflessness."I'm just happy to do something," he said.
    Harman's rare meeting with her donor occurred at a reception at Fire Department headquarters in downtown Brooklyn, hosted by the New York Blood Center to increase awareness about bone marrow and blood donations.
    Hansen wasn't alone among the Bravest in his generosity.
    Firefighter Peter McMahon donated marrow that saved the life of Devendar Mata of St. Louis.
    As Mata, 32, walked slowly toward McMahon, 25, of Ladder 26 in Harlem, her eyes began to flutter with excitement.
    "I was nervous and scared," said the software designer after meeting the man who literally changed her life.
    Mata, who has been battling leukemia, had the marrow transplant operation a year ago.She gave McMahon a silver watch engraved with the words "Nothing Can Compare" to show her appreciation.
    "I'm glad to finally see her," McMahon said. "I'm glad I had the privilege to do this."Bone marrow is a soft, spongy tissue in the interior of certain bones that is the site of blood cell production.
    In one type of marrow transplant, doctors drill into the back of the donor's pelvic bone and extract the marrow. The donor receives anesthesia during procedure, and the bone marrow regenerates naturally in four to six weeks. The recipient is given the marrow intravenously.
    Fire Commissioner Nicholas Scoppetta said Hansen and McMahon demonstrate a commitment that can't be taught. "They save lives in ways they are not trained to do," Scoppetta said.
    Harman, a teacher's assistant, said Hansen's gift has allowed her to fend off two deadly cancers and has given her an opportunity to watch her three daughters grow up.
    "Here is a man who sacrificed his time and his bone marrow to give me life," said Harman, who said she felt stronger with Hansen's blood pumping in her veins. "I have that firefighter energy."
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************

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