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  1. #1
    Forum Member backsteprescue123's Avatar
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    Default Holmatro Cordless HRT

    Has anyone used the Holmatro Cordless Hydraulic Tool. I searched and couldnt find anything. It looks like it is powerd by a DEWALT 24v battery pack. Any comments??
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  2. #2
    Forum Member MetalMedic's Avatar
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    We had a discussion about this tool on this forum a while back. The tool is actually a hydraulic tool with a battery powered pump. Never used one, but I am sure they have their place in the rescue business. Hurst also makes a similar tool and I would not be surprised if other companies are offering them as well.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

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  3. #3
    FIGJAM lutan1's Avatar
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    The SES here in Victoria, Australia have just issued these out to all their rescue units. VICSES I'll throw the feelers out to mates that are members and see if I can get some feedback....
    Luke

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber NB87JW's Avatar
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    RFRDxplorer,

    I used one (the prototype of the Holmatro Self-contained rescue tool or SCRT) at an extrication competition a few years back. They run off of a 24v DeWalt Ni-Cad battery now) They also call it their BCT (Battery Combi-tool). It was kind of a novelty, I liked it for an additional adjunct but would never depend on it as a primary tool. Not having the hydraulic hoses gave more mobility and made positioning a little easier. Power was just "ok" compared to hydraulic devices , but very good for a battery operated unit. It was a tool I only used there from a vendor and did not put it through all my normal testing parameters either. Stick with the Hydraulics for your primary means no matter what brand you select.

    Be safe young brother.

    Fraternally, Jordan

    Oh yeah, here is a link to the tool site I found for ya'll
    ( http://www.holmatro-usa.com/scrt_index.htm )
    "Making Sense with Common Sense"
    Motor Vehicle Rescue Consultants
    ( MVRC@comcast.net) Jordan Sr.

  5. #5
    Forum Member backsteprescue123's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info NB87JW. The site was great also.
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  6. #6
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    Our department is preparing to purchase three rescue/pumpers and equip them with some basic extrication equipment. We operate within an automatic aid system where a truck company is dispatched for incidents requiring extrication. We are seriously considering the Holmatro SCRT for its flexibilty, provided that it won´t cost an arm and a leg.

    I am still having a difficult time finding anybody who actually uses this equipment on their apparatus. Does anybody have any input as to this equipment´s efficacy? Any input as to basic extrication equipment that would fit the bill for a first onscene engine company? Much thanks for any help!

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber BurnCMSFD's Avatar
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    Default SCRT

    We have two of them up here and the first time we tried one out it failed on us, it could have been cause it was about 35 below zero, we tried a couple of batteries and it wouldn't cut elcrapo. Apparently there was some problem with it, we used it when it warmed up around 40 degrees and it did so so. It is easy to manipulate but the power is just not there. My personal opinion is they were a waste of money, and they weren't cheap, forgot what we paid. The AC carries them in there vehicle in case of ....? I really don't know why they carry them but thats besides the point. Holmatro has excellent tools but I personally dont' think this is one of them. If I was setting up a truck get some hardline hydraulic tools, cutter, spreader, ram is nice but not used as nearly as often. Aglass, the room you have on your truck will be the deciding factor on what you are going to put on it for rescue I would believe. And im not knocking holmatro but that SCRT shouldn't be one of them. Put on some of there other tools.
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  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber npfd801's Avatar
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    Default

    To me (and I'm by no means as schooled in this stuff as most here), the battery powered tool would be a fine tool in the box to have for certain situations, but I don't think it would be my first choice as the only hydraulic extrication equipment on a rig. I think a better choice if cost is an issue would be a small pump and combi-tool and a cip saw, which would get a whole lot of work done before the heavy stuff could get there (if it was even needed).

    A neighboring department runs three stations, with an SOG that a mini-pumper is first out on a wreck. One heavy rescue is centrally located in district, and I'd bet 90% of the time the combi-tool on the mini pumper gets the job done before the squad is on scene. We're lucky enough to have every station equipped with cutters, spreaders, air tools and cip saws, though most of the time its overkill. A squad is equipped with airbags and rams, along with more extensive equipment, if needed. I'm not complaining however, and as few extrications that we actually have, we're very fortunate to possess the equipment that we do have.

    Boy that was long-winded. I'm still fighting pretty stiff resistance to get some cordless recip saws on our rigs, asking for something like this would probably get me committed.

  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber NB87JW's Avatar
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    aglass,

    Stop considering the SCRT/BCT as a "first line" tool. BurnCMSFD experiences (although in extreme conditions) alone should be a sign not to use it as a primary tool.

    If you can afford to buy a powered hydraulic cutter and spreader, do that first. Having the ability to run two tools in an evolution is paramount and can save time, and saving time may mean everything to the victim.

    Get a pump that can run both lines simultaneously. Plus, you may want add 5-10 more feet of hose than you think you need. (Better to have it and not need it, than need it and not have it).

    BUT, if you cannot afford two tools then a combi tool may be the first choice for you due to its multi-task capabilities but with a little bit less spread width.

    Be Safe.

    Fraternally , Jordan
    "Making Sense with Common Sense"
    Motor Vehicle Rescue Consultants
    ( MVRC@comcast.net) Jordan Sr.

  10. #10
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    To all,

    Thanks so much for your input. I have passed your comments on to our apparatus committee. So far my fears have been confirmed:

    a neat idea but no reliability or power

    We operate in extemely hot temperatures here in Arizona. I have been worried about battery reliability in these conditions. Thanks again for all of your input.

  11. #11
    Forum Member Fire304's Avatar
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    We have tossed the idea around of getting something simular for the RIT here, no hoses means you could take it deep into a scene to extricate a trapped FF. Other option is to bring a gas powered simo with the combi, but that assumes you have an athmosphere that will allow a gas engine to run.


    NB87JW, we got the Amkus Ultimate system and (in our configuration) we can run 3 tools (each on a 100' preconnect) at the same time. Extrication time is measured in seconds now. If we need to go further we carry a gas simopump but I loath having to go back to the dark ages of waiting for the tool to work or waiting for the other guy to finish his cut.
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  12. #12
    FIGJAM lutan1's Avatar
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    Default

    From a good friend of mine who's department took delivery of one of these tools recently-
    Hi everyone,

    Last night at training we took delivery of a new piece of equipment
    funded by State HQ via AAMI or CBR funding. This new tool is not in
    service yet but will be when we work out which vehicle, where, etc.
    I am hoping Glenn will finalise this issue this week for us.

    As you can see in the photos it is a battery powered rescue tool for
    use in various situations such as car crashes, USAR, industrial rescues
    etc. Being battery powered means it is very portable and compact.

    Features:
    - small, portable with no cables or hoses
    - spreader, shears and comes with a chain set also
    - approx 20 minutes of solid tool work with 1 battery
    - we have a spare battery
    - the charger properly charges the batteries and takes 60 mins
    - carry strap to hold it over your shoulders
    - weight is about 14kg

    Usage:
    1 - attach the battery pack if it is not already attached
    2 - press the ON button and green lights will turn on - READY NOW
    3 - twist the handle grip to operate the tool
    4 - use the tips and shears like our normal spreaders
    5 - when running flat, red lights will flash
    6 - battery clips out and in like a radio battery
    7 - press and hold ON/OFF button for 2 secs to turn off
    8 - carry strap clicks onto metal handle and dog clip into wire loop
    just poking out of the twist grip control section

    Issues:
    - probably will go in rescue 1 with accessories and spare battery
    Still need to work out where it can be fixed securely
    - we will need to check this tool each week and ensure we charge
    the batteries as per the instruction manuals
    - RCR operators should supervise anyone using this tool

    Advantages:
    - excellent for opening bonnets and boots very quickly
    - excellent for breaking open doors in houses if required
    - can be used along side our other tools, more work being done
    - good for tight spots inside cabin and steering wheel etc.
    - can be used whilst other tools are being setup (no delay)
    - can be carried over shoulder down cliffs or onto structures
    - will be great under trains or other difficult access spots
    See attached photos. Note that lack of PPE as no actual metal movement was being performed at any stage...
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Luke

  13. #13
    FIGJAM lutan1's Avatar
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    Photo #2
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    Luke

  14. #14
    FIGJAM lutan1's Avatar
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    Photo #3
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    Luke

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