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    Question Smooth bore vs Fog

    Just curious as to what the rest of yall use along the lines of truck washing soap, wax, tire cleaner, and so on. I have used many brands from Turtle wax, Nu Finish, Eagle One, and Mothers (with mothers being my favorite). I use Black magic tire cleaner, and “Awesome” cleaner as wheel cleaner. Also what do yall use to polish your diamond decking? By now I know you are probably wandering what “smooth bore vs Fog has to do with this topic, but it fits in... Which do you wash your trucks with? A Smooth bore garden hose nozzle or a variable fog nozzle? I like to do the pre-rinse with the “high-pressure” smooth bore solid stream, and then from there on use the fog pattern.(I also knew that the title of the thread would get some attention) Main thing I’d like to know is what soaps and waxes yall have had experience with and what seems to protect and shine the longest.

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    Default Re: Smooth bore vs Fog

    Originally posted by HFRH28
    Just curious as to what the rest of yall use along the lines of truck washing soap, wax, tire cleaner, and so on. I have used many brands from Turtle wax, Nu Finish, Eagle One, and Mothers (with mothers being my favorite). I use Black magic tire cleaner, and “Awesome” cleaner as wheel cleaner. Also what do yall use to polish your diamond decking? By now I know you are probably wandering what “smooth bore vs Fog has to do with this topic, but it fits in... Which do you wash your trucks with? A Smooth bore garden hose nozzle or a variable fog nozzle? I like to do the pre-rinse with the “high-pressure” smooth bore solid stream, and then from there on use the fog pattern.(I also knew that the title of the thread would get some attention) Main thing I’d like to know is what soaps and waxes yall have had experience with and what seems to protect and shine the longest.
    Since I am a huge car buff, I will try to chime in alittle here:

    Our Tanker has won every tanker category it has participated in when I was in charge of detailing her. Here are a few of the cleaning supplies I use:

    Mothers aluminum polish, hard work, great stuff
    Microfiber towels, no lint, very soft
    Mothers polish and caranuba wax

    I NEVER was the exterior with a solid stream high pressure nozzle. I always "mist" the paint, and let the brushes and soap get the grime off. The underbody and such are a different story, and the steam pressure washer gets a good work out

    Hope this helps.

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    I have an automotive detailing venture on the side... and along with it comes an arsenal of waxes, polishes, compounds, paint cleaning clay, automotive cleaners and equipment (pressure washer, Porter cable random orbit polisher, Gem orbital polisher, Makita rotary polisher, vet/dry vac, carpet extractor)...
    unfortunatly, the City buys the cheapest stuff they can get

    The City buys Zep car wash soap in 55 gallon drums, Zep is okay. For wax, they buy Zep spray wax and Turtle wax: mad:

    I bring in the stuff I don't use anymore to the firehouse or my own stuff when we are assigned to do the quarterly wash/wax of the rigs.

    Nozzle of choice: the Ultimate hose nozzle. It looks like a combo nozzle, and goes from straight stream to a fog pattern. If you have excellent water presuure, it is the best!

    I got mine at Home Depot, $20.

    PS: If you can find the November 1992 issue of Firehouse Magazine around.. I wrote an article on apparatus detailing!
    Last edited by CaptainGonzo; 12-05-2004 at 10:54 AM.
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    One thing that I found works best on my car is on the final rinse, don't use a nozzle on the hose. The truck dries much easier........

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    Originally posted by firenresq77

    on the final rinse, don't use a nozzle on the hose.

    Now that's what you call SMOOTH BORE !


    -bob-

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    I also use the no nozzle final rinse. I had the task of washing one of our trucks for a fire prevention weekend, so i decided to give the Eagle One wax as you dry. Turns out it was more of a pain in the butt than it was worth, but it gave it an EXCELLENT shine. I even waxed two more that way, and still have two more to go, but it sure beats the grit that the paste leaves behind in all the nooks and crannies that you pick out for weeks.

    Other than waxing wheels, what have yall found that will keep brake dust from sticking? Brake dust is a HUGE pet peeve of mine.
    Last edited by HFRH28; 12-05-2004 at 08:54 PM.

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    The high temperaures generated by braking will break down any wax placed on wheels. Ypu would be better off with a synthetic wax, such as Klassse SG, Liquid Glass, Blackfire, or Meguiar's #20 polymer sealent. You will still get brake dust, bur it will be easier to remove.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
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    Gonzo, I will have to agree with the Liquid Glass. That is the best stuff I have ever used. Kinda pricey but wee worth it.

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    Originally posted by HFRH28
    I also use the no nozzle final rinse. I had the task of washing one of our trucks for a fire prevention weekend, so i decided to give the Eagle One wax as you dry. Turns out it was more of a pain in the butt than it was worth, but it gave it an EXCELLENT shine. I even waxed two more that way, and still have two more to go, but it sure beats the grit that the paste leaves behind in all the nooks and crannies that you pick out for weeks.

    How are you applying the wax?

    It is much better to apply a thin coating of wax. A thick coating is a waste of product and a bitch to remove.

    As far as trim, "nooks and crannies" (is it a fire truck or a Thomas' english muffin? LOL ). use 3M painters masking tape (the blue stuff) or 3M auto painters tape (the green stuff) to mask off the area. A few minutes spent taping saves hours of aggravation. To remove the wax from the "nooks and crannies" use a soft natural bristle brush, trim the length of the bristles to a quarter of an inch (a papercutter is ideal for this) The length gives the bristles enough stiffness to get the imbedded wax out of the nooks and crannies., and being natural, the bristles will not mar the paint as your remove the wax.

    posted by SSHANK42
    Gonzo, I will have to agree with the Liquid Glass. That is the best stuff I have ever used. Kinda pricey but wee worth it.
    "the bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price!"

    As we speak, there are $77K worth of vehicles in my driveway and garage. (a 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo, my son's 2001 Mustang and my 1997 F-150 Supercab 4x4). They get protected with quality automotive cleaners, polishes and waxes. My F-150 still looks new.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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    The "grit" i was referring to is the dust from when you kock off the dried wax. I have never thought about using painters tape, but i'll see if i can get the asst. chief to swing a few extra bucks for some tape. Another cleaner i forgot to mention for light bars is the Mcguires plastic cleaner and polish. I used my 18V drill on low range (300 RPM max) with a cheap buffer that will chuck up into a drill from wal-mart (Wally world for those of you who are still hooked on the theme park). Buff the cleaner in, wipe it off... buff the polish in, wipe it off, and then buff the lense with a clean, dry buffing wheel. Gives it a GREAT shine and looks almost new!

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    Try S-100 or P21S wax. They are "easy on-easy off" and leave no white residue behind.

    S100 is available at Hareey Davidson dealers. They also have S100 Shine Enhancing Paint Cleaner aka S100 SEPC.

    P21S is the same except for price. The S100 is about $16 for an 8 ounce jar, the P21S is about $21. Both are made by the same manufacturer.. go figure!
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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