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  1. #1
    Forum Member Fire40man's Avatar
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    Default Fire hose arrows?

    Looking for companies that make arrows to apply to fire hose to show the way out. Would like to compare products if ohter company makes them. Found the one from benardeasyexit, are there any more?


  2. #2
    Member N8sfd333's Avatar
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    Default

    just make sure you dont do a reverse lay with that line.

    hehe
    FTM-PTB/Leather Forever

  3. #3
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Default Umm...

    I am not trying to be a smart *** here, but couldnt you
    spray paint them on? Make a template and buy some hi
    temp. paint?

  4. #4
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    Wink not trying to be a smartass either...BUT..

    ...you can't feel a spray painted arrow in zero visibility. The BEES has raised arrows to guide you out. My Dept uses them and I think they are a great tool to have.

  5. #5
    Forum Member stm4710's Avatar
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    Default

    What happend to just feeling the lugs out?

    JW
    I dont suffer from insanity, I enjoy every minute of it.

  6. #6
    Member N8sfd333's Avatar
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    Default

    im with that, feel the lugs if you dont know how to follow a hose out by feeling the links, what are you doing in the building?
    FTM-PTB/Leather Forever

  7. #7
    former FH.com member
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    Lightbulb

    It's just another "tool in the toolbox", that's all.

  8. #8
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Default Re: not trying to be a smartass either...BUT..

    Originally posted by SAFD46Truck
    ...you can't feel a spray painted arrow in zero visibility. The BEES has raised arrows to guide you out. My Dept uses them and I think they are a great tool to have.
    Great point, thanks.

  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber mglax13's Avatar
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    MFD Truck 2
    The Workhorse Company

  10. #10
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    Default

    I'm with saving the money and teaching the guys to feel the lugs, Their has to be something that you can spend the money on.
    I've noticed more and more that firefighters are using more and more toys to get by and they are forgetting, (or never learned) the basics.
    If you have the money go for it, I think it is a waste, but also teach the basics.

  11. #11
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    Default

    Another fine example of someone asking a simple straight forward question, and getting a bunch of unwanted suggestions from people who feel they need to tell everyone how they do things and why they shouldn't be doing things their own way.

    Jesus man either answer the guys question or don't click the damn reply button.

    Rigin

  12. #12
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
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    Default

    Seems as if the question did get answered in a round about way and raised another equally interesting question;WHAT ABOUT THE BASICS? We seem to forget that equally important to teaching a FF to FIGHT fire is to teach them Fireground Safety and Survival or how to GET OUT of a fire.Trinkets are neat,but not every community has them.We do extensive MA to quite a few towns,I want my personnel to know which way is out by the tool they went in with,namely the line.Some may come on in a manner less subtle than mine(brick)but they raise valid points.Are YOU properly prepared to do your job?If not;why not? T.C.

  13. #13
    Forum Member Weruj1's Avatar
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    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
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    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

  14. #14
    MembersZone Subscriber Plugmedic's Avatar
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    Default

    There are several companies that now have reflective arrows as part of the hoses outter jacket. If that fails, you always have the couplings. Practices feeling them with gloves on to figure out the way out. It is a really simple and good drill to perform.
    Jason S. - SFFD
    Local 798

  15. #15
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    Default

    Over here in Great britain we use guidelines in real snotty large jobs where there is a danger of getting lost. this is a small line in a bag with tabs every few meters they are arranged in pairs with a knotted tab and a hanging tab, the knotted always shows the way out.

    they have been used very successfully many times including down london's labryth Tube tunnels (underground/subway train) and also on board ships, and in large old warehouse buildings.

    There was a fire in london in 1992 where 2 firemen got killed on one of these lines but that is because someone laid a line right next to their one from another entry point, they followed it 'out' but it led them further in as it doubled up one side and down another, they ran out of air before they got out.

    I can see the idea behind the hose as we can feel by the couplings on our hose but it isn't easy. This is a good idea for firefighting as our guidlines are used mainly for searching in deep smoke and not so much for Firefighting.

  16. #16
    Permanently Removed CALFFBOU's Avatar
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    Default Easy...

    Like I said- "Follow your female out."

    Clear, simple, direct to the point. Done.
    Last edited by CALFFBOU; 12-13-2004 at 12:44 AM.

  17. #17
    55 Years & Still Rolling hwoods's Avatar
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    Talking Re: Easy...

    Originally posted by CALFFBOU
    Like I said- "Follow your female out."
    YEAH! What he said!..........
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
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  18. #18
    Forum Member fftrainer's Avatar
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    Default

    Trinkets are neat,but not every community has them.We do extensive MA to quite a few towns,I want my personnel to know which way is out by the tool they went in with,namely the line.
    Even though he somehow escaped from the U of E forum, I will have to agree with Rescue101

    Personally we don't use these things, money is better spent somewhere else. Like 101 said, we are frequently out on mutual aid jobs and you can't guarantee that everyone has all the same things as you. Not even a week ago my crew and I were on an interior hose line that came off of a mutual aid engine. Conditions were bad and there was an evac of the building due to eminent collapse of a section of roof. We new our way out and didn't have to follow the hose, but you get the picture of the potential.

    Now suppose, just suppose you have trained your guys so well on these snazzy new arrows and they can find their way out of anything. Put them in my situation a week ago. Hose line off a mutual aid rig, no arrows, I am disoriented and need to tuck my tail and go. Can they still do it? I hope so!

    I realize it sounds that way, but I am not trying to rip your idea. I just want to call your attention to a potential pitfall with your plan. While I agree that many tools and inventions have been great additions to the fire service, they are just that additions. The basics never get replaced. i.e Just because you have a rabbit tool, it doesn't mean you forget how to open a door with the irons.
    You have to train on multiple ways of doing things. In your case you still have to teach following the lugs, etc.

  19. #19
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    Default arrows...

    We use the Bernard Easy Exit system here in Lewisville, TX. I like the extra added bonus of what might be a quicker way of identifying the way out. We still train and know the basics of finding the large lugs on the female coupling and going in that direction however the arrows can be a quicker way of finding the exit. I do agree that there are probably more important things to spend the money on however if you are looking to just add one more thing for the safety of your firefighters why not add something that might give an indication of the way out 25 feet before you get to a coupling. I think anything that can improve our safety is a good thing...however not everyone is going to be able to throw money at it because yes there are more important things. I would like to have these arrows on our hose in my volunteer department but we're also in the process of upgrading our SCBA's and hose arrows would be one of the last things on our list.

    Brandon Thetford
    Firefighter/Paramedic - Lewisville, TX
    Captain/Training Officer - Double Oak VFD, TX

  20. #20
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    Default

    finding the large lugs on the female coupling
    Not to be rude, but aren't the larger lugs on the male side?
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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