1. #1
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    Default Can anyone change their body type?

    Trying to find a true answer. All my life I have ben a big guy. All ways had a problem with my weight. My mother, for the sake of being kind, always told me that to some degree I would always have this type of body, so dont worry so much about what you look like. I'am now older and know that it is so much more thatn what you look like. It is your length and quality of life that is at stake. I know I need to get in gear more than ever, being that Im going to be testing with departments in my area starting january, with my first cpat to be around the end of march. I have already dropped close to 30lbs but that was not really from working out. Back to my main question, I dont want to be some supper body builder, I just want to feel good about my self and get in shape to do that job that i dream about. Can I change my body, or do you get what you get.

  2. #2
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    You have two different questions here. First "can you change your body type"? Sorry to say, no you cannot change your body type. You were born with it and it is coded in your DNA.

    Second, "can you change your body"? Happy to say, yes you can and you have. You stated you lost 30 lbs, but it was not from working out. You have discovered the most important (and hardest) part about changing your body...nutrition. 80% of losing weight is from eating right. Not just the right food, but how much of the right food. My guess is that you cut out a lot of fat, stopped eating fast food and started eating more fruits and veggies. Probably increased protein (meat or soy). Keep this up, but make sure you don't over do it. Even eating the right food can make you gain weight if you eat too much.

    Remember this simple formula: Calories taken in - Calories spent. If this is a negative number, you will loose weight. If it is positive, you will gain weight.

    Now, to help you change your body more, you need to start an exercise program. I prefer to work out in a gym, but some people prefer getting the stuff at home. Either can be expensive or cheap depending on how you do it.

    If you do not know a lot about working out, I would suggest finding a local gym and talk with a trainer. Tell them what your goals are and they can help you with the basics. Working out at a gym has the advantage of diversity in equipment, the downside is that it can be costly and more people are there to do the same thing you are.

    If you cannot do this (talking to a trainter), buy some books on exercise or subscribe to some magazines (I prefer Men's Health). However avoid the "Muscle Magazines", the moves are usually advanced and not intended for people just wanting to get in better shape. Another resource is the "Firefighters Workout" bootk (check the Health and Fitness section for information).

    Both of these will help you avoid getting hurt while lifting weights. Remember to take it easy in the beginning and build up. You will not be able to bench press 300# the first day. In this regard a trainer is the best. They will build a program for your needs and teach you proper lifting techniques.

    If you do know how to work out, start lifting (easy at first), and have fun. Make three goals, the first is what you want to do by the end of the month, the second three months, the third six months. Every month re-evaluate and modify the goal for the next month (the date and goal of six months keep). After six months do it again. A training log is helpful here.

    But, by all means do not forget cardio. This is one of the best ways to burn fat...if done correctly. Search the internet for "target heart zone" and you will find what I mean.

    You say that your first CPAT is in March. My first suggestion to meet that goal is to find out what their testing criteria is, and train toward it. Increase weights and cardio as needed. But don't forget to rest. Your body needs time to recover.

    One final note, when you start to lift weights, you will feel real sore for the first week or two. Just keep lifting, it will go away.

    Good luck, if you have further questions, keep asking.

    Keep us posted.

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    Hey Vollie, I have worked out and lifted weights in the past, but things count more than ever now. I just want to make sure I do things the right way as well as being safe. I have talked to local FF about the CPAT that is given in my area. They have told me its all aout the cardio and leg strength. They have told me you need the legs underneath you to carry you on after turning to mush after the stair machine. I joined a gym the other day and I'am planning on calling tomorow to set up a session with one of the trainers. I'm hoping if I tell him what my objectives are,( the CPAT being the biggest), that he/she can help me come up with a tailored program.
    Diet is the part I struggle with the most( like many). I work anywere from 3-5 12 hr night shifts in an ER. Trying to eat at normal times and and the right foods is a challenge. Any help or ideas where I can look for help in the department would be great.
    Last edited by zcam630; 12-17-2004 at 01:59 AM.

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    First, be sure to get a list of the tasks for the CPAT to the trainer you meet with. It will help develop a program for you. They are right about the legs. I have not done a CPAT, but I have run the combat challenge, and my legs (not to mention shoulders, arms and back) were pretty much like mush at the end. But crossing that finish line is a rush. Cardio is the big thing. You will probably be working with weights 2-3 times per week, on the off days, do cardio. Mix it up also, don't just focus on the stair master, but use the threadmill, elliptical (sp?), row or any other cardio they have.

    Second, eating. You want to have small meals (300-400 calories depending on your goals) 5-6 times a day. In other words eating about every 3 to 3.5 hours. It is tough when you work in a place that keep you hoping (like and ER). If you can get away for about 10 minutes to eat that would be nice (but does not always happen).

    I prefer to make my own meals and put them in tupperware (or the like) and heat it up when I am ready. If you don't have that kind of time, look into the frozen meals. Lean Cuisine, Healthy Choice and others offer a good meal around 300-400 calories and is pretty well balanced. However, you have to watch the ingrediants.

    Another tip, if you add salt to your food, stop. Food contains enough sodium already that you don't need to add more. Besides, it will make your body hold onto more water.

    Which brings me to another point. Water. IMHO, you cannot get too much water. I personally drink about 250-300 oz. per day. Yes you will go to the bathroom a lot, but if you increase your protien, your kidneys will need help flushing stuff out. Water is the best for it.

    Hope these tips help. Need any more just ask.

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