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  1. #1
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    Default drywall

    read an article the other day on some web site some where with pics on the new drywall that has plexiglass on each side. The article was showing what would force or cut it. Anyone know where?


  2. #2
    Forum Member Weruj1's Avatar
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    Question hmmmmmmmmmmmm

    havent seen that ........
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    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

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    http://www.national-gypsum.com/resou...irsystems.html

    http://www.firefighterclosecalls.com/averted.shtml

    This is a portion of the FF Closecalls article.. scroll down after clicking the link above for photos and the whole story

    As shown in the table above, all of the striking tools were proven ineffective in breaching the Hi-Impact 8000 Wallboard. The cutting tools proved to be most effective, usually penetrating the Lexan in less than 10 swings. The Lexan did not break easily after being struck but it did crack enough to become pliable enough to bend while the firefighter crawled through the hole. One thing to consider while you are crawling through the wall, is the Lexan had tendency to get caught up on personal protective equipment and will possibly cut or rip the PPE with the sharp edges. Another consideration, is the amount of time it took to create a hole large enough to accommodate a firefighter’s size. If fire conditions are deteriorating, the firefighter is already at increased risk. Also, this test was performed with the Hi-Impact 8000 Wallboard on only 1 side of the stud. Chances are, if this product is encountered, it will be mounted to both sides of the studs, therefore at least doubling the amount of time and effort to breach the wall in an emergency situation.




    Conclusion:



    In conclusion, it was demonstrated that breaching the Hi-Impact 8000 Wallboard has a high resistance to impact forces brought on by striking tools. The tool of choice when this product is encountered is a cutting tool. This test further stresses the fact that departments need to get out in their response areas (even auto or mutual aid areas) and know what kind of building materials are being used
    Last edited by Halligan84; 12-15-2004 at 09:15 PM.

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    Forum Member Co11FireGal's Avatar
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    Question

    Doesn't it seem like that would be kinda hard to paint/wallpaper?? I mean, it doesn't show a picture but, paint or trying to glue something to plastic? I'm not really handy when it comes to building things, so I'm probably missing why the stuff is supposed to be good...what's the point??
    Last edited by Co11FireGal; 12-15-2004 at 09:24 PM.
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    Forum Member Weruj1's Avatar
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    Co......the Lexan is laminated between the gypsum itself.........scroll down the last link ........you will see a pic of it.......just what the fire service needs !
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
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    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

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    Forum Member stm4710's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Co11FireGal
    , so I'm probably missing why the stuff is supposed to be good...what's the point??
    Remember what I told you what we learned in fire science.......if the answer is not beer......its $$$$. These are panels are used in places where they would be subject to abuse. School halways,office hallways,halls,restuarts,hotel s, airports,medical facilitys, dance halls,fire station day rooms and other places where dry wall finishs would be subject to heavy use and abuse. The idea is if you build a stronger wall, less maitnence over time therefore less money haveing someone going around repairing holes in the wall.
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    Time for explosives!!!

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    Forum Member Weruj1's Avatar
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    anyone recall the "jet axe" ! ?
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
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    ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
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    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

  9. #9
    55 Years & Still Rolling hwoods's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Weruj1
    anyone recall the "jet axe" ! ?
    You HAD to bring that up. In my younger and, well,... younger days, we actually carried that stuff on the ladder truck. Used it a few times in training, but never needed it on a real incident. Thankfully. We did create a few Maalox moments for the Chiefs though. I was on a crew that tried using it to breach a concrete block wall. It worked. It worked so well that we were finding bits of concrete quite a bit farther than we planned. In fact, we found a piece in the windshield of a parked car. It went back to being something that we kept hidden from the rest of the world.
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    Forum Member Weruj1's Avatar
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    I saw it in a FF training video eeons ago ............they too breached an outside wall .....very effectively.
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
    Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
    ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
    RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
    LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

  11. #11
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    we are telling our age

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    09250

    HI-Impact Wallboard




    Description

    This is one tough wallboard. By combining the surface toughness of Hi-Abuse® BRAND Wallboard with the strength of Lexan®,* National Gypsum has created a wallboard that can really stand up to scrapes and hard knocks. The newly improved Hi-Impact® BRAND Fire-Shield® Type X Wallboard provides the maximum combination of abrasion resistance and impact/penetration resistance for those areas faced with exceptionally high levels of wear and tear. Here's a wallboard that can go in places you never dreamed gypsum wallboard could go before.

    Hi-Impact BRAND Wallboard

    As strong and tough as it is, Hi-Impact Wallboard is as easy to use and install as regular gypsum wallboard. Less expensive and labor intensive than concrete block and fiber-reinforced gypsum panels, the original Hi-Impact Wallboard has quickly become the preferred choice of architects and contractors. Now, that original is even better and tougher with the addition of improved surface abrasion resistance. Thus, improved Hi-Impact Fire-Shield Type X Wallboard is superbly suited for all those really tough jobs, such as schools, correctional facilities, dormitories, hospitals, mass transit facilities, public housing, common areas and retail separation walls.

    Hi-Impact Wallboard panels are backed with Lexan® substrate and are available in four increasingly higher levels of impact resistance:

    Hi-Impact® BRAND 1000 with a 0.010" Lexan® substrate
    Hi-Impact® BRAND 2000 with a 0.020" Lexan® substrate
    Hi-Impact® BRAND 3000 with a 0.030" Lexan® substrate
    Hi-Impact® BRAND 8000* with a 0.080" Lexan® substrate
    *Hi-Impact 8000 is manufactured with heavy natural-finish paper on the face side.

    And, just like regular wallboard, Hi-Impact BRAND Wallboard can be cut and installed quickly; so painting, other decoration and the installation of most metal and wood trim can begin almost immediately.

    With Hi-Impact Wallboard, now tough walls can still be good looking.

    Each 5/8" panel consists of a fire resistive type X gypsum core encased in heavy, smooth, white abrasion-resistant paper on the face side and strong liner paper on the back side. Lexan substrate is bonded to the back side of the panel to provide additional impact/penetration resistance. Long edges of the panels are tapered to allow joints to be reinforced and concealed with National Gypsum Joint Tape and Joint Treatment Compounds.

    Applications
    This unique wallboard is designed for use in wall assemblies in areas where surface durability and impact/penetration resistance are a major concern.
    Features & Benefits
    Provides greater resistance to surface abuse, indentation and impact/penetration than fiber-reinforced gypsum panels.
    Hi-Impact Wallboard's smooth white face paper is highly resistant to scuffing when sanding wallboard joints and fasteners providing a superior surface for decoration.
    Lightweight, cost-efficient material that readily accepts a wide range of decorative finishes.
    Hi-Impact Wallboard is easily cut for quick installation, permitting painting or other decoration and the installation of most metal or wood trim almost immediately.
    The gypsum core will not support combustion or transmit temperatures greatly in excess of 212°F (100°C) until completely calcined, a slow process.
    Expansion and contraction under normal atmospheric changes is negligible.

    [SIZE=3]

    Pretty interesting stuff - checking to see if it is available in Canada!

  13. #13
    Disillusioned Subscriber Steamer's Avatar
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    There was someone that posted some info on here awhile back that had done some testing with the stuff. Unfortunately, I can't recall his name to give him and his department proper credit.

    Keep in mind that this stuff may cause some things that we aren't used to seeing. With fire in the partition, the lexan will burn/melt and fall away from the drywall, leaving a small gap at the point of contact with the stud. Thia is going to permit a potential path of spread for fire between stud spaces that we wouldn't ordinarily expect to see.

    The one thing that stood out to me in his video was the purple and pink smoke that profusely poured from the test walls they built, even with a relatively small volume of fire. I'm not certain, but I think it would be safe to assume that the stuff couldn't possibly be good for you , so SCBA should be a requirement to open these spaces.

    The molten lexan may also run from under the wall leaving marks on the floor that would resemble an ignitable liquid had been poured to start a fire, especially where carpet or linoleum may be present. My point here is that we need to be really careful about reading some of these things a little more closely when doing an origin and cause investigation. I'm hoping to do some tests on this potential in the near future to see first hand what I'm really dealing with.

    from Weruj: anyone recall the "jet axe" ! ?
    Yup, remember it well. Didn't somebody out west lose a limb or two when the thing was used with the "This side out" panel placed "in"? Essentially a shape charge, the force was directed in the wrong direction. It sticks in my head that this was when they took it off the market.
    Last edited by Steamer; 12-16-2004 at 11:58 AM.
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    Forum Member CaptOldTimer's Avatar
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    Down the road about 100 miles from Harve, we had a demo on the jet axe years ago. We never bought it but it did look pretty good back then. It is kind of like the salesman trying to sell us High Expansion foam once. None of the old Dinosaurs wanted to see the demo let alone to buy the stuff.




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    Forum Member stm4710's Avatar
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    With the lexan melting, would it be possible that this stuff would just become " regular" dry wall since the lexan is no longer doing anything but flowing out?
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    Has their been a fire test with the lexan? I cant see the lexan "running out". Lexan is much like plexi - glass ecept more rigid (obviously), so areas where their is flame impingment I can see weakening, but the integrity around the weakspot would still be there?
    I assume this product would have to undergo testing for fire resistance??

  17. #17
    Disillusioned Subscriber Steamer's Avatar
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    There was a department that conducted testing, and the chief sent me a copies of their report. They set up a simulation of a partition fire with both sides of the wall made of this laminated gypsum board. From the report:
    Packing paper was ignited inside the wall issuing a light white smoke condition. After approximately 2 minutes, the smoke color changed to black. 4 minutes after ignition of the paper, the Lexan backing of the wallboard was burning, issuing a heavier black/gray smoke. The smoke color and condition changed again to a heavy purple/gray color 1 minute later. After approximately 6 minutes from the point of ignition, heavy fire and smoke were issuing out of the end stud that the fire was started. Also, heavy smoke was pushing from every opening of the test wall. After approximately 1 minute of heavy fire and smoke, the conditions changed to a very heavy push of pink/gray smoke with no fire. The smoke was coming out of the vent holes a dark gray color and as it hit the outside air, it would change to a bright pink. After a few more minutes, a white colored smoke began issuing along with the gray and pink. During this time frame, the conditions would alternate from heavy fire issuing from the end stud, to very heavy pink/gray smoke issuing from the same area. Melted Lexan was noted coming from the bottom of the test wall. Upon completion of the burn time, the fire was extinguished using water from a 5-gallon pump can. The water extinguished the fire with no problems.
    This is a photo of the interior panel:
    Attached Images Attached Images  
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    Disillusioned Subscriber Steamer's Avatar
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    from stm4710: With the lexan melting, would it be possible that this stuff would just become " regular" dry wall since the lexan is no longer doing anything but flowing out?
    From everything I've seen or read about this stuff, that would be a reasonable assumption. There doesn't appear to be any difference in any way that really matters to us. The biggest problem comes from he strength provided by the lexan, and it's stronger than hell. It's damn near impossible to breach a hole big enough to get through the stuff in any reasonable amount of time.

    I would think that although, as mentioned earlier, that it would most likely be on both sides of a wall, I don't think you would have a problem breaching through the back side of the wall. The reinforcement of the lexan by the wall studs is what presents the greatest resistance to breaching. The back side of the wall would most likely just kick away from the wall when the connection point at the drywall screws failed.

    I'm hoping to do some tests with the Ohio Fire Marshal's Office on this stuff if I can sweet talk the lab gurus into it sometime early next year. That'll give some scientific validity to the test, and not just be some old worn out truck guy tearing **** up again. If it happens, I'm sure it'll be well photographed, and something written about it as well.
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    Forum Member firenresq77's Avatar
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    I read the story on FF close calls not long after it was first posted..... Hopefully we won't see a whole lot of it in this area....

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    There is an article in the latest Fire Engineering Magazine regarding the High Impact Gypsum board. It shows the test that was talked about in this thread.

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