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  1. #1
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    Question How much cribbing is enough?

    How much cribbing do you feel is enough to carry on the first arriving rig?

    What is the cribbing inventory of your first due rig?
    Developer and Sr. Presenter, Team Xtreme
    BIG RIG RESCUE


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber BurnCMSFD's Avatar
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    Default Crib

    Our two rescue trucks carry:
    What I think is needed is pretty much what is listed below and the things that are missing, but there are many other things that can be used for cribbing like airbags, spreader, porta power, winch, come along.. Cribbing is stabilization, not necessary wood under the frame in my opinion. And this is if you have a big enough truck to carry it, you could cut this in half and still have sufficient amount to do most jobs, adapt overcome improvise.
    4 Portable boxes and in each one:
    8 4x4
    10 2x4
    4 wedges

    4 4x4x4
    4 4x4x6
    4 8x8x3

    4 Stepchocks

    2 Sets of Wheel Chocks

    Rescue 42 Rescue Kit

    What we are missing
    Bumper Jack
    Sliding car jack

    burn
    Burn<br />LT/EMT/Inst />Central Mat-Su FD<br />Wasilla Alaska

  3. #3
    Forum Member spearsm's Avatar
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    Cribbing: You know, Everyone, including myself, says work with what works for you. With that being said again for clarification, I would never allow anyone to use a bag, jaws, etc for cribbing. those are the lifting devices, not the cribbing. I full believe in lift 1"/crib 1".
    And that is just my opinion.
    As far as how much? We have enough to build a campfire for the night if need be.
    YGBSM!
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.

    If all you have is a hammer, then your problems start to look like nails.
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  4. #4
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    Default Length is important

    What length is your cribbing?

    Do you carry any longer lengths, such as 6 or 8'?
    Developer and Sr. Presenter, Team Xtreme
    BIG RIG RESCUE

  5. #5
    Forum Member spearsm's Avatar
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    Default

    Typically, 18" give or take. Longer cribbing is for the stabilization tools, but yes we have 4'-5' pieces that we can use for cribbing. We carry 2x4, 4x4, wedges. stepchocks, and other pieces all with rope grabs to keep fingers out of bad situations.
    YGBSM!
    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.

    If all you have is a hammer, then your problems start to look like nails.
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  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber AC1503's Avatar
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    Default

    40 pc 4x4, 24 pc 2x4, 8 pc 4x4 wedge, all 18" long & made from Sugar Maple & Oak.
    4 step chocks made from 2x6 Spruce
    1 set Res-Q-Jacks (2 Jacks & 2 Struts)

    We carry 4 pc of 4x4 or 8 pc of 2x4 on 1/2" steel rods that are bent into a J shape to provide a carrying handle. A small bungee type strap is used to keep the the cribbing from sliding off of the carrier. They cost us about $3.00 each to make. That includes the steel, bending and drilling, paint, and straps. That's about 1/10 of what commerically made ones cost.
    Last edited by AC1503; 01-06-2005 at 01:44 AM.

  7. #7
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    Default

    24 4x4's 20 in. long
    8 6x6's 20 in. long
    8 4x4 8 ft. long can be used long or cut to length
    4 step chocks
    8 wedges
    4 20 in. x 20 in. 3/4 in. plywood
    2 long Rescue 42 struts
    2 short Rescue 42 struts
    various chains, straps, shackles, and pins for struts

    All of the cribbing is wood from hardware store. Easy to get and cheap (free).

  8. #8
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
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    4 6' 4x4 a myriad of 2' 4x4 2x6 2x4 1x4, stepchocks,and anything else we can fit in the compartment.Enough? Not hardly,a twin axle trailer full isn't enough if you have a multi vehicle accident.Make up some crib packs and keep them at the station,if you get to a incident and need increased levels of cribbing it doesn't take long to load the packs and get them there. T.C.

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    Default

    How many folks actually store cribbing pieces in plastic crates, ready to load onto a rig if more is needed at the scene?
    Developer and Sr. Presenter, Team Xtreme
    BIG RIG RESCUE

  10. #10
    FIGJAM lutan1's Avatar
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    Default

    How much cribbing do you feel is enough to carry on the first arriving rig?
    How long is a piece of rope? I don't think there is a right answer here. Perhaps food for thought, look at the type of vehicles being driven by the public in your response area. If they're big 4x4's, then look at enough to crib one of these. If they're a majority of sports cars or standard sedans, then get enough to crib one of them.

    How many folks actually store cribbing pieces in plastic crates, ready to load onto a rig if more is needed at the scene?
    The service I used to belong to did that as well as put 25mm webbing attached to one end of the crib lengths so as they could easily be carried.... (Some services would actually use different coloured webbing to also signify what length the crib is )
    Luke

  11. #11
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
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    Suffice it to say you probably don't have enough on the AVERAGE rig to deal with a problem bigger than a 3/4 ton 4x4.You can argue with me all day long that you do,but consider this:Your vehicle is upside down wedged under a loaded 53' dry box with a compromised rear suspension.Still think you carry enough?Yes,your struts(assuming you have them)will help support the p/u,but the rig? "We don't have those kind of incidents".Well either your naive,extraordinarily lucky,or it isn't your time yet. The level of vehicles on the nations highways isn't going down;and the intelligence level isn't going UP.So the question isn't whether you will need this resource but more of WHEN will you need it.Either way,I think I'd be "squirreling"some stock(cribbing)away for the occasion when it arises.Now I know you can stack 'roos down under but how many does it take to support a vehicle? Lessee flak jacket on,helmet fastened,kevlar chaps;Hehe I'm ready Luke. T.C.

  12. #12
    Forum Member SpartanGuy's Avatar
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    Default

    Rescue 1 carries:
    60 4x4
    30 2x4
    8 Stepchalks
    Four milk crates full of wedges(varying sizes)
    There are a couple more of weird size that are used for some of the more ackward situations
    4 8' 6x6(not used much any more due to the struts and airshores)
    1 set of Junk Yard Dogs(2 tall and 2 short struts)
    1 set of air shores(4 total)
    We also have assorted chains, ratchet straps, a winch, wheel chocks, etc.


    Rescue 2:
    20 4x4
    20 2x4
    4 Stepchalks
    1 Milkcrate full of wedges
    2 Air shores
    It has some chains, chocks, and a winch, but not as much as Rescue 1(Due to the fact that it is significantly smaller than rescue 1)

    We have a Hurst tool on each truck, each set with spreaders, cutters, and a set of rams(large & small) plus the necessary L-brackets to brace the rams on the post.

    We carry so much due to the fact that of the 8 townships that border ours, six don't have hurst tools. And the two that do are on the opposite sides from the six that don't, so we catch most of their entrapment calls.

    I think it's unexcusable for a fire department to not have a Hurst tool or a thermal imager(to name a few). There are some things that a fire department just NEEDS to have.
    "Captain 1 to control, retone this as a structure and notify the fire chief...."

    Safety is no accident.

  13. #13
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    Default

    but there are many other things that can be used for cribbing like airbags, spreader, porta power...
    Cribbing is stabilization...
    If Cribbing is STABILIZATION, why would you use a piece of equipment that when used creates a DYNAMIC load?

    I say, use VERTICAL and HORIZONTAL stabilization with wood, plastic and/or struts/jacks. Or even rocks, concrete or a wrecker.( that last one was for you T.C. and Big Rig) Use whats available, think outside the box.

  14. #14
    FIGJAM lutan1's Avatar
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    Now I know you can stack 'roos down under but how many does it take to support a vehicle? Lessee flak jacket on,helmet fastened,kevlar chaps;Hehe I'm ready Luke. T.C.
    Ahh Grandmaster101, how are you?

    My reply was to the original question- the first arriving rig. (In our situation, you were guaranteed (Except for an act of God!) to get at least one other rescue rig on scene. I have no issue with what you're saying though. I was in a constant battle to get more ON our rig when the boffins kept trying to take it OFF. (Maybe that's one of the many reasons why they're glad I've left 'em?! )
    Luke

  15. #15
    MembersZone Subscriber EEResQ's Avatar
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    Post Re: How much cribbing is enough?

    Originally posted by BigRig
    Q-#1
    How much cribbing do you feel is enough to carry on the first arriving rig?

    Q-#2
    What is the cribbing inventory of your first due rig?

    The answer to Q-#1 is really quite simple.

    A. Pull your MVA run reports from the last 3 years. Determine the correct type, number and dimensions of cribbing that "should have been used" (not what was actually used) at each MVA scene that did not require additional units to be dispatched for stabilization purposes only.

    (HINT: This makes a GREAT table-top training exercise for young rescue officers in the winter months.)

    B. Throw out all of the 0's and the 1 "big one" that occurred during the sampling period. Then, plan on loading your rig with what you needed to safely stabilize the remainder of your MVA's that "did not require additional units" over that period.

    C. Repeat this process each winter and adjust stabilization equipment load levels accordingly.


    The answer to Q-#2 should be based on A. B. and C. above.

    Please be safe!

    EEResQ
    KY
    Last edited by EEResQ; 01-09-2005 at 12:15 AM.

  16. #16
    MembersZone Subscriber dmleblanc's Avatar
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    How much cribbing do you feel is enough to carry on the first arriving rig?
    There is a simple 3-step process for determining how much cribbing you should carry....

    1) How much cribbing do you have now?

    2) Add some more

    3) Return to step 1, repeat.....
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream — and I hope you don't find this too crazy — is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    — C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

  17. #17
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
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    Lutan,I'm fine though a bit tired.It's been an insane asylum around here with all the 1-3" snowstorms we've been having. I'm in the process of putting together another "care"package for you,you must be getting a bit threadbare by now.Also a bit of light reading for your entertainment. I know where you're coming from on lightening the load,I had to issue a "spanking"to one of my officers the other day on the same issue.Nice to see you back on the boards again,it isn't the same when you're not here.Now I've got to go see where else I can stir up some hate and discontent,Hehe T.C.

  18. #18
    Forum Member RLFD14's Avatar
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  19. #19
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
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    Not enough! Hehe T.C.

  20. #20
    FIGJAM lutan1's Avatar
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    RLFD14- I love it!


    Is that first responding vehicle with back up coming?
    Luke

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