1. #1
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    Default Mask Donning in-truck?

    Had a recent discussion between truck company personnel over "donning SCBA mask in the cab" prior to getting out of truck. Currently our dept has no policy regarding "masking-up" in the truck. Some of our guys do and some wait to put on masks just prior to making entry, we have noticed that if guys do "mask-up" in the truck they sometimes miss last minute updates, or can't hear due to taking headsets off. We have also noticed that "masking-up" in the truck gives you an advantage at "first water". What are your opinions and or suggestions. Does your dept have policy/sog's that state when FF's should don SCBA mask?

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    Put the mask on in the truck, adjust for fit, then take it back off. Get off the truck, do some sizeup, grab what you need, just before you enter the atmosphere that requires the mask, put it back on - straps are already adjusted. I bet it's a bitch walking up 10 floors with a mask that has been on since you were on the truck. Use it when you need it.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Masking up in the truck makes you at a greater risk at falling out of the truck because your vision isnt all the best.
    Ryan

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    Can't do a proper size-up looking through condensation, I suspect.
    "I am permaprobie, and I approve this message."

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    The only time I would mask up in the engine is for a vehicle fire. And a confirmed vehicle fire only. That way, I could flake out the line and go on air right away. Otherwise, the mask gets too fogged up to be able to function on the fireground prior to entering an IDLH atmosphere that requires the SCBA.

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    The members of our department tend to put on their masks enroute and I hate it immensely! As mentioned, more times than not you will have condensation to the point that you cannot see anything when you get out of the truck. However, if you don't have your mask on when you bail out at the scene... you will miss the first line and will likely take grief from everyone for being slow. My department prides itself on our willingness to do aggressive interior attacks, so I don't fault anyone for wanting to be inside fast upon arrival. I am at the point now that I seldom can make the first truck out, so it is not as much of an issue.

    To answer your question, I will have to re-read the policy manual to be sure, but I don't think it specifically requires the face mask to be on. My personal opinion is that I would prefer to take the extra time to put it on after I dismount the rig and get the line(s) deployed if I can. This give you an extra moment to collect your thoughts and plan how you will perform your task.
    Richard Nester
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    Arrow Masking up enroute? Bad idea.

    Will someone please give me one good reason to mask up while enroute?

    Even some of our runs that appear to be confirmed fires are either extinguished upon our arrival (we should have better volunteer firefighters with the way our citizens extinguish their own fires) or turn out to be bogus.

    If you put your mask on while enroute, you limit your vision. You limit your ability to communicate. With some models, you limit your air flow.

    Stepping off with the mask already on makes everything you do when you first arrive on scene more difficult. You can't see to step out of the apparatus. You can't make as good of a size-up because you're fogged over. You can't talk with your company mates or citizens because they can't understand you. I don't understand why anyone would do it.

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    Default Nope

    I would never advocate or train anyone to mask up enroute for anything I don't care if you have reports of people trapped inside. You will do them, your fellow crew members or anyone else any good if you fall on your face because you can't see where you are walking.

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    I haven't had a problem with not being heard with my mask on and not being on air. And my visibility hasn't been greatly limited, either. We are yet to have anyone fall outta the truck after masking up while en route.
    -Bozz

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    Arrow

    Never heard of something like that.

    How do you look at the building? What if you have to force the door? How much air will you waste? How do you see what you are doing or where you are going? Do your size up.

    You are going to use air that quite possibly save your life in the fire. I would hate to run out of air while trapped or lost because I wasted breaths on the rig or standing in the street!

    Take your time, look at the building.

    No need to rush things.

    FTM-PTB

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    I find your replies to this thread interesting. I don't know much about your SCBA's, but I have a couple of questions- Do they only fog up if you're not breathing air from the tank, or can they fog up while you're in a fire and using your air? Also, do your exhaled breaths go out the same hose as the incoming air? Thanks for any info. I find everything about firefighting so fascinating.

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    What isn't understood? You put the mask on while in the truck, but you don't go on air until you are going in. This way, you don't take a breath of air until you are right at the door of the building, or approaching the fire if outside.
    -Bozz

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    We have no set policy.........some people have it on when they arrive and some wait til they are at the door......
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    I am a firm believer that all firefighters should wait until after they have been able to perform a complete size up of ANY incident before masking up (that included hazmat and/or CO). Any type of fire that you are going to respond to requires a size up. Vehicle fires have many hazards that if a proper size up is not conducted, can be as dangerous, if not more, than a structural fire.

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    I'm not sure how being masked up limits you ability to do a size up. Can't your necks turn?? I've never had my mask fog up that much when I'm riding in the apparatus. Masking up when you get to front door is fine but there are advantages to puting you mask on enrout. First of all don't go on air until you need it, duh. Just let your regulator hang. But having your mask on saves time, no need to put on mask, adjust it, pull over hood, strap on helmet, or put on gloves... already done. Next for engine guys no need to set down the hose, just reach down and put regulator on. Trucker don't have to trip over mask or again waste time putting on your mask either on the ladder of on the roof.

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    Thank you, ruffneck. I was just about to reply with the exact same thing.
    -Bozz

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    Originally posted by ruffneck104
    I'm not sure how being masked up limits you ability to do a size up. Can't your necks turn?? I've never had my mask fog up that much when I'm riding in the apparatus. Masking up when you get to front door is fine but there are advantages to puting you mask on enrout. First of all don't go on air until you need it, duh. Just let your regulator hang. But having your mask on saves time, no need to put on mask, adjust it, pull over hood, strap on helmet, or put on gloves... already done. Next for engine guys no need to set down the hose, just reach down and put regulator on. Trucker don't have to trip over mask or again waste time putting on your mask either on the ladder of on the roof.
    If you are on the apparatus, there is nothing stopping you from putting on your mask, adjusting it, and then taking it off again when you get out of the apparatus. I dont know about you, but I dont have the range of sight with a mask on than off. Also, if you have your mask on , you SHOULD have a hood on, further keeping you from doing a complete size-up. Size-up isnt all about looking around, sight, smell and sound have alot to do with size up. Also, if its taking you more than 20 seconds to put a mask, hood, helmet and gloves on, you need more practice. 20-30 seconds worth of putting a mask on is a small price to pay for a full and complete size up.

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    Never heard of that.....but how much time can you possibly save? It takes me maybe 5 to 10 seconds to mask up after forcing the door. Seems a little excessive to me.

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    Originally posted by MattyJ
    Never heard of that.....but how much time can you possibly save? It takes me maybe 5 to 10 seconds to mask up after forcing the door. Seems a little excessive to me.
    20-30 seconds is really giving everyone the benefit of the doubt here. In all reality it should only take like you said, less than 10-15

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    There's nothing wrong with waiting until you get to the door to mask up, I do it sometimes and would say most wait. I do think the time you save is more than 5 to 10 seconds, I'd say 20 to 30 seconds is more like it. If you don't think that's a lot next time you make a fire wait 20 seconds before following the first guy in.

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    Originally posted by ruffneck104
    If you don't think that's a lot next time you make a fire wait 20 seconds before following the first guy in.
    No one ever said that it isnt alot of time in a fire situation. My point being that I would rather spend that extra 20 seconds and be certain about my size up than save the few seconds at the door.

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    If its taking you more than 10 to 15 seconds to put your mask on...like 30 seconds...you need to practice more.

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    With gloves on, I can don my Scott's mask, pull up the hood and slap on the helmet (no strap) in 5 seconds. A couple extra seconds if I stumble with the hood. Point is, it should not take anybody 30 seconds to gear up at the door. I feel that having your gloves on before hand save time. Oh yeah, no mask on while enroute for me.

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    You guys are getting hung up on the 30 seconds. It shouldn't take that long. But besides time there are other advantages as well. This is just a personal trick some use, lol, sheesh to each their own.

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    First of all don't go on air until you need it, duh. Just let your regulator hang.
    This has been a thorn in the side of our more senior guys. Our local training facility has been teaching probies to be fully masked, hooded, helmeted, and strapped before coming off a rig. Every thing BUT the regulator. In my mind, this is one more thing for a probie to fumble with. We have seen at training events regulators not mounted right, guys trying to put them on backwards, etc.

    We try to re-train them the way the dept. operates and keep stressing that they need to practice, practice, practice.

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