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    Post Ford Escape Hybrid

    I found this "dial" under the rear mat in the trunk section of the Ford Escape Hybrid. I was able to turn the dial some before the sales person caught me playing with it. The sales person from Ford at the car show had no idea what it was or that the dial was even under the mat. I am assuming that if you move the dial to [shipping service] the 300 volt system will be disabled. I should have taken a picture of the whole trunk area but the hybrid battery appeared to be totally enclosed with no access to it, I guess this is a good thing. If anyone has more information on this item please let us know.
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    Thanks, Nathan

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    Great find! It'd be interesting to see what the manufacturer says about it....
    Luke

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    I was just about to post something of this nature when I found this. Today I was at the North American International Auto Show at the Cobo Center in Detroit, MI. Just as I walked in, the Ford Escape Hybrid was there, I was also curious to how you would disable the car's electrical system if it was involved in an accident. One rep I talked to said that all Ford vehicles are equipped with inertia switches for their fuel tnaks which will automatically diasble a fuel pump if the vehicle is involved in a crash. He told me that in addition to the inertia switch for the fuel pump, the Escape Hybrid, has an Inertia switch for the battery which will also automatically disable the battery in the event of a crash. He didn't say much more but I wasn't sure if responders should trust the inertia switch or what.

    Does anyone know anything more about this vehicle and its unique power system?
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    This is for Toyota but it kinda refers to the inertia switch.

    http://trucks.about.com/cs/safetyiss...d_accident.htm
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    Default Ford Escape ERG

    Hello!

    Don't know exactly but I think the Emergency Response Guide for the Ford Escape could answer your questions.

    http://www.firegraphics.org/ERG/Ford...brid%20ERG.pdf
    Jorg Heck
    Moditech Rescue Solutions B.V.
    http://www.moditech.com

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    Do a search on the forums and you will find just about every type of Hybrid vehicle emergency response guide. You can also contact Ford, Honda, Toyota etc and they will send a response guide to you. We have a book devoted to these cars - get on scene of a MVC and it could be nasty if you dont know where to cut or pry!
    Dave

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    Interesting posts... the hidden switch is a nice feature, but when you need to get to it, it will likely be twisted up inside of a mangled piece of metal from the collision. I did notice that removing the 12-volt battery also disables the high voltage system, so that would be what I would look at. No new skills to learn there.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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    Hi MetalMedic!

    Disconnecting the 12-volt-battery is not the solution on every hybrid vehicle, that's the problem. On some cars it is possible that the dc-dc-converter also powers the electrical system of the car. That's the problem.

    Here in germany there are only 3 diffrent hybrid-vehicles available, I know that there are a few more in the USA and I also try to be familiar with these types. When you take a look at the different ERGs their are many things that are the same, especially the emergency guidlines.

    The hybrid vehicles on our roads ARE safe! They will not get the permission by our DOT when they where not and the manufacture will not release a car which is dangerous by design! (The Toyota Prius just got 5-stars in EuroNCAP.) When you look at the guidlines you will see that the electrical system of all hybrids is shut off in case of an accident (with airbag deployment), I don't think that there are many scenes where the electrical system is still running with the patient trapped in the car! Be alert that also EMS personal could get in touch with hybrids in medical emergencys, they could find intact cars, the only problem is that they don't hear the motor and the car could move. But they are able do disable the vehicle very fast by switching of the ignition.

    In the other cases there are very simple rules to follow, here is MY summary, I think Ron Shaw of www.extrication.com uses similar rules:

    * Identify that the car involved in the accident is a hybrid vehicle (the 1st big problem)

    * Chock wheels, stabilize car

    * Handbreak, Turn into Park, Switch of the ignition

    * Disconnect the 12-v-battery

    * Do not touch or damaged "high voltage" parts (orange colored), these parts are NOT in our normal cutting zones.

    * If it is not possible to turn of the ignition use the ERGs to find out what other options are available. Be prepared, the ERGs should be available for this case!

    * Do not damage the battery or touch a damaged battery


    Did I forget something important?
    Jorg Heck
    Moditech Rescue Solutions B.V.
    http://www.moditech.com

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    Originally posted by JorgHeck
    Hi MetalMedic!

    Disconnecting the 12-volt-battery is not the solution on every hybrid vehicle, that's the problem. On some cars it is possible that the dc-dc-converter also powers the electrical system of the car. That's the problem.

    I never indicated that it was the solution on EVERY hybrid. However, from the information I gleaned from the link you posted, it appears to be ONE solution for the Ford Escape hybrid. I certainly was not advocating that as a "fix all" for these types of vehicles. However, it is a decent starting place for ANY vehcile that you are trying to make safe.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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    Your right! I don't want to say that YOU said this as a solution for every hybrid. It's a good point on every accident to disconntect the battery and it's possible that the problem is not solved after disconnecting one battery, because 1. it could be a hybrid or 2. it could have to batterys.
    Jorg Heck
    Moditech Rescue Solutions B.V.
    http://www.moditech.com

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    Jorg try this link www.firegraphics.org/erg.htm It has a lot of useful info on Hybrids. You are currect on the disconnect the battery - but if you read the guide it recommends to kill the main power and also pull the fuses in the engine copartment. In a perfect world these vehicles would be shut off in an accident - unfortunatly the world is not perfect and neither are the creators of the vehicles. If its my butt on the line the vehicle will be neutralized PERIOD!
    Hope the info helps
    Dave

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    Anyone had any crashes yet with a hybrid and had to deal with the materials that are in the batteries? Anything interesting in that regard?
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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    I have tried to attach a photo from my presentation on Hybrids that shows four of the High Voltage (HV) Battery switches on the cars today. Mind you that Toyota STRONGLY recommends you have linemens gloves before you operate the switch.
    There are 3 ways to disable the HV on a hybrids. The easiest is to turn the power off and remove the key (if it has one). The second way is to disconnect the negative side of the 12 volt battery or go under the hood and remove the circuit breakers (fuses). Doesn't matter which one, remove them all! The last way is to access the HV battery switch as in the pictures.
    Ford does have inertia switches as well as a thermal switch. Others have switches that disable the HV if the front airbags deploy. There are also swiches that deactivate the HV if a HV wire grounds to the body. There are swiches that disable the HV if one of the HV wires come loose.
    Although Hybrid vehicle high voltage varies from 45 volts to 325 volts depending on the manufacturer the High voltage is not my biggest concern!! The fact that the one thing that all these vehicles have in common is that they go into "GCM". "GCM" is what could have the potential to harm unwary responders. "GCM" is "Golf Cart Mode". All these vehicles shut off the gasoline engine when they come to a stop. If this vehicle is not disabled in one of the aforementioned ways it will accelerate forward or in reverse in the occupant puts their foot on the accelerator. Think about some one that may be slightly disoriented (stroke, diabetes, drugs or bumped their head). There is no engine running to warn you. Stay away from the ends.
    Last thing. Toyota Prius does not use a "KEY". Its key looks like a remote keyless door entry control. And to further cloud the picture some of them don't have to be in the ignition. Their "SMART". I'll try to add a picture of that soon.

    I own a 2005 Toyota Prius.
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    One Week ago we had a Ford rep bring this Ford Escape Hybrid to our firehouse. The Ford rep stated that disconnecting the 12 volt battery will not solve any of our problems when cutting through a high voltage wire. He stated that you must disconnect the rear dial or a shut off switch behind the gas motor. If you have rear and front end damage and can't get to the main shut offs, there are two inertia switches on the passenger's side. I would recommend talking to your local Ford dealer to get a rep out with this new hybrid. They said that this hybrid is different from every other hybrid, and it is better to see this in person than to read about it.

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    Originally posted by FFDCAR15
    One Week ago we had a Ford rep bring this Ford Escape Hybrid to our firehouse. The Ford rep stated that disconnecting the 12 volt battery will not solve any of our problems when cutting through a high voltage wire.
    I doubt that anything will solve the problem of cutting through a high voltage wire. Even if you turn off the rear switch, there is still a set of energized batteries in the vehicle that are connected by wires.

    However, in the Emergency Response Guide for the Escape Hybrid on page #10 it goes through the steps to take when approaching a damaged vehicle. The second step listed is disconnecting the negative cable from the 12V battery, which Ford claims will also disconnect the high voltage. Removing the Service Disconnect Switch is the third step.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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    The Ford rep stated that their recommendation is that you go to the rear first, disconnect the dial, pull it out, and the person that pulls it out either gives it to the IC or puts it in their bunker pants so nobody reenergizes the car. By taking this dial out, Ford says it completely turns the battery off. If you don't beleive me, talk to Ford.

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    Originally posted by FFDCAR15
    If you don't beleive me, talk to Ford.
    Down Sheba!!! I never said I didn't believe you.. and I never said to NOT perform that task. I was just restating that the "FORD" response guide did, in fact, indicate that removing the 12V battery connection does disable the high voltage.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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    FFDCAR15,
    How are you going to get to that battery switch in the "Escape" or any other Hybrid with a Peterbuilt parked 3 ft. into the back end. There is more than 1 way to skin this cat. You have several options. Download all the ERG's from Firegraphics.org and read them. The Manufacturers make it pretty clear.
    This High Voltage (HV) is different than what we are used to thinking about in the 12 volt system. The HV is not grounded to the vehicle. If your working on your 240 volt electric dryer and flip the circuit breaker off first you open the circuit. You can then move the wires all you want without concern. Hybrids are similar. You open the circuit by turning off the key or pushing the power button, the HV is disabled. Likewise by removing the negative 12 volt battery cable you open the switch. If its the front end thats involved the battery switch would be a good choice.
    Keep in mind cutting an Orange (HV) cable, energized or not, would be the last thing I would consider. They are insulated and isolated in a plastic loom under the vehicle. Work around them.

    PS I've had Ford engineers in my class in Cincinnati.
    "Don't say much so when I do.."

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