1. #1
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    Exclamation What The @*&! Is It?

    Ron or anyone else for that matter. Perhaps you can answer a quick question. The other night is the raging blizzard that we had in the Northeast, at 1:06 am, we were called to an accident that had a Chey 3/4 ton, 4-door, 4x4 pickup slammed up against a bunch of trees on the passengers side with the truck listing at about a 45-50 degree angle. Passenger was severely pinned with heavy lower extremidy injuries. We were able to remove the passenger door(s) to access him and found that he was pinned from the hips down. His hips were holding him between the trees and what was left of the door frame/A-post.To make a long story short, one option was to cut the seat-back and remove it therefore allowing him to slide dirctly back and out onto a board. We removed all the padding and tried to cut the 1 1/2" square seat-back post and we didn't even burr up the material! What in God's name are they making "Seat-Back Frames" out of????? The truck was relatively new.
    Let me know so that we can be more prepared for this in the future. I certainly know all about the door beams, dash beams, roof supports, etc., but, seat-back frames I have heard nothing of.
    Thanks for any info!!

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    MetalMedic's Avatar
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    WHat were you using to try to cut it with?

    Any pictures would be very interesting to see as well.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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    We were using a set of Hurst Extractor Cutters. (or trying to)

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    Originally posted by MaximI
    We were using a set of Hurst Extractor Cutters. (or trying to)
    Hmmm.. one would have thought that would have done the job. It will be interesting to see if anyone has some ideas on what the seat frame is made from.

    On the other side of the coin, not to sound critical - just a suggestion - when was the last time that your hydraulic system was serviced by a qualified technician? There is always the possibility that there may be something obstructing fluid flow (unusally a dislodged "O" ring) or that the pump itself could be in need of adjustment. Something to rule out if you are not finding any other obvious answers.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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    One problem is they could of been after market seats. Did a search and the most I could find in that regards states frame is made from Heavy Duty Steel. Didn't see anything on the Chevy website as to what material is used in seat construction.
    NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
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    It may not be the cutter or the material, rather the shape of the material. Most seat backs are mild steel, not hardened. Sometimes O style cutters have difficulty cutting material that has curves are is angled, like seatback supports. The tool has a tendency to twist and bind between the blades. This often happens with brake pedals as well and they are also made with mild steel.

    I would start with the pump pressure as metal suggests, making sure it is putting out 5000 psi.

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    Hello!

    I've heard of seatbacks made of high strength steel, but I did not know if this is fact in the vehicle you talk about.

    We have cut several seatbacks last years with no problems, but I think you need some cutting technique. If you cut the seatback from the side your tool is likely to rotate so its better to cut in an 90 angle to the seatback. Its also important to cut deep between the cutter blades (near the central bolt), so you'll have the biggest force. Another mistake I've seen very often is that the user of the tool gives up to fast, so that the pump was not able to creat the maximum pressure.

    Don't get me wrong, I don't think that you made one of the mistakes above, but these are some of my thoughts that came into my mind when I read your question. It could be that the HSS was the problem.
    Jorg Heck
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    Lightbulb

    Let me address all of the concerns that have been listed so far.

    1. MetalMedic - Our unit has been completely serviced within the last
    year. We are going to have it checked again of course
    to eliminate any mechanical problems.
    2. Ryan - These seats didn't look like after-market ones. Of course
    that doesn't mean that they were not. I'm going to try to
    find that out. Thanks.
    3. RescueMaster - I agree with the mild steel theory. That's what has
    me baffled. As the cut was started there was absolutely no
    twisting at all. The tool just seemed to stop!
    4. JorgBeck - The seatback post was 1 1/2" to 1 3/4" "square tubing"
    Cuts were attempted @ 90 degrees as you stated. The cuts
    were also seated deep within the notch of the cutter where
    the power is greatest. I tried across the flats of the
    tubing as well as across the corners of the tubing. The
    flat area should have been the weakest point. There were 4
    attempts made to cut the back. The last 2 attempts I
    purposely counted to 15. This should have produced some
    sort of result. After the 15 seconds of nothing happening
    I get a bit worried about blade failure.
    Guys, thanks for all your input, and believe me, I take nothing personal. We're all human. I am going to start by having the unit checked out thoroughly and I might even find where the vehicle is stored and try to cut it again. (If it ever stops snowing!!)These cutters have done wonders up to this point and I really need a solution. One question: It was about 0 degrees out and everything was under snow because it was snowing at about 3-4" per hour at the time of the event. Last I knew, weather was not supposed to affect the Jaws fluid, but, can It??? Thanks again!

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    Can't imagine the weather affecting the properties of your hydraulic fluid to the point where the tool would not have made what appears to be a routine cut. If anything, it should have improved it since the fluid would not be heating up as much as it cycles through the resivoir where it normally cools some.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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    I believe it is HDLA steel and a holmatro NCT cutter will cut it.

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    Originally posted by wiseguytuna
    I believe it is HDLA steel and a holmatro NCT cutter will cut it.
    You need to look a little deeper in the forum:

    http://cms.firehouse.com/forums2/sho...threadid=66166
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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