1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    21

    Default Georgia firefighter/truck accident

    OK, I have a couple of questions. Not to criticize, just wondering. The hot-shot article said this firefighter was responding to a fire call, why was she alone? I understand vol./small depts do out with what they can, but our rig does not roll with just one person. And I'm sorry, but fido's life is not worth the life of a firefighter.
    Again, just wondering??

    p.s. I am really glad to hear she did not get seriously hurt!!

  2. #2
    Forum Member
    DennisTheMenace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Washington, DC/Northern Virginia
    Posts
    3,717

    Default Re: Georgia firefighter/truck accident

    Originally posted by mwachter
    OK, I have a couple of questions. Not to criticize, just wondering. The hot-shot article said this firefighter was responding to a fire call, why was she alone? I understand vol./small depts do out with what they can, but our rig does not roll with just one person. And I'm sorry, but fido's life is not worth the life of a firefighter.
    Again, just wondering??

    p.s. I am really glad to hear she did not get seriously hurt!!
    Yep, swearving in a 30K lbs vehicle to avoid a dog is not quite bright. Glad she is relatively fine.
    Be for Peace, but don't be for the Enemy!
    -Big Russ

    Learn from the mistakes of others; you won't live long enough to make them all yourself.

    Quote Originally Posted by nyckftbl View Post
    LOL....dont you people have anything else to do besides b*tch about our b*tching?

  3. #3
    Forum Member
    DennisTheMenace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Washington, DC/Northern Virginia
    Posts
    3,717

    Default

    Next time........HIT THE DOG!
    Be for Peace, but don't be for the Enemy!
    -Big Russ

    Learn from the mistakes of others; you won't live long enough to make them all yourself.

    Quote Originally Posted by nyckftbl View Post
    LOL....dont you people have anything else to do besides b*tch about our b*tching?

  4. #4
    District Chief
    distchief60b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    6,413

    Default

    In answer to the first question....In a small department you do what you have to do. I know a few volunteer departments here that often leave with one person and the rest show up in cars or whatever... But they get it done. In this case, it is probably a good thing she was alone!

    Yep....I am thinking that I would have hit the dog!..

    She is lucky....better count her blessing or play that day on the lottery or something!
    Last edited by captstanm1; 01-24-2005 at 01:36 PM.
    09-11 .. 343 "All Gave Some..Some Gave ALL" God Bless..R.I.P.
    ------------------------------
    IACOJ Minister of Southern Comfort
    "Purple Hydrant" Recipient (3 Times)
    BMI Investigator
    ------------------------------
    The comments, opinions, and positions expressed here are mine. They are expressed respectfully, in the spirit of safety and progress. They do not reflect the opinions or positions of my employer or my department.

  5. #5
    Junior Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Erie, Pa, USA
    Posts
    7

    Default

    One thing my dad taught me was its easier to replace the dog, then lose the rig.

    However, i dont think responding one is ever good. I mean, i know some vollie departments are small. But what happens i f no one else is there. YOu can't run a one man truck or engine. It's four out the door around here, and it's all vollie.

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Crisb1419's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    East of the Arch
    Posts
    251

    Default Hit the Dog..

    On one of my first FD test,one of the questions on the written exam was. If you are responding to a call with lights and sirens and a dog runs in your path what do you do?
    (a) Slowly apply brakes, and steer away from the dog
    (b) Slam on brakes at all cost to avoid the dog.
    (c) Nothing hit the dog.
    (d) Steer the truck away from the dog.

    The answer was C. Hit the dog.

    Always thought that was a funny question, but in the 14 years I have been on the job. Have yet to have it happen. I must make to much noise with the siren and air horn that they do not want to run in front of me.
    FF/Instructor
    "Train as you life depends on it, IT DOES!!"
    IACOJ
    MABAS 32

  7. #7
    Forum Member
    MetalMedic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    The Home of Smucker's Jelly
    Posts
    1,266

    Default

    It is easy to say "hit the dog", but I am afraid that when an object suddenly appears in your path, your instincts might cause you to swerve before you have time to "think" about what to do to deal with that object. We all can probably agree that hitting the dog would be the better choice, but I can't say for sure that I am 100% certain that I wouldn't grab the wheel to swerve before I realized I wasn't driving a car. That is why I tend to be one of the slowest drivers on my department (at least I feel like I am)... it is easier to correct that swerve if you are going 10 MPH slower.

    I have had to take a rig out by myself a few times. But when I do, I pretty much run the lights and sirens while obeying the traffic laws to the letter. I feel much more comfortable with someone in the "officer's seat" to help me watch intersections and blind spots.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber
    StLRes2cue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    ..........
    Posts
    407

    Default

    Originally posted by DennisTheMenace
    Next time........HIT THE DOG!
    Funny...but very true.

  9. #9
    Forum Member
    nmfire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Maryland (DC Suburb)
    Posts
    5,738

    Default

    I might apply some braking, but it should be "maintain control at all costs" rather than "avoid the dog at all costs". If you can safely avoid the animal, that's great. If not, well the owner should have put the animal on a leesh.
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

  10. #10
    Forum Member
    DennisTheMenace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Washington, DC/Northern Virginia
    Posts
    3,717

    Default

    Training and EXPERIANCE will be the deciding factor if the dog is to live or die. Lack of training and experiance, and the dog lives but the driver can be in serious trouble as demonstarted here.
    Be for Peace, but don't be for the Enemy!
    -Big Russ

    Learn from the mistakes of others; you won't live long enough to make them all yourself.

    Quote Originally Posted by nyckftbl View Post
    LOL....dont you people have anything else to do besides b*tch about our b*tching?

  11. #11
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    West Central Michigan
    Posts
    62

    Default

    gdhickster3 wrote

    However, i dont think responding one is ever good. I mean, i know some vollie departments are small. But what happens i f no one else is there. YOu can't run a one man truck or engine. It's four out the door around here, and it's all vollie.
    Sounds like you are spoiled when it comes to your staffing. Not that it's a bad thing but until you've been on the other side I don't think you should make a statement that makes it sound as if every vollie dept. can do it. Would love nothing more than to "four out the door" but in our situation it is impossible at this time.


    captstanm1 wrote

    In answer to the first question....In a small department you do what you have to do. I know a few volunteer departments here that often leave with one person and the rest show up in cars or whatever... But they get it done. In this case, it is probably a good thing she was alone!

    Agreed...This is how it works in quite a few areas in this country. We end up doing as best we can with what we have to work with.

  12. #12
    Forum Member
    RLFD14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    562

    Default

    About a month ago I didn't even flinch as I took out a rabbit while driving a tanker. Sorry, Bugs. Even bus drivers know this drill, there is no animal worth saving in exchange for risking wrecking the rig and hurting your passengers. How much more valuable and timely are our services when someone has dialed 911 to ask for them? Sorry, but splat it and keep going.

    This should be mentioned in all driver training courses, even for 16 years old in driver's ed, not just for us.

  13. #13
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    West Central Michigan
    Posts
    62

    Default

    RLFD14

    Good point. Not swerving for an animal should be taught in driver's ed. classes and by parents. Here in Michigan, car deer accidents are very common but swerving to avoid one lots of times causes the operator to roll over or hit a tree causing an injury and more damage to the vehicle than hitting the deer.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register