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  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber mohican's Avatar
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    Default ems board at it again?



  2. #2
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    This is a new topic on the EMS Forum too:
    http://cms.firehouse.com/forums2/sho...threadid=66457

    For EMT-Basics, it's really not that big of a change.
    FTM-PTB-DTRT

  3. #3
    Forum Member MetalMedic's Avatar
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    Ok, read it.. what is the concern? I think an EMT-Basic (and I am one of those) has been permitted to do more than is practical in Ohio. When I became an EMT, I wanted to be able to stabalize and transport patients. I never had a desire to give medications or perform intubations. I fully support the paramedics who have that desire and always felt that the Basic can support the medic by taking care of the ABCs and the routine things like vital signs and writing reports. My fear is that with too many people trained to do some of these skills, no one on a crew will have the opportunity to practice them enough to remain proficient at them.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

  4. #4
    MembersZone Subscriber mohican's Avatar
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    is the elimination of the intermediate level part of this?

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    This is a National Scope of Practice, not an Ohio Document. The EMS Board simply put out a press release inviting comments from Ohio EMS Professionals. I am sure this will someday lead to changes, but it is pretty premature to blame the State for making more changes. My guess is that they probaly received very litte input from EMS providers in this State.

    Jason Kinley, Lieutenant
    Xenia Fire Division

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber mohican's Avatar
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    Originally posted by emstrainer01
    This is a National Scope of Practice, not an Ohio Document. The EMS Board simply put out a press release inviting comments from Ohio EMS Professionals. I am sure this will someday lead to changes, but it is pretty premature to blame the State for making more changes. My guess is that they probaly received very litte input from EMS providers in this State.

    Jason Kinley, Lieutenant
    Xenia Fire Division
    I've heard from someone on the EMS board that the state is considering the national scope of practice changes, pretty much verbatim.

    "Interoperability" is the flavor of the month

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    My point was that it is too early to start blaming the State of Ohio for a National Document that has only been released to generate discussion. While they may adopt the "FINAL" National Scope of Practice to remain uniform, it would be a first for OHIO !! Just take a look at the hatchet job they have done to the EMT-I Curriculum and you will see a fine example of State Government .... There is a National EMT-I Curriculum, but Ohio decided to chop it up and Re-Invent it ... Maybe the EMS Board has matured enough to take on these challenging issues and make some common sense decisions ...

    Jason Kinley, Lieutenant
    Xenia Fire Division

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber mohican's Avatar
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    As a rural vollie chief, I give the state about 3/4th of an attaboy for the intermediate. It advances the level of care without the time/expense of full blown medics.

    I do take your point that it is early in the process.

  9. #9
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    .... I support the advances in the Standard of Care for the EMT-I, but as an EMS Instructor it is almost impossible to deliver the EMT-I Course in 130 hours. I am sure as a Rural/Vollie Chief you do not have the money to throw away so your personnel can try to pass the NREMT-I Test 3 or 4 times. Look around the State, most EMT-I programs are operating on a consent decree for dismal passing rates in the EMT-I testing. I support the Curriculum, but the limitation on hours was imposed without proper evaluation. The committee has re-convened and we will probaly see some changes ...

    Jason Kinley, Lieutenant
    Xenia Fire Division

  10. #10
    MembersZone Subscriber mohican's Avatar
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    Originally posted by emstrainer01
    .... I support the advances in the Standard of Care for the EMT-I, but as an EMS Instructor it is almost impossible to deliver the EMT-I Course in 130 hours. I am sure as a Rural/Vollie Chief you do not have the money to throw away so your personnel can try to pass the NREMT-I Test 3 or 4 times. Look around the State, most EMT-I programs are operating on a consent decree for dismal passing rates in the EMT-I testing. I support the Curriculum, but the limitation on hours was imposed without proper evaluation. The committee has re-convened and we will probaly see some changes ...

    Jason Kinley, Lieutenant
    Xenia Fire Division
    I thing the added intermediate curriculum is good

    And I'll agree that the training needs tweeked

    I can quote you chapter and verse on the drug list, but for example we weren't shown in our bridge how to use a nebulizer, I had a medic on a neighboring departnment show me.

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    I cannot talk about the bridge course because I was fortunate enough to take the intermediate class last year as the full course. I was very pleased with the class and the content and felt like the instructor did a good job explaining the finer points of most subjects. I do think the cardiac section was a little short. We spent two evening classes and one saturday class discussing rythim strips and I was not comfortable with that. I have since bought a couple of books on the subject to try to better my understanding on the subject. Out of a class of approx. 32 I beleive 9 of us passed the first time and the majority of the rest have tested three times without success. It is hard to work all of that curriculum in 130 hours if the student is not willing to put nearly the same amount of time studying on their own.

  12. #12
    MembersZone Subscriber mohican's Avatar
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    bump

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