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  1. #1
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    Default Do We Need More Medics?????

    According to a USA Article March 1, 2005, more paramedics does
    not equal more lives saved. Here's the article:

    http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/...ms-cover_x.htm

    Captain Bob

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    Last edited by CaptBob; 03-02-2005 at 12:15 PM.


  2. #2
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    Default

    hey capt link is not working

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    Default

    This has been brought up before in many different studies. You must remember that this only studies cardiac arrests. It doesnt encompass all the other things that paramedic skills may be utilized for. For example: many cardiac arrests are secondary to an arrythmia that could be remedied with the medications that only a medic can use. In Difficulty breathing cases/asthmatics, the meds pushed by medics are sometimes the only thing that will bring a patients breathing back to normal. The cases are to numerous to count. Congestive heart failure, anaphylaxis, hypoglycemia, are just a few cases of an emergency in which a medics skills could mean life and death.

    I live in the immediate Boston area. Before I got hired by my department I worked in Boston for the privates as a Basic EMT and a Medic. I can attest to how well the Boston system works. But there is no mention of the fact that Boston has some of the most renowned hospitals in the world. Also, there is no place in Boston where you are any longer than a 7 minute ambulance ride to a trauma center.

    If an engine was called to my house to care for one of my sick loved ones, I would certainly want a medic to be there. Just my honest opinion.
    "The bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them...and yet...go out to meet it." Thucydides

  5. #5
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    Default Yep!!!!

    If an engine was called to my house to care for one of my sick loved ones, I would certainly want a medic to be there.
    Yep. Me too. Being on an engine with and without a medic makes a huge difference. Experience, drugs, equipment and communication with the hospital can't be measured in tax $$$$$$$$$$.

    Captain Bob

    www.eatstress.com

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber fyrmnk's Avatar
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    Default Medics on rigs

    Here's my personal opinion. I think they have a place, but like anything, the concept can be implemented to extremes.

    In the last couple years, we went from FF/EMT only on rigs, to hiring only medics regardless of fire experience and running some ALS rigs, and now to medics preferred, but EMTs can be hired again. Just hired 7, and 6 are medics.

    Problem we've experienced is with disregarding the fire end of it (the things that will get you killed) and forcing the medic thing. We are in an area with excellent medic ambulance service, not a critical need for ALS on the rigs.

    The bad experiences I've seen in our dept. are medics that don't really want to be firemen, that just want off the meat bus so they come to the fire side (we don't have ambulances). In a few occasions, we've had medics that don't function worth a crap on fires or know the tools on the truck, regardless of completing rookie class and remedial training. One had to be let go because he couldn't function beyond the medic stuff, regardless of the training he was assigned to become an effective fireman, and direct company officer directed training day to day.

    This forces many company officers to be babysitters on fires instead of concentrating on their jobs in some instances.

    Again, I think there is a need in many areas, but the focus should be on good proficient firemen on the rigs first. Yes, medical calls make up most runs anymore, but they aren't the life threat to us (usually).
    FTM-PTB-RFB
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  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber mohican's Avatar
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    Default

    Medics are valuable, when you need them. duke44jb has a good point, they do provide for a elevated level of care.

    But: in reviewing our ems runs for the last few years, saying a medic was needed even 10% of the time would be heavily slanted in favor of medics. In a rural community, served by a volunteer system, you have more bang for you buck getting 6 EMTs through school for the price of one medic.

    the vast majority of the time,having more people available with a comprehensive basic or intermediate program is of more value than having a few medics. And we do have medics available through mutual aid.

  8. #8
    Forum Member ThNozzleman's Avatar
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    Default

    But: in reviewing our ems runs for the last few years, saying a medic was needed even 10% of the time would be heavily slanted in favor of medics.
    Depends on how many runs you make. When you start pushing into the thousands of runs a year, that 10% begins to add up to a lot of citizens.

  9. #9
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    Default study draws unjustified conclusions

    From what I read in the article, the study only showed a CORRELATION between departments with lower EMT-P staffing and higher cardiac arrest survivability rates. It did not prove that the lower EMT-P staffing played a CAUSAL role. In other words, the higher survivability rate in cardiac arrest patients is not necessarily the direct result of lower EMT-P staffing. There are other contributing factors (one of them mentioned in the article, a populace that is largely trained in CPR) that may not have been considered in the study.

    This is a common flaw in statistical analysis. An example of this is a study that was done showing that birth rates in certain areas of Scandanavian countries skyrocketed during the period of time when storks migrated to those areas. One could use that correlation to argue that storks really do bring babies. But further analysis showed the increase in birth rates was due to the fact that many of the men who worked in the fishing villages returned home at the same time after being out to sea during fishing season. Amazingly enough, nine months later, the birth rate increased.

    Beware faulty studies, they can greatly mislead people into endorsing bad ideas.correlation

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