1. #1
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    Default On-Spot Tire Chains

    Is there any deptment with on-spot tire chains who have had any problems with them in the snow or ice. Which is better on-spot or tire chains. A local Chief wants to purchase tire chains for there new Engine that has on-spots. He has never used the on-spots. We have on-spots on both of our Engines.

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    We have three trucks with them and no problems. A department in our county did have an accident with a truck on a ice covered hill. I am not sure if they had on-spot's or not. However they lost control going down a ice covered road at literally 1 mile and hour partly because the front tires had ZERO TRACTION. I doubt that would have helped much but unless you do like some Municipal plow trucks and put the tire chains on FRONT and REAR you will have issues on ice.

    On-spots will help you most of the time but the reality is that you have to look at what you need for your area.

    I remember in January 1995 driving our new tanker back from the factory and seeing State Highway plows around the Great Lakes with chains all the way around staged at u-turns and loaded with sand. If it was a bad day it would be one thing but it was dry roads, with an ice storm predicted in a few hours..... my point being you may want a full set of chains in that situation if it occurs regularly in your area.

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    What are On-Spots? No, wait, better question....what's snow?
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream — and I hope you don't find this too crazy — is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    — C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

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    On-Spots are tire chains. You just have to be careful with them. If you go over 35 mph, the life of the chains are reduced. You go 40 with them on, you have half of the life, 45 and you have 1/4 the life, 50 is 1/8th, etc.
    -Bozz

    Air Force Medic

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    On-Spots work well in snow up to about 4 or 5 inches, any higher than that and they don't spin freely enough to get under the wheels to make any traction.

    They are a huge convenience over putting tire chains on.

    If you regularly get snowfalls above 5 inches, get the chains.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    We also have on-spot chains on all our vehicles. Huge time saver, no down time to install chains, you engage them when you need them, disengage when you don't.

    Also a huge plus when parts of your district have been plowed and other parts still have 6 inches of snow, you can engage them as needed instead of either slipping on the snow or banging your chains on pavement as you go into and out of plowed sections.

    For the benefit of anyone who is not familiar with how they work...

    Basically there is a cylinder mounted just inside of and just in front of the tire. It has four (?) lengths of chain hanging from the lower edge of the cylinder, when disengaged they hang up and harmessly out of the way. When engaged, the on-spots drop down and begin to spin, which flings the chain lengths under the tires. If you get stuck or are slipping before you engage them it is still no problem, as the chains are thrown in front of your spinning tire they will usually get "bit" by the tire and get pulled under it, giving you traction again.

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    Hopefully if you are driving in conditions that warrant tire chains you are not driving over 35 MPH.

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    Hi All,

    We have "On-spot" snow chains on all of trucks. They work great for snow depths of up to 5-6 inches. Most of the time after a snow storm the main road that the fire station is on has very little snow on it, however most of the secondary roads are still slightly snow covered or packed down with snow. This is where they work out great. As you turn the corner onto a secondary road just “flip the switch” and you have good traction. Our SOP's are that snow fall depths over 5" inches of snow, we are to put the full wrap chains on. As soon as secondary roads are plowed we remove the full wrap. We have been operating this way since the mid-90's with no problems. We run both the full wrap and "on-spots" at the same time during deep snows. The full wrap are on the outside tire, where as the "On-spots" work on the inner tire.

    Prior to the installation of "On-spot" chains we were throwing links and damaging fenders on the rigs every winter because we had to ride on clean roads (blacktop) prior to driving on the secondary snow covered roads and would wear out the cross links pretty fast.

    I would recommend getting the "On-spots" and still keep the full wrap chains for the deeper snow storms. I'd rather get there than try to explain why we got stuck.

    Hope this helps.

    Be safe,

    Captain Lou

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    all of our engines, our heavy rescue and our truck have on spots. If the snow is getting deeper than 6 inches the full tire chains are installed (except on the truck as it has tandem rears with a locking differential and traction control). I wouldn't spec a truck without onspots in a region that sees snow. As was already stated on here, I think they are a great convenience so that you do not have to install full chains if the snow is going to be under 6 inches.

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    Default on spots

    as others have said the work good under the proper conditions. And definitly better than having to put on chains. I must say how ever if you are driving over 35 with onspot on , youn are not following the manufactuers require ments and directions. . You need to engage at 10 MPH and Maximum speed of 35. The are also very reasonably priced . I just had a set installed on an older pumper for around $ 2800 installed.

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    Thanks for all the info.

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    Default Onspot Chains

    Hello,

    We have a video available on the proper use of Onspots if you would like to have it. Please do NOt construe my replay as a sales call. I am just trying to offer up the correct use of the product.
    Pat Freyer - President - Onspot chains 800-766-7768

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    Pat-

    If anyone criticizes a vendor for providing info on how to use their products in a public forum, well - I can't say the words I would like to use here.

    I think there's nothing wrong with these guys here to support their product. In fact, I like that he's here supporting it. We don't run OnSpots, really don't need them, but I think it's cool Pat's here supporting his customers.

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