1. #1
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    Question Strange Spring Season in the East??........

    The Mid Atlantic area has had several wet years, but some long range forcasts show a drying trend setting in. I'm not sold on that theory, as the past weeks have been, well, strange. Here in Central Maryland, January had a half inch of rain above normal, February was a inch and a half short. Warm weather in the First half of January, with some Fires happening. Mid month snow ended that. Things stayed just wet enough to avoid more than the usual handful of backyard grass Fires, until Monday 3-7. On Monday, Winds from the Southwest pushed Central Maryland temps to 70 degrees, and Fires were popping up everywhere. Tuesday Rain, then Snow. And much colder temps. Anyone got any thoughts on this?
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    65 degrees here on Monday....and tonight, overnight...it dropped to 14 degrees with 40 mph winds. Go figure.

    The weather will depend on how the jetstream sets up during the early spring. In El Nino years, the mid atlantic tends to have dry spring/summer months. 2005 seems to be a moderate El Nino...which would indicate moderate drought in the east.

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    By ANNIE BERGMAN
    Associated Press Writer
    LITTLE ROCK (AP) - Spring is more lion-like than lamb-gentle in
    Arkansas' forests when the woods are dry. The Arkansas Forestry
    Commission reported 51 fires that burned more than 1,200 acres of
    forest and grass lands over the weekend.
    Though wildfires occur in every month, they are most common in
    the spring and late summer, with March and April seeing the
    majority of wildfire activity.
    According to the commission's website, there were a total of 781
    fires during March and April in 2003, accounting for more than
    16,000 of the total 22,945 acres that burned that year.
    Despite the number of fires over the weekend, there are no burn
    bans in effect in Arkansas right now, but there is a "moderate
    wildfire danger" for 16 counties in the state.
    Don McBride, fire chief for the commission, said a moderate
    wildfire danger indicates "a slightly elevated risk of a fire
    occuring, but not a fast-moving fire."
    McBride said there had been 151 fires in Arkansas since the
    first of the year, slightly below the average. "We're ahead in
    rainfall this year, so there is plenty of moisture to work with,"
    he said.
    The weather plays a significant role during the wildfire season,
    and the "prognosis is good," for this year. according to John
    Lewis, a senior meteorologist for the National Weather Service in
    North Little Rock.
    Lewis said that, although there is not a lot of moisture in
    fronts currently approaching Arkansas from the northwest, the
    latest long-term outlook shows that Arkansas will be at or above
    normal precipitation for March, April and May.
    Forestry Commission spokesman Mark Reed said March and April see
    the most fires because of spring cleaning. "People are cleaning up
    (and burning trash) and not being real careful," he said.
    Debris burning, which is what the commission calls burning
    leaves and trash piles, "is one of the highest causes of wildfires
    in Arkansas," Reed said.
    To prevent such fires, he said, "don't burn on windy days, stay
    with your fire, have precautionary rakes and water hoses there and
    just use a lot common sense."


    (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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