1. #26
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    Sounds like you could save the money and not buy the blue light then. Drive safe! There is a reason we dont (shouldnt) speed like crazy and blow through red lights and stop signs. Get your self and your crew to the scene safe.

  2. #27
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    Default Re: Another thought

    Originally posted by achief15
    Use your blue (or red) light as a courtesy light, and make it to the call safely.
    HA.. in NC if someone came up behind me w/ a blue light I'd pull over.. only because only the police have blue lights. Anyone else would be charged with impersonating a police officer. But I know, it's a North/Mid-West thing. Is it only the South that uses red lights?

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    here in michigan we use red lights, no blue lights on any of our trucks, even POV's. red and whites only.

  4. #29
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    Around here the Blue light can mean:

    a. You're a snowplow
    b. You're drinking light beer
    c. You're on "Special"

    Which one applies to you?
    Never argue with an Idiot. They drag you down to their level, and then beat you with experience!

    IACOJ

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    I agree with what all you guys are saying and that it is best to take your time and get to the scene in one piece. I was looking at how i started this thread and i noticed i had failed to mention that my chief was not 100% certain and it would be best to make sure. as i said we do have guys that have used these lights that have never had a permit so this is new to us all. Mine is still in the box and that is where it is going to stay.

  6. #31
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    Originally posted by mcaldwell
    Around here the Blue light can mean:

    a. You're a snowplow
    b. You're drinking light beer
    c. You're on "Special"

    Which one applies to you?
    You forgot
    d: you work at K-Mart!
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

  7. #32
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    I don't think DOT or whatever you mean has anything to do with it. It is a State Police rules that governs lights for volley's and well as paid depts.
    In New York, the Blue Lights are covered under the Motor Vehicle and Traffic Laws. They are courtesy lights, just identifying you as a volunteer firefighter. They do not allow you to go any faster that posted speed limits (although many do), or disobey any other traffic laws. Also in New York, the Blue Light is supposed to be exclusively for volunteer firefighters.
    "The uniform is supposed to say something about you. You get it for nothing, but it comes with a history, so do the right thing when you're in it."
    Battalion Chief Ed Schoales
    from 'Report from Ground Zero' pg 149
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    This is what i found in the codes for iowa in regard to lights.

    321.423 Flashing lights.
    1. Definitions. As used in this section, unless the context otherwise requires:

    a. "Emergency medical care provider" means as defined in section 147A.1.

    b. "Fire department" means a paid or volunteer fire protection service provided by a benefited fire district under chapter 357B or by a county, municipality or township, or a private corporate organization that has a valid contract to provide fire protection service for a benefited fire district, county, municipality, township or governmental agency.

    c. "Member" means a person who is a member in good standing of a fire department or a person who is an emergency medical care provider employed by an ambulance, rescue, or first response service.

    2. Prohibited lights. A flashing light on or in a motor vehicle is prohibited except as follows:

    a. On an authorized emergency vehicle.

    b. On a vehicle as a means of indicating a right or left turn, a mechanical failure, or an emergency stop or intent to stop.

    c. On a motor vehicle used by a rural mail carrier when stopping or stopped on or near a highway in the process of delivering mail, if such a light is any shade of color between white and amber and if it is mounted as a dome light on the roof of the vehicle.

    d. On a vehicle being operated under an excess size permit issued under chapter 321E.

    e. A flashing blue light on a vehicle upon which a blue light is permitted pursuant to subsection 3 of this section.

    f. A flashing white light is permitted on a vehicle pursuant to subsection 7.

    g. A white flashing strobe light mounted on a school bus as permitted under section 321.373, subsection 7.

    3. Blue light. A blue light shall not be used on any vehicle except for the following:

    a. A vehicle owned or exclusively operated by a fire department.

    b. A vehicle authorized by the chief of the fire department if the vehicle is owned by a member of the fire department, the request for authorization is made by the member on forms provided by the department, and necessity for authorization is demonstrated in the request.

    c. An authorized emergency vehicle, other than a vehicle described in paragraph "a" or "b", if the blue light is positioned on the passenger side of the vehicle and is used in conjunction with a red light positioned on the driver side of the vehicle.

    A person shall not use only a blue light on a vehicle unless the vehicle meets the requirements of paragraph "a" or "b".

    4. Expiration of authority. The authorization shall expire at midnight on the thirty-first day of December five years from the year in which it was issued, or when the vehicle is no longer owned by the member, or when the member has ceased to be an active member of the fire department or of an ambulance, rescue, or first response service, or when the member has used the blue or white light beyond the scope of its authorized use. A person issued an authorization under subsection 3, paragraph "b", shall return the authorization to the fire chief upon expiration or upon a determination by the fire chief or the department that the authorization should be revoked.

    5. When used. The certificate of authorization shall be carried at all times with the certificate of registration of the authorized vehicle and the operator of the vehicle shall not illuminate the blue or white light except in any of the following circumstances:

    a. When the member is en route to the scene of a fire or is responding to an emergency in the line of duty requiring the services of the member.

    b. When the authorized vehicle is transporting a person requiring emergency care.

    c. When the authorized vehicle is at the scene of an emergency.

    d. The use of the blue or white light in or on a private motor vehicle shall be for identification purposes only.

    So as you can see i found my answers. I know you guys must get sick of hearing questions about this so i will apologize for it now

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