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  1. #1
    Forum Member backdraft663's Avatar
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    Default Helmets on the sid of engines?

    I dont know if its just my eyes! Are there helmets mounted on the side of this engine? I have seen this a few times, and when I browsed www.fdnytrucks.com I saw some trucks doing this? I thought maybe for parades or something but on the way to a run? Whats the story behind this.

    Here is a picture for reference. At first I thought they were airpacks mounted.
    If there not hemlets, they sure do look like them.

    http://www.firehouse.com/hotshots/sl...0310_pa/13.jpg
    Ryan

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    You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You must do the thing which you think you cannot do. -Eleanor Roosevelt

    Lets not forget those lost on 9-11-01


  2. #2
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    Yes, they are helmets. And if you look above them, you will see boots also. For companies that have members respond to the scene intead of the firehouse, their gear is on the trucks. Yes, it happens in places and it even makes sense in places.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  3. #3
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    Default actually no

    Actually that is the new safe method for riding on a truck to a scene. You crawl into these little tubes and they shoot you out like mortar shells.

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    That used to be very common...on one side of the rig would be day boots, stored upside down and on the other side, coats and helmets. Out of all the apparatus operated by the 14 fire companies/fire departments in West Central Berks, I can only think of one front line rig offhand (it's a quint) on which gear is actually still carried in this way. However, it's pretty common as you move north of us, all through the "coal regions" of PA.

  5. #5
    Forum Member SpartanGuy's Avatar
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    Actually, if you look closely, right above the helmets there are four sets of turnout pants w/o boots(boots are upside down). Two black and two yellow. The boots in the yellow pants have those characteristic white tread like you see on rubber boots.
    "Captain 1 to control, retone this as a structure and notify the fire chief...."

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  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber jfTL41's Avatar
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    Yeah and the coats stored on the side generally had a horizontal red stripe from UV degradation.

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    I never said this was a good way to store gear, just a common one at one time.

  8. #8
    Forum Member backdraft663's Avatar
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    Thats neat, thats the first time I have heard of it.
    Ryan

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    You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You must do the thing which you think you cannot do. -Eleanor Roosevelt

    Lets not forget those lost on 9-11-01

  9. #9
    Forum Member fftrainer's Avatar
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    Yeah and the coats stored on the side generally had a horizontal red stripe from UV degradation.
    Dammit, you beat me to it although it was more of a purple stripe....

    Definitely not the best way to store gear, but it worked for a long time in smaller town america. My first vol dept used to operate this way (before my time, but as a kid I grew up watching it). The rig would leave with a driver and maybe one guy and Steve the plumber, and Bobby the carpenter and Mike the store owner would all leave work and meet the rig on scene. Grabbed a set of gear and went to work. If I can take one thing from it, at least they admitted that they needed gear!?!?

  10. #10
    MembersZone Subscriber dmleblanc's Avatar
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    I can remember when I was a kid that the engines had helmets hanging from hooks on the sides of the rig (was going through some old pictures yesterday and saw this). There was also a transverse compartment just behind the cab that had a long bar mounted on the ceiling, and this compartment had bunker coats on hangers (like a closet).

    When I first joined ('89) the helmets were no longer hanging on the side of the rig but it was still common practice to use the bunker gear off the truck...the transverse compartment always had several coats, 3/4 boots, helmets and gloves.

    I remember the first new truck we bought after I joined, in '92. The chief at the time believed in the old practice of carrying gear on the truck, so that truck was also spec'd with a closet bar in a transverse compartment, for hanging gear.

    Both of these trucks are still in service but we no longer carry gear on the truck...I don't believe in the practice because it's impossible to carry the right size for everyone that might show up. Bunker gear is not one-size-fits-all, after all. Also, we're much better equipped than we once were...There was a time when not everyone had a personal set of gear, so the few sets carried on the truck were put to good use...Nowadays I expect everyone to show up with their gear..
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream — and I hope you don't find this too crazy — is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    — C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

  11. #11
    MembersZone Subscriber arhaney's Avatar
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    I saw a truck in Lee county, MS with the SCBAs mounted on the OUTSIDE of the truck, anybody seen this lately?
    Chief
    Wren Volunteer Fire Department
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    http://www.wrenfiredepartment.4t.com/

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  12. #12
    MembersZone Subscriber dmleblanc's Avatar
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    Originally posted by arhaney
    I saw a truck in Lee county, MS with the SCBAs mounted on the OUTSIDE of the truck, anybody seen this lately?
    Yes, we had a couple of trucks at work with the SCBA's mounted on the outside. They were in vinyl covers with Velcro closures. We replaced both those trucks about 2 years ago. The covers kept out the UV rays and most of the rain, but dust would filter in sometimes. Glad we finally got new rigs and got rid of that arrangement.
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream — and I hope you don't find this too crazy — is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    — C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

  13. #13
    MembersZone Subscriber arhaney's Avatar
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    Originally posted by dmleblanc


    Yes, we had a couple of trucks at work with the SCBA's mounted on the outside. They were in vinyl covers with Velcro closures. We replaced both those trucks about 2 years ago. The covers kept out the UV rays and most of the rain, but dust would filter in sometimes. Glad we finally got new rigs and got rid of that arrangement.
    What really scared me was the fact that these didn't even have a cover on them!!!!! Probably didn't matter cause the packs were as old as the truck.
    Chief
    Wren Volunteer Fire Department
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    Southern Division

    http://www.wrenfiredepartment.4t.com/

    In Memory of:
    FireFighter/Pilot James Archer
    1946-2005
    "Rest in peace James, you now have the ultimate set of wings on you."

    Thanks, LeuitEFDems

  14. #14
    Forum Member RLFD14's Avatar
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    Originally posted by dmleblanc
    There was also a transverse compartment just behind the cab that had a long bar mounted on the ceiling, and this compartment had bunker coats on hangers (like a closet).

    I don't believe in the practice because it's impossible to carry the right size for everyone that might show up.
    Both of our engines had this closet arrangement. They have since been modified to have large roll-out trays, and each member who so chooses to can keep their gear in a bag on the truck. Gets around the "grab-bag gear outfitters scenario" - when you get there you get your OWN gear. Words are exchanged if someone "borrows" someone else's gear.

    Because of my location relative to the station I tend to arrive at many scenes before the engine. Thus I carry my gear in the car, and put on my gear before I respond, so when the engine shows up I can starting packing up while the other guys rummage for their gear bags.

    Safety observation: Having your gear on before you arrive helps you avoid taking any stupid risks or shortcuts. In the heat of the moment it seems easy to skip your hood or not button up all the way when gearing/packing in front of a blazing structure. Better to get prepared when there are fewer distractions.

  15. #15
    MembersZone Subscriber arhaney's Avatar
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    Originally posted by RLFD14



    Because of my location relative to the station I tend to arrive at many scenes before the engine. Thus I carry my gear in the car, and put on my gear before I respond, so when the engine shows up I can starting packing up while the other guys rummage for their gear bags.

    Safety observation: Having your gear on before you arrive helps you avoid taking any stupid risks or shortcuts. In the heat of the moment it seems easy to skip your hood or not button up all the way when gearing/packing in front of a blazing structure. Better to get prepared when there are fewer distractions.
    One of my friends taught me this a long time ago. This is the best advice I could ever give anyone! Doesn't matter if I'm at work or home, I suit up before I go 10-8. I've often been asked how I get ready so quick, but most of the guys (and gals) don't realize that I was already suited up! I've even been known to pull over and suit up if the call came in while I was driving. Just like RLFD14 stated, it's much easier to do when you are not looking at that fire or MVC.........
    Chief
    Wren Volunteer Fire Department
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    Southern Division

    http://www.wrenfiredepartment.4t.com/

    In Memory of:
    FireFighter/Pilot James Archer
    1946-2005
    "Rest in peace James, you now have the ultimate set of wings on you."

    Thanks, LeuitEFDems

  16. #16
    Forum Member SpartanGuy's Avatar
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    Wink

    Originally posted by arhaney


    One of my friends taught me this a long time ago. This is the best advice I could ever give anyone! Doesn't matter if I'm at work or home, I suit up before I go 10-8. I've often been asked how I get ready so quick, but most of the guys (and gals) don't realize that I was already suited up! I've even been known to pull over and suit up if the call came in while I was driving. Just like RLFD14 stated, it's much easier to do when you are not looking at that fire or MVC.........
    Bah, not as dramatic for the cameras


    Obviously kidding. But seriously: I think it's all training and experience. It's natural to get excited, but if you have a specific routine and sequence and control yourself, you can still get dressed while looking the beast in the eye...

    I'm a big advocate of be dressed before you get in the truck though, at least pants, coat, and nomex hood. It's kinda hard to put on a turnout coat while working the federal, laptop, radio, and trying to get a pack on afterwards.... Trust me, learned from experience...
    "Captain 1 to control, retone this as a structure and notify the fire chief...."

    Safety is no accident.

  17. #17
    Forum Member SafetyPro's Avatar
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    Originally posted by arhaney
    I saw a truck in Lee county, MS with the SCBAs mounted on the OUTSIDE of the truck, anybody seen this lately?
    Our truck ('78 ALF Century TDA) has an SCBA mounted on each side just behind the turntable. One is for the officer and the other is for the Engineer as they don't have SCBA racks. There's also an SCBA mounted up next to the open tiller seat. The two side ones have vinyl covers, but the tiller one only has a cover for the mask. The truck isn't outside much unless its on a call, so they don't get much exposure to the weather.

    We also have an exterior rack on the running board above the Engineer-side rear wheel for 5 spare SCBA cylinders.
    Chris Gaylord
    Emergency Planner / Fire Captain, UC Santa Cruz FD

  18. #18
    Forum Member KEEPBACK200FEET's Avatar
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    Originally posted by arhaney


    One of my friends taught me this a long time ago. This is the best advice I could ever give anyone! Doesn't matter if I'm at work or home, I suit up before I go 10-8. I've often been asked how I get ready so quick, but most of the guys (and gals) don't realize that I was already suited up! I've even been known to pull over and suit up if the call came in while I was driving. Just like RLFD14 stated, it's much easier to do when you are not looking at that fire or MVC.........
    Is that safe? We had a warehouse fire once and I had to leave the scene in a 4x4 Dodge Ram to go to a neighboring station to pick up some supplies (my assigned task at the moment) and I left my gear on, and yea, hard to find the brake pedal wearing baggy gear and big leather boots, even inside that big truck. When I had my 4x4 Tacoma, it was damn near impossible to drive suited up.
    Last edited by KEEPBACK200FEET; 03-13-2005 at 02:33 AM.

  19. #19
    MembersZone Subscriber arhaney's Avatar
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    Originally posted by KEEPBACK200FEET


    Is that safe? We had a warehouse fire once and I had to leave the scene in a 4x4 Dodge Ram to go to a neighboring station to pick up some supplies (my assigned task at the moment) and I left my gear on, and yea, hard to find the brake pedal wearing baggy gear and big leather boots, even inside that big truck. When I had my 4x4 Tacoma, it was damn near impossible to drive suited up.
    With my old turnout gear, that didn't fit well at all, I wouldn't drive with it. You know, pants to big, coat to big, boots big and floppy! Oh yea, most times I wait until I get out on scene to put my coat on.
    Last edited by arhaney; 03-13-2005 at 09:40 AM.
    Chief
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    http://www.wrenfiredepartment.4t.com/

    In Memory of:
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    1946-2005
    "Rest in peace James, you now have the ultimate set of wings on you."

    Thanks, LeuitEFDems

  20. #20
    Forum Member KEEPBACK200FEET's Avatar
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    I cant see that as being safe although I did drive back from VA one night in my gear(I left the doors to my dads Wrangler at home) because I got cold as hell on the way home.

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